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Those who develop the condition before middle age are nearly three times more likely to die from a heart attack or stroke, especially women at risk

Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes before turning 40 are & # 39; THREE TIMES equally likely to die young from a heart attack or stroke & # 39;

  • Type 2 diabetes has risen enormously in recent years with rising levels of obesity
  • Researchers from the University of Glasgow looked at around 2 million people for the study
  • Those who were diagnosed before 40 had the greatest risk of early death or heart attack
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Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, while under the age of 40, are twice as likely to die early than their peers, a study found.

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Those who develop the condition before middle age are nearly three times more likely to die from a heart attack or stroke, especially women at risk.

The risk decreased steadily with age, with people diagnosed with 80 or older having the same chances of dying early as people without diabetes.

Experts say the findings show that more emphasis should be put on disease prevention – which is strongly related to obesity – especially in younger women.

Those who develop the condition before middle age are nearly three times more likely to die from a heart attack or stroke, especially women at risk

Those who develop the condition before middle age are nearly three times more likely to die from a heart attack or stroke, especially women at risk

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Type 2 diabetes rates have risen enormously in recent years with rising levels of obesity with the result that a growing number of adolescents and young adults are being diagnosed.

Researchers at the University of Glasgow wanted to compare the excess risks of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease in diabetes patients, taking into account how long they have had the condition.

They looked at 318,083 patients with type 2 diabetes and nearly 1.6 million people without heart conditions, using 15-year data.

During an average follow-up of almost two and a half years, researchers compared the results with control participants of comparable age without type 2 diabetes.

WHAT ARE TYPE 2 DIABETES?

Type 2 diabetes is a condition in which the blood sugar level of a person becomes too high.

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It is thought that more than 4 million people in the UK have some form of diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is associated with being overweight and it is more likely that you will get it if it is in the family.

The condition means that the body does not respond well to insulin – the hormone that controls the uptake of sugar in the blood – and is unable to properly regulate blood glucose levels.

Excess fat in the liver increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, because the build-up makes it more difficult to control glucose levels and the body is also more resistant to insulin.

Weight loss is the key to reducing liver fat and getting symptoms under control.

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Symptoms include fatigue, thirst, and frequent urination.

It can lead to more serious problems with nerves, vision and the heart.

Treatment usually involves changing your diet and lifestyle, but in more serious cases, medication may be needed.

Source: NHS Choices; Diabetes.co.uk

They discovered that those diagnosed before the age of 40 had the greatest excess risk of death, stroke, heart attack, heart failure, or atrial fibrillation.

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Women generally had higher excess risk of cardiovascular disease and death than men.

These risks also declined steadily with the age of diagnosis, according to the findings published in the Circulation of the American Heart Association.

But patients who were diagnosed before the age of 40 had almost five times the risk of heart failure and more than four times the risk of heart disease.

Patients who developed the condition before adulthood tended to live more than ten years less than their healthier peers, the study found.

Naveed Sattar, professor of metabolic medicine and lead author of the study, said it demonstrated that health interventions should be aimed at younger patients with or at risk of type 2 diabetes.

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& # 39; Our study shows that the differences in excessive diabetes risk are related to how old the person is when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; This suggests that we should be more aggressive in managing risk factors in younger type 2 diabetes populations and especially in women.

& # 39; Much less effort and resources can be spent screening people 80 and older for type 2 diabetes unless the symptoms are present.

& # 39; In addition, our work could also be used to encourage middle-aged people with an increased risk of diabetes to make lifestyle changes to postpone their diabetes for several years. & # 39;

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