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Victoria Hotson, 41, pictured at her home in Hoghton, Lancashire, does daring challenges to relieve the pain of her fibromyalgia after other methods have not helped her
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A fibryomyalgia sufferer faces extreme challenges because she has discovered that adrenaline is the best form of medicine for her painful pain.

Victoria Hotson, 41, has driven an Aston Martin on a 200 mph (322 km / h) course, has done a tandem skydive and plans to take a wing walk next month.

She claims that the risk and anxiety associated with the adrenaline-pumping challenges subtracts her thoughts from her paralyzing condition, which Lady Gaga is also fighting.

Mrs. Hotson, from Hoghton, Lancashire, can tolerate chronic pain that is so bad 24 hours a day that she feels like she is constantly being stabbed with a knife.

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She claims that she was fit and active before she woke up one morning 14 years ago with back pain getting worse.

Her other symptoms of fibryomyalgia include fatigue and irritable bowel syndrome. It also causes mood disorders such as anxiety and depression.

There is no cure for the condition. Acupuncture, massages, hypnotherapy, steroid injections and methods of mental healing have not relieved Mrs Hotson of her pain.

Victoria Hotson, 41, pictured at her home in Hoghton, Lancashire, does daring challenges to relieve the pain of her fibromyalgia after other methods have not helped her

Victoria Hotson, 41, pictured at her home in Hoghton, Lancashire, does daring challenges to relieve the pain of her fibromyalgia after other methods have not helped her

Mrs. Hotson has driven an Aston Martin at 200 mph (photo), completed a tandem skydiving and is planning to take a wing walk next month
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Mrs. Hotson has driven an Aston Martin at 200 mph (photo), completed a tandem skydiving and is planning to take a wing walk next month

Mrs. Hotson has driven an Aston Martin at 200 mph (photo), completed a tandem skydiving and is planning to take a wing walk next month

Mrs. Hotson discovered that the risk and the fear caused her to abandon her chronic condition, which Lady Gaga also fights with. Depicted in hospital in June 2019 with severe pain

Mrs. Hotson discovered that the risk and the fear caused her to abandon her chronic condition, which Lady Gaga also fights with. Depicted in hospital in June 2019 with severe pain

Mrs. Hotson discovered that the risk and the fear caused her to abandon her chronic condition, which Lady Gaga also fights with. Depicted in hospital in June 2019 with severe pain

Mrs. Hotson said: “Any activity that gives me an adrenaline rush or an experience of doing something fast makes me happy when all other emotions fall into oblivion.

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& # 39; I can't hurt my body anymore, so I tell myself I can do it just as well. I know my parents and my husband are worried. But for me it's a temporary solution.

& # 39; I always think about what I can do next. I am so distracted by something else, it restarts my brain. & # 39;

Mrs. Hotson previously enjoyed golf, squash and football, but woke up one morning with her entire back 14 years ago.

From there, her pain got worse and worse until she was finally diagnosed with fibryomyalgia in 2008 at the Royal Preston Hospital.

Mrs. Hotson said: “Nothing happened at all, if I had been in a car accident, I could rationalize it.

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& # 39; I just woke up in bed one morning and my whole back was sore. At the time I was driving quite a long way to my workplace, so I thought it was just a downside in the back.

& # 39; It never went away and then I unfortunately continued to visit doctors and consultants and did blood tests for rheumatoid arthritis, arthritis itself and other conditions. & # 39;

Mrs. Hotson, pictured in her Hoghton, Lancashire home, previously enjoyed golf, squash, and soccer, but woke up one morning with her entire back 14 years ago.

Mrs. Hotson, pictured in her Hoghton, Lancashire home, previously enjoyed golf, squash, and soccer, but woke up one morning with her entire back 14 years ago.

Mrs. Hotson, pictured in her Hoghton, Lancashire home, previously enjoyed golf, squash, and soccer, but woke up one morning with her entire back 14 years ago.

It took three years for doctors to diagnose fibromyalgia, initially believing it could be arthritis

It took three years for doctors to diagnose fibromyalgia, initially believing it could be arthritis

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It took three years for doctors to diagnose fibromyalgia, initially believing it could be arthritis

Mrs. Hotson, pictured when she did a skydive in 2016, said: & # 39; The only time I am pain-free is when I have a bit of an adrenaline rush & # 39;

Mrs. Hotson, pictured when she did a skydive in 2016, said: & # 39; The only time I am pain-free is when I have a bit of an adrenaline rush & # 39;

Mrs. Hotson, pictured when she did a skydive in 2016, said: & # 39; The only time I am pain-free is when I have a bit of an adrenaline rush & # 39;

Ms. Hotson is working on a list of challenges to create a & # 39; temporary solution & # 39; for her to get hurt. Presented on a seaplane in Sri Lanka, February 2016

Ms. Hotson is working on a list of challenges to create a & # 39; temporary solution & # 39; for her to get hurt. Presented on a seaplane in Sri Lanka, February 2016

Ms. Hotson is working on a list of challenges to create a & # 39; temporary solution & # 39; for her to get hurt. Presented on a seaplane in Sri Lanka, February 2016

HOW DO THE CHALLENGES HELP AVOID THE PAIN?

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Adrenaline reduces the body's ability to feel pain, allowing a person to run as well as possible away from the danger, even if they are injured.

The hormone is produced as part of the body's fight or flight response to a stressful event.

When the amygdala signals a hazard in the brain, it sends a signal to the hypothalamus, which is compared to the command center of the brain.

The hypothalamus sends a signal to the adrenal glands, which are above the kidneys, to produce adrenaline and release it into the bloodstream.

It influences the body so that the person can think clearer and faster and escape from a threat.

