Women still do most of the housework with only 7% of couples sharing their duties equally

It is the big battle between the sexes, whose turn it is to do the dishes and remove the bins.

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But even in the modern world, women are much more likely to get stuck with most of the household.

A study of more than 8,500 British couples showed that in 93 percent of women the majority of household chores are performed.

Even if men and women both work full time, women are five times more likely to do housework more than 20 hours a week.

It is the big battle between the sexes, whose turn it is to do the dishes and remove the bins. But even in the modern world, women are much more likely to get stuck with most of the household (stock image)

It is the big battle between the sexes, whose turn it is to do the dishes and remove the bins. But even in the modern world, women are much more likely to get stuck with most of the household (stock image)

Men are almost as vocal as women who think couples should share work and home based on the results of the UK Household Longitudinal Study.

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But when it comes down to it, they are much more likely to avoid doing housework and doing less than five hours a week.

In older couples whose children have left the house, nearly half of the men get away with less than five hours of chores a week, compared to just eight percent of the women.

Where men manage to do as much housework as their partner, or more, it is mostly because she is the biggest breadwinner, but this happens to only seven percent of couples.

Professor Anne McMunn, who led the study at University College London, said: & These results are important because this is additional work that women do for free because housework is unpaid.

& # 39; We don't think this is an active choice of men to control women.

But even today, if there is something that needs to be done at home, women just do it.

& # 39; We tend to follow the patterns in which we saw our parents fall as we grew up, but this is described as a & # 39; second shift & # 39; for women coming home from work and doing more in the form of household chores. & # 39;

A study of more than 8,500 British couples showed that in 93 percent of women the majority of household chores are performed. Even when both men and women work full time, women are five times more likely to do housework more than 20 hours a week (stock image)
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A study of more than 8,500 British couples showed that in 93 percent of women the majority of household chores are performed. Even when both men and women work full time, women are five times more likely to do housework more than 20 hours a week (stock image)

A study of more than 8,500 British couples showed that in 93 percent of women the majority of household chores are performed. Even when both men and women work full time, women are five times more likely to do housework more than 20 hours a week (stock image)

It is known that women still do much more housework than men, but researchers wanted to understand why.

They split couples into eight groups based on their answers to work, housework, and healthcare responsibilities for the UK Household Longitudinal Study 2010-11, which is given to thousands of people each year for research purposes.

The largest group, of about two in five couples, consisted of relatively young & # 39; two-income households & # 39 ;, who are expected to share housework, since the men and women both work full time and usually have no children.

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But in fact, 16 percent of women spent 20 or more hours of their week doing housework, compared to just three percent of men.

The second largest group consisted of couples where men had full-time jobs and women worked part-time or not, largely because nearly three-quarters had young children at home.

In addition to the majority of childcare, more than half of these women did 20 or more hours of housework per week. In contrast, nearly two-thirds of their husbands and partners spent less than five hours.

Among the couples of fifty and sixty, whose adult children had mainly left the house, 44 percent of the women did 20 or more hours of housework per week.

The housework was divided equally, or men did more, among the six percent of couples, women were the main earners or the one percent where men & # 39; stayed at home & # 39; were spouses, fathers or guardians or retired early.

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Housework was largely uneven despite a similar proportion of men and women with modern views on gender roles, such as the importance for women to work and their place not at home.

Professor McMunn said: & # 39; Men still earn more than women on average, and that gives them a little more influence on negotiating housework.

& # 39; In the home atmosphere, things don't change as quickly as we may have thought, so we need to raise our awareness and think about it a bit more.

The study was published in Work, employment and society.

WHAT CAUSES OF RELATIONSHIP?

A relationship can have many drawbacks, but & # 39; marriages often die more from ice than from fire & # 39 ;, says leading relationship expert Dr. Michael McNulty.

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Couples drift apart and this often leads to separation.

The first steps that cause couples to fall apart in a break-up can be broken down as follows:

Phase one: More negativity than positivity seeps into the relationship.

Phase two: The four horsemen of the apocalypse: contempt, criticism, defensiveness and stonewalling all contribute to a toxic relationship.

Phase three: Flooding – The stage where anger begins to come out of the relationship and the partners become very emotional.

Phase four: Emotional withdrawal – Check out after the huge amount of emotional turmoil before this is where relationships grow old, with both parties already.

Relationships of any height can become harmful and susceptible to failure if the two people involved do not constantly work on maintaining parity and a healthy relationship (stock image)

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