Woman's parents who died when Irish doctors refused to perform abortion meet the Indian government to demand justice

Woman's parents who died when Irish doctors refused to perform abortion meet the Indian government to demand justice

  • Savita Halappanavar, 31, did not feel well when she was admitted to the Galway University hospital
  • The dentist, who was 17 weeks pregnant, received no medical treatment and died of blood poisoning on 28 October
  • Indian officials have promised parents Anadappa and Akka Mahadevi Yalgi every possible help
  • Pro-choice campaigners are planning mass meetings in Ireland calling for abortion

A tragic loss: Savita & # 39; s parents have installed a shrine in her house, in accordance with the Hindu tradition

A tragic loss: Savita & # 39; s parents have installed a shrine in her house, in accordance with the Hindu tradition

The parents of an Indian woman who died of blood poisoning after Irish doctors refused her an abortion met officials to claim justice for their daughter.

Savita Halappanavar, 31, was 17 weeks pregnant when she started a miscarriage and died a week later of septicemia.

Her husband Praveen Halappanavar, 34, has told how he begged doctors at Galway University Hospital to end the pregnancy, but they refused to do so because she & # 39; in a Catholic country & # 39; and the fetal heartbeat was still present.

The tragedy has triggered the search for souls in the Republic of Ireland, where abortion is illegal, as well as great anger in some circles.

Campaigners demand a change in the law to allow abortion in cases where the mother's life is in danger.

Savita & # 39; s parents Anadappa Yalgi, 62, and his wife Akka Mahadevi Yalgi, 54, met municipal government officials late Friday afternoon in the parental home in Belgaum, southwest India.

The grieving couple asked the deputy commissioner of Belgaum, Anbu Kumar, to help guarantee all possible help from the Indian government.

Mr. Kumar said about the meeting: & # 39; I have visited the house and offered the help of our government where possible. & # 39;

Seeking justice: the deputy commissioner of Belgaum, Anbu Kumar (left), promised Savita & # 39; s father Anadappa Yalgi all possible help Seeking justice: the deputy commissioner of Belgaum, Anbu Kumar (left), promised Savita & # 39; s father Anadappa Yalgi all possible help

Seeking justice: the deputy commissioner of Belgaum, Anbu Kumar (left), promised Savita & # 39; s father Anadappa Yalgi all possible help

To show respect: the deputy commissioner waited a moment for reflection before the Sanctuary of Savita To show respect: the deputy commissioner waited a moment for reflection before the Sanctuary of Savita

To show respect: the deputy commissioner waited a moment for reflection before the Sanctuary of Savita

Savita & # 39; s mother, left, had asked her daughter to return to Belgaum to give birth, but Savita thought she would be safer in Ireland Savita & # 39; s mother, left, had asked her daughter to return to Belgaum to give birth, but Savita thought she would be safer in Ireland

Savita & # 39; s mother, left, had asked her daughter to return to Belgaum to give birth, but Savita thought she would be safer in Ireland

A photo of Savita now hangs in the family's house, covered with a sling, as is traditional in the Hindu community of India after the death of a loved one.

Following comments from her parents, the Indian ambassador to Ireland said today that Ms. Halappanavar might still be alive if she was being treated in India.

Debashish Chakravarti told the RTÉ radio that he hoped that the Irish government would take steps to ensure that the circumstances that led to her never appeared again.

Abortion is not illegal in India when the mother's life is in danger, the ambassador noted.

Meanwhile, the Irish ambassador to India, Feilim McLaughlin, was officially called by the Delhi government on Friday to discuss an investigation into the death of Mrs. Halappanavar.

Madhusudan Ganapathi, Western Secretary in the Foreign Ministry, told the Irish envoy that he hoped the tragedy investigation would be independent.

He also conveyed the sadness that people in India felt when & # 39; a young life had come to an early end & # 39 ;.

Indian Foreign Minister Salman Khurshid said of the tragedy: "Saving the mother's life is of the utmost importance if you can't save the child's life."

Destroyed: Praveen Halappanavar (pictured with his wife Savita at their home in Galway) says he watched helplessly when she died of blood poisoning due to a miscarriage after doctors refused to perform an abortion Destroyed: Praveen Halappanavar (pictured with his wife Savita at their home in Galway) says he watched helplessly when she died of blood poisoning due to a miscarriage after doctors refused to perform an abortion

Destroyed: Praveen Halappanavar (pictured with his wife Savita at their home in Galway) says he watched helplessly when she died of blood poisoning due to a miscarriage after doctors refused to perform an abortion

Savita Halappanavar, 31, died at Galway University Hospital, where doctors refused to perform a medical termination because they were in a Catholic country. and the fetal heartbeat was still present Savita Halappanavar, 31, died at Galway University Hospital, where doctors refused to perform a medical termination because they were in a Catholic country. and the fetal heartbeat was still present

Savita Halappanavar, 31, died at Galway University Hospital, where doctors refused to perform a medical termination because they were in a Catholic country. and the fetal heartbeat was still present

Mr. Halappanavar, Savita's husband, described how he held her hand when she died.

When she relived her last moments, he said: & # 39; In the night, around one o'clock, the nurse came running while I was standing in front of ICU.

& # 39; She just told me to be brave, and she took me to Savita, and she said, "Do you want to be OK to be there, to live her last minutes?

& # 39; I said "Yes, I want". I held her hand, they tried to pump her heart, there was a large team nearby. The doctor just told me they lost her. & # 39;

Halappanavar, who works as an engineer at Boston Scientific in Galway, came to Ireland with his wife four years ago to start a new life together. She had a job in Westport, Co Mayo and the couple lived in the city of Galway.

Public outrage: the tragedy has caused a huge amount of soul investigation in the Republic of Ireland, with campaigners demanding a law change to allow abortions when the mother's life is in danger Public outrage: the tragedy has caused a huge amount of soul investigation in the Republic of Ireland, with campaigners demanding a law change to allow abortions when the mother's life is in danger

Public outrage: the tragedy has caused a huge amount of soul investigation in the Republic of Ireland, with campaigners demanding a law change to allow abortions when the mother's life is in danger

Happy couple: Savita and her husband Praveen dance at Diwali festival 2010 in Galway, video from youtube Happy couple: Savita and her husband Praveen dance at Diwali festival 2010 in Galway, video from youtube

Happy couple: Savita and her husband Praveen dance at Diwali festival in 2010 in Galway, video from YouTube

They were so enthusiastic about the expected birth of their first child that it was to be expected on March 20 that they had been in the shower early in the past few weeks when Mrs. Halappanavar's parents were visiting.

Pro-choice activists in Ireland have turned to social media networks to organize a massive protest against the country's abortion laws on Saturday.

A rally in the center of Dublin is expected to attract several thousand demonstrators and follows similar rallies on Thursday evening in Belfast and on Friday in Derry.

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