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The Daily Mail launched a campaign two months ago calling on the government to urgently address the social care crisis, in particular dementia (stock image)

The terrible toll of the social care crisis among women can be revealed today.

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Official figures show that caring for loved ones has devastating consequences for their health and quality of life.

Women are twice as likely as men to care for a family member and run a much higher risk of depression, loneliness and other illnesses.

The figures come from a large NHS survey among 50,800 unpaid healthcare providers, which showed that 68 percent of them are female.

Half of the women said they did not have enough time to take care of themselves by eating well or sleeping well.

The Daily Mail launched a campaign two months ago calling on the government to urgently address the social care crisis, in particular dementia (stock image)

The Daily Mail launched a campaign two months ago calling on the government to urgently address the social care crisis, in particular dementia (stock image)

& # 39; I have given up work to look after mommy & # 39;

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Isobel Woods became a & # 39; complete mess & # 39; she tried to juggle her job while taking care of her mother.

The 64-year-old worked full-time as a career advisor and also acted as an unpaid caregiver. She finally gave up her job after her boss told her she had stopped working early to consult her mother Hazel (89), who has dementia.

Isobel, 64, (right) and her mother Hazel Woods, 89

Isobel, 64, (right) and her mother Hazel Woods, 89

Isobel, 64, (right) and her mother Hazel Woods, 89

Mrs. Woods, who lives in Coventry with her husband Alan, 61, said that her life was becoming increasingly difficult & # 39; She said: & # 39; We just kept extinguishing constantly. There would be hospital appointments, dental appointments, she wanted her to do her – rightly so, you had to do things like that to make her life worthwhile.

& # 39; I didn't concentrate as much as I should have been at work, but neither did I take good care of Mom. It is a hidden disaster. It is impossible to do that and work. It almost always seems to fall on the woman. & # 39;

The mother of two said she drank & # 39; like a fish & # 39; to fall asleep. Her mother's dementia has since worsened and she has moved to a nursing home.

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One in five – 21 percent – said they neglected their own health. Another 48 percent felt depressed and 32 percent had consulted their doctor because their healthcare responsibilities made them sick.

The Daily Mail launched a campaign two months ago calling on the government to urgently address the social care crisis, particularly in the case of dementia. Nearly 345,000 readers have demanded our petition demanding action.

Campaigners said the figures showed that more government financing was vital. & # 39; Dementia care is a mess, and it is mostly women who pick up the excitement & quot ;, said Sally Copley of the Alzheimer's & # 39; s Society.

& # 39; Without a well-funded system of dementia care, more skilled and experienced women are leaving staff than ever before to care for relatives and loved ones with dementia. & # 39;

Caroline Abrahams of Age UK said: “Every day many women go above and beyond to care for their loved ones. The failure of the care system means that women in particular are often left behind to pick up the pieces. Some are at the breaking point and many are at risk.

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& # 39; Women should not be able to care for themselves alone, as is often the case nowadays. & # 39;

Yesterday, Boris Johnson promised to spend £ 13 billion on 40 new hospitals at the Tory party conference in Manchester, but did not report social care. He promised the social care crisis & # 39; once and for all & # 39; to resolve in his first speech as Prime Minister in July, but made no further announcements.

The email analyzed the latest results of an NHS Digital survey among 50,800 adult caregivers that was published at the end of June.

The figures show that 78 percent of female caregivers have limited control over their daily lives, some describe themselves as & # 39; socially isolated & # 39 ;. A third of the caregivers of both sexes cared for dementia patients and the rest cared for cancer patients or others with long-term disorders.

This survey has been conducted every two years since 2012/13 and the latest figures suggest that the situation is deteriorating.

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More and more of the country's estimated seven million caregivers report being depressed, socially isolated, not sleeping, or having to visit their doctor for reasons related to their responsibilities.

The results were worse for women, half of whom were forced to make a financial move, often because they had less time to work.

The Post campaign urges Mr Johnson to set up a cross-party group to find a financing solution for social care and to appoint a dedicated cabinet minister.

Research by the Alzheimer's Society over the weekend suggested that 112,000 adults had left their jobs last year to care for demented lovers.

One third of the caregivers of both sexes cared for patients with dementia and the rest cared for cancer patients or others with long-term disorders (stock image)

One third of the caregivers of both sexes cared for patients with dementia and the rest cared for cancer patients or others with long-term disorders (stock image)

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One third of the caregivers of both sexes cared for patients with dementia and the rest cared for cancer patients or others with long-term disorders (stock image)

Helen Walker from the charity Carers UK said: “Women in the UK are more affected by unpaid care duties than men, especially in their 40s, 50s and 60s. The negative impact that this can have on women's careers, finances and overall quality of life is large. & # 39;

The majority of caregivers were aged 55 to 64 – a quarter of the total. No fewer than 37 percent said they suffered from physical strain, such as back problems due to lifting, and 25 percent said they had developed a health condition through care, including joint problems or depression.

Another 65 percent said they felt stressed and 43 percent said they were short-tempered or irritable.

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Health and Social Care said: “We are working to support unpaid caregivers by helping them stay in work or find a job and ensure they have access to paid breaks or respite care .

& # 39; We have given local authorities an additional £ 1.5 billion next year for social care for adults and children, in addition to existing grants, to continue to stabilize the sector. The government will prepare plans to restore the social care system in due course. & # 39;

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