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Woolworths issues an urgent warning to Australian shoppers

Woolworths issues a four-week supermarket warning every Australian should know as prices rise

  • Cold and wet weather has affected growing conditions and the supply of fruit and vegetables
  • Woolworth’s supply of lettuce, berries and beans would return in July to the end of August
  • Figures from the consumer price index show that the price of vegetables has increased by 12.7% in one year

Woolworths has warned that the price of lettuce is likely to remain at an all-time high, with customers having to wait until the end of August for their grocery bills to be deferred.

In an email sent to shoppers on Thursday, the supermarket giant said weather conditions and disrupted planting schedules mean there will be a shortage of lettuce.

The newsletter from Woolworths fruit and vegetable general manager Paul Turner did not specify the exact date when salad supply would improve, but that customers can expect improved availability in four weeks.

Woolworths warned that poor growing conditions caused by heavy rainfall, cold weather and lack of sunshine have affected the supply and price of fruit and vegetables (Pictured, Woolworths Crows Nest, Sydney)

Woolworths warned that poor growing conditions caused by heavy rainfall, cold weather and lack of sunshine have affected the supply and price of fruit and vegetables (Pictured, Woolworths Crows Nest, Sydney)

“Wet and cold weather has slowed planting and slowed overall growth,” Mr Turner said.

Woolworths expects supplies of iceberg and spinach to recover around the end of July, while cos (lettuce) should improve by the end of August.

Mr Turner said heavy rain, cold weather and lack of sunshine have hampered the supply of fruits, vegetables and leafy greens at the supermarket.

The supply of zucchini, peppers, kale, silver beet and leafy greens is expected to improve in July, along with strawberries, blueberries and raspberries.

The Woolworths update said the green bean crop is recovering, but supply will remain low until the end of August.

The latest figures from the Consumer Price Index show that the cost of vegetables has risen by 12.7 percent since last year.

Harris Farm Markets advertised green beans for a whopping $39.99 per kilogram

Australian shoppers were shocked after an image emerged of a grocer charging $11.99 for a single head of lettuce

Shoppers on the east coast of Australia are forced to pay eye-watering prices for fresh fruit and vegetables. A grocery store charged customers $39.99 for a pound of green beans (left) while another grocer had advertised lettuce for $11.99 a head (right)

It comes after images surfaced of the outrageous prices Australians have to pay for fresh produce.

A store in Harris Farm Markets charged its customers $39.99 per kilo for green beans, while customers in a suburban store were charged as much as $12 for a head of lettuce.

Earlier this month, KFC was forced to change its menu due to skyrocketing lettuce prices and ongoing supply shortages.

The fast food chain posted a notice on its website warning customers that a “cabbage blend” would be used in all items containing lettuce.

“We are currently facing a lettuce shortage due to the recent floods in NSW and Queensland,” the message reads.

“So until further notice we use a mixture of lettuce and cabbage on all products that contain lettuce.”

Meanwhile, Western Australia has dodged the country’s lettuce crisis as the majority of fresh produce comes from the state, keeping costs low and shelves full.

The state has not experienced the same growing impact as its East Coast counterparts, which have kept lettuce prices at an average of $3.50 per capita.

KFC was forced to change its menu due to skyrocketing lettuce prices and ongoing supply shortages (photo, KFC in Fairfield, Sydney)

KFC was forced to change its menu due to skyrocketing lettuce prices and ongoing supply shortages (photo, KFC in Fairfield, Sydney)

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