Women should ALWAYS be given pain relief after coil application, say medics

Women should ALWAYS be given pain relief after coil application, say medics

  • Faculty of Sexual Reproductive Health Care said painkiller should be an option
  • Naga Munchetty said the coil was ‘one of the most traumatic experiences’
  • NHS guidelines say women should be given painkillers before the procedure

Women should always get pain relief once they’ve applied the coil, medics say.

The Sexual and Reproductive Health Care Faculty — which advises nurses and doctors — said it should always be an option today.

They made the statement after BBC presenter Naga Munchetty, 46, said placing the device was ‘one of the most traumatic physical experiences I’ve had’.

She said she passed out twice after experiencing “excruciating” pain while the contraceptive was being inserted into her body, and that she was not offered an anesthetic.

Munchetty told BBC Radio 5 Live she has a high pain tolerance but the procedure was “one of the most traumatic physical experiences I’ve had”.

The coil, or IUD, is inserted into the uterus and prevents pregnancies by releasing copper, which kills sperm, and preventing eggs from binding to the uterine walls.

NHS guidelines say women should be given painkillers before having the device fitted.

Some women may experience pain similar to menstrual cramps after getting the device, but a few may experience severe pain and anxiety.

It’s not clear how many women in the UK have the IUD, but in the US it is believed that over a million women rely on it as a contraceptive.

Experts from the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health said today that painkillers should always be offered when someone has the IUD inserted

It comes after Naga Munchetty said getting braces was 'one of the most painful traumatic physical experiences I've had'

It comes after Naga Munchetty said getting braces was ‘one of the most painful traumatic physical experiences I’ve had’

The FSRH said in June it would “share updated clinical guidance on this matter and work with our members to share best practices to ensure women experience the highest standards of IUD care.”

It has now issued a statement saying that “women should always receive pain relief from IUD procedures.”

It said for many women that the pain associated with an IUD is similar to menstrual cramps, but for some, the experience is painful and terrifying.

The FSRH said there is no clear best pain relief option to relieve pain associated with inserting intrauterine contraception.

But it recommends health professionals “create a supportive environment and provide appropriate pain relief when women attend their IUD insertion procedures.”

What is the coil or IUD?

The IUD, a small, T-shaped copper device that is inserted into the uterus, creates a hostile environment for sperm, preventing pregnancy.

It can be used as emergency contraception for up to five days after intercourse – a move that is particularly recommended when a woman is ovulating (14 days between her periods), as the morning-after pill (“Plan B” in America) is less effective during this time .

It also provides long-term contraception that can last up to 10 years.

There are two types: the hormonal (Mirena) spiral and the non-hormonal (copper) spiral.

The hormonal spiral can remain in the womb for 10-15 years and is associated with lighter periods.

Although the non-hormonal IUD is sometimes associated with heavier periods, it has gained popularity as one of the few forms of birth control that bypasses the side effects of hormonal birth control in women, such as mood swings and skin problems.

dr. Janet Barter, vice president of the FSRH, said: ‘It is always worrying to hear about the pain some women have experienced while fitting an IUD and this has sparked an important discussion among healthcare professionals and users. of IUDs.

‘FSRH training in intrauterine contraception includes education about pain relievers.

“We regularly review the evidence to incorporate any proven new technique into our clinical guidelines to support best practice so that women can experience quality contraceptive care.

“While this is not new, we encourage healthcare professionals to create a supportive environment and provide appropriate pain relief.

‘My experience is that many women reject the offer, but the option has to be there. Not all clinics or GP practices can offer local anesthesia and where this is the case, referrals should be made to another service.

“We also need to make sure that the patient knows that they can ask to stop the procedure at any time. It is important to realize that some individuals report severe pain associated with the procedure.

“However, for many women, the pain associated with an IUD fitting is similar to experiencing menstrual cramps and not experiencing any major problems.”

In June, Health Minister Nadine Dorries said she was “shocked” by reports of women experiencing pain when having an IUD put in.

She told the Health and Social Care Committee, “No woman should suffer as a result of having an IUD or other scope procedures.”

IUDs are used as a form of birth control.

According to nhs.uk, an IUD is a small T-shaped plastic and copper device that is placed in the uterus and releases copper to prevent a woman from becoming pregnant.

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