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World media criticize Scott Morrison’s handling of bushfire crisis and say the government is to blame

Media organizations around the world have criticized the way Australia handles the bushfire crisis and describe it as a “monstrous reality” that politicians largely ignore.

Three separate outlets mentioned the re-election of Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who until recently refused to discuss climate change with regard to forest fires.

The nation’s economic dependence on coal exports was also mentioned as a factor that contributed to the widespread crisis.

Morrison once brought coal to parliament to discourage people from being “afraid” when the nation debated reducing mining.

So far, Australian forest fires have killed 24 people, destroyed more than 1,500 homes and destroyed more than four million hectares of land.

Residents watch as flames burn through the bush on January 4, in Lake Tabourie, NSW

Residents watch as flames burn through the bush on January 4, in Lake Tabourie, NSW

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks about Monday's governments' bushfire response at a press conference

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks about Monday's governments' bushfire response at a press conference

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks about Monday’s governments’ bushfire response at a press conference

It is estimated that half a billion animals were swept away in the flames that have been burning through much of Australia’s east coast since October.

Novelist Richard Flanagan wrote an opinion piece for the New York Times make comparisons between the bushfire crisis and the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in the Soviet Union in 1986.

Pictured: Australian author Richard Flanagan

Pictured: Australian author Richard Flanagan

Pictured: Australian author Richard Flanagan

Flanagan said it would not surprise him if Australian politics crumbled like the Soviet Union did after such a catastrophic disaster.

“Could it be that the immense, still burgeoning tragedy of the Australian fires turns out to be the Chernobyl of the climate crisis?” He wrote.

He described the political sphere as sclerotic and demented – frozen in the inability to directly face the “monstrous reality” of the crisis.

The nation commits “climate change suicide” according to Mr. Flanagan, born and raised in Tasmania.

“Australia is zero today for the climate disaster. The glorious Great Barrier Reef is dying, the rainforest of world heritage, the giant kelp forests, numerous cities are on the point, and now the vast continent is burning on a scale, “he said.

“And yet, unbelievably, the Australian leaders’ response to this unprecedented national crisis is not to defend their country, but to defend the fossil fuel industry, a big donor to both big parties – as if they were willing to do so. to undergo its demise. “

Pictured: A car driving over a road as the sky turns red with smoke from the forest fire in the Snowy Valley on the outskirts of Cooma on January 4

Pictured: A car driving over a road as the sky turns red with smoke from the forest fire in the Snowy Valley on the outskirts of Cooma on January 4

Pictured: A car driving over a road as the sky turns red with smoke from the forest fire in the Snowy Valley on the outskirts of Cooma on January 4

A burned vehicle is seen in a stripped house after a nighttime bushfire in Quaama in NSW

A burned vehicle is seen in a stripped house after a nighttime bushfire in Quaama in NSW

A burned vehicle is seen in a stripped house after a nighttime bushfire in Quaama in NSW

Mr Flanagan referred to Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s trip to Hawaii and noted that he was in fact driven out of Cobargo – a fire-ridden city – when he visited.

He said: Morrison has tried to present the fires as a catastrophe as usual, nothing special. ”

Meanwhile CNN, an American news source, published a story on Saturday stating that Australia’s way of life is being threatened in the flames.

The analysis of the fire threat has determined that Morrison “could get into trouble” about the fire crisis.

Here, too, the outlet called its international holiday, as fires destroyed much of Australia’s east coast and commented on the delay in declaring a crisis.

Firefighters have defended lives and property for weeks against the fire. Pictured: two firefighters do what they can to stop the Batlow fire on Saturday

Firefighters have defended lives and property for weeks against the fire. Pictured: two firefighters do what they can to stop the Batlow fire on Saturday

Firefighters have defended lives and property for weeks against the fire. Pictured: two firefighters do what they can to stop the Batlow fire on Saturday

Dozens of houses are fearfully lost in Batlow. Pictured: a home completely in flames on Saturday

Dozens of houses are fearfully lost in Batlow. Pictured: a home completely in flames on Saturday

Dozens of houses are fearfully lost in Batlow. Pictured: a home completely in flames on Saturday

Fire and rescue, as well as water-bombing helicopters, did their best to help in Batlow on Saturday, but poor visibility made it difficult and risky

Fire and rescue, as well as water-bombing helicopters, did their best to help in Batlow on Saturday, but poor visibility made it difficult and risky

Fire and rescue, as well as water-bombing helicopters, did their best to help in Batlow on Saturday, but poor visibility made it difficult and risky

The reporter said that backyard barbecues were forbidden and Australia’s most famous beach, Bondi, was basically untouchable because of the dust and debris that had made the nation’s air quality the poorest in the world.

“Australia’s political passivity to climate change can be difficult to understand,” the report concluded.

‘Famous for its natural beauty, the country suffers annual fires and intense drought. It regularly breaks down heat sources and its rain patterns become less predictable. The seasons are starting to look backwards. ”

Pictured: Robinson Meyer from the Atlantic Ocean

Pictured: Robinson Meyer from the Atlantic Ocean

Pictured: Robinson Meyer from the Atlantic Ocean

The Atlantic OceanRobinson Meyer wrote: “Australians will lose due to climate change.”

He also criticized the country’s handling of the climate crisis and said that Australia’s dependence on coal sales has hampered efforts to protect the country from fires and floods.

“Australia nods under the conditions that have helped its fossil fuels,” he wrote in the play. “Perhaps the two largest types of climate disasters that occur today have started to hit the continent.”

Referring to the forest fires and the dying Great Barrier Reef, Mr. Meyer believes that both crises have been exacerbated by the government’s decision to “keep the light on” for East Asian economies instead of paying attention to a potential climate disaster.

“Australia is trapped in a climate spiral. In recent decades, the country has filled up its economy by selling coal to the world.

“Faced with such geographical challenges, the people of Australia might be able to make an effort to reverse these dangers.

“Instead,” he wrote, “they have chosen leaders with different priorities.”

As the fire front approached, the sky was filled with orange flames and thick, gray plumes of smoke

As the fire front approached, the sky was filled with orange flames and thick, gray plumes of smoke

As the fire front approached, the sky was filled with orange flames and thick, gray plumes of smoke

THE BUSHFIRE CRISIS OF AUSTRALIA – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

The evacuations are on their way and there are emergency warnings in NSW, Victoria and South Australia, as the authorities predict that the devastating forest fires will continue to burn until at least March.

At least 23 people have been killed in fire throughout the country since the bushfire season began in October, six are still missing in areas affected by fire

NEW SOUTH WALES / ACT

  • Two people are not mentioned – one near Bodalla on the south coast and the other person from Bombala near the Victorian border
  • At least 150 forest fires burned in NSW on Sunday
  • 18 people dead
  • 3.6 million hectares burned, larger than the size of Belgium
  • At least 1,365 houses confirmed destroyed

VICTORIA

  • Two people dead, four missing
  • About 50 forest fires burn
  • More than 784,000 hectares burned
  • 330 structures confirmed destroyed but expected considerably more

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

  • Three people, including two from Kangaroo Island, are dead
  • 17 forest fires burn, four of significance
  • More than 100,000 hectares burned
  • 88 houses confirmed destroyed
  • Approximately 600 properties on Kangaroo Island remain without power with SA Power Networks that warn that it may take some time for crews to access the fire department to assess damage

QUEENSLAND

  • 33 forest fires burn
  • 250,000 hectares burned
  • 45 houses confirmed destroyed

WEST AUSTRALIA

  • More than 35 forest fires burn, two of significance
  • 1.5 million hectares burned
  • A house confirmed destroyed

TASMANIA

  • 23 forest fires burn, two of significance
  • 30,000 hectares burned
  • Destroyed two houses confirmed

NORTHERN TERRITORY

  • Five fires burn
  • Destroyed five houses confirmed

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