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Adrenaline lets more oxygen go to the lungs to help a person run away. In addition, blood vessels contract to redirect blood to important muscle groups, including the heart and lungs.

Distraction can also remove pain, but not really remove it. Usually, comedy seems to work well.

Researchers at Columbia University have investigated how mental efforts can help relieve pain with striking # 39; findings.

The small 2012 study, published in the journal Psychological Science, subjected 33 participants to mild pain on their forearms.

They reported less discomfort when they were asked to perform a distracting mental test while the pain was being applied. Some thought that the heater that delivered the pain was not even turned on.

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Mrs Hotson's condition is so painful that she often becomes bedridden and has to take up to 30 painkiller tablets per day.

Her poor health even forced Mrs. Hotson to retire early because of her role in the United Utilities water service.

Since her diagnosis, Mrs. Hotson has tried acupuncture, massages, hypnotherapy, 40 steroid injections and Reiki, a method for spiritual healing.

Mrs. Hotson said: “Doctors have never said why it developed from a little back to the extent it is now, that's the biggest challenge.

& # 39; You don't know how you will be every day, if you have a broken left or arm, you can guess how long the pain will last, but with fibromyalgia it's just a struggle. & # 39;

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She added: & # 39; The pain can be dull but very striking and sharp. It just feels like someone is constantly piercing me all day, all day, every day.

& # 39; People suffering from this condition have certain ways to help them cope, with me it is an adrenaline rush. Sounds completely disturbed but this adrenaline simply takes away the pain.

& # 39; The only time I am pain free is when I have a bit of an adrenaline rush. When something distracts me and I can concentrate on something else. & # 39;

Mrs. Hotson said her husband, who has not been named, bought her a race day driving Aston Martin experience that enabled her to drive at 200 MPH.

She said: & I was on pure adrenaline, I couldn't feel any pain.

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& # 39; It's like euphoria and it's just like I'm in a bubble because I'm not doing something that isn't in normal reality. It's that big kick of excitement and the risk and fear of it. & # 39;

Mrs Hotson has also used the challenges as a mental health coping strategy with which she has been struggling for the past two years.

Ms. Hotson, pictured at the Royal Preston Hospital, June 2017, said: & The pain can be dull but very striking and sharp. It just feels like someone is constantly piercing me all day, all day, every day & # 39;

Ms. Hotson, pictured at the Royal Preston Hospital, June 2017, said: & The pain can be dull but very striking and sharp. It just feels like someone is constantly piercing me all day, all day, every day & # 39;

Ms. Hotson, pictured at the Royal Preston Hospital, June 2017, said: & The pain can be dull but very striking and sharp. It just feels like someone is constantly piercing me all day, all day, every day & # 39;

There is no medication or treatment in the UK that can relieve the pain of fibromyalgia. Mrs. Hotson has tried acupuncture, general massage, hypnotherapy, 40 steroid injections and Reikiis to relieve her pain. She is depicted in 2010 in Wales

There is no medication or treatment in the UK that can relieve the pain of fibromyalgia. Mrs. Hotson has tried acupuncture, general massage, hypnotherapy, 40 steroid injections and Reikiis to relieve her pain. She is depicted in 2010 in Wales

There is no medication or treatment in the UK that can relieve the pain of fibromyalgia. Mrs. Hotson has tried acupuncture, general massage, hypnotherapy, 40 steroid injections and Reikiis to relieve her pain. She is depicted in 2010 in Wales

Mrs. Hotson, who was sailing in Greece in August 2014, said the condition prevents her from doing things she always liked because of the constant pain

Mrs. Hotson, who was sailing in Greece in August 2014, said the condition prevents her from doing things she always liked because of the constant pain

Mrs. Hotson, who was sailing in Greece in August 2014, said the condition prevents her from doing things she always liked because of the constant pain

Mrs. Hotson, pictured at her home, said the challenges her & # 39; euphoria & # 39; to give

Mrs. Hotson, pictured at her home, said the challenges her & # 39; euphoria & # 39; to give

Mrs. Hotson, pictured at her home, said the challenges her & # 39; euphoria & # 39; to give

She then takes part in a wing walk with Into the Blue at Breighton Aerodrome, near Selby, on July 6 to raise money for Lancashire Mind. It is about walking along the aircraft wings while it is flying.

She also hopes to swim with sharks, to fly the longest zipline in Wales, to ride an Aston Martin de Autobarn in Germany and to rally.

Mrs. Hotson said: "I am unable to do the things I used to do, I had to adjust my life completely and so did my husband. I certainly feel it has limited my life a lot.

& # 39; I have to use different tools at home to make life a little easier. For example with a plastic jug and lighter pans.

& # 39; I may have all the support in the circle of loved ones, family and friends, but this does not take away the pain, spasms, fatigue and helplessness.

& # 39; I know many people are even worse, but no one can really understand how you feel physically, emotionally, and mentally, because the threshold and possibilities of each person are different. & # 39;

To help Ms. Hotson raise funds, visit here.

WHAT IS FIBROMYALGIA?

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that is defined by widespread pain and fatigue.

It affects up to 2.7 percent of people around the world, with three women suffering for every man, studies suggest.

Fibromyalgia is often caused by trauma, such as a car accident or birth, as well as infections. Why this happens is unclear.

The discomfort is usually felt as aches and pains from head to toe.

And the tiredness varies from feeling sleepy to the exhaustion of having the flu.

Serious patients are often unable to work or to socialize.

The pain can sometimes be worse than others and may change location, such as becoming more severe in parts of the body that are most used.

Other symptoms may include headache; IBS; diarrhea or constipation; poor concentration; dizziness; allergies and stimuli sensitivity, such as light or heat.

Studies suggest that the average patient has to wait five years to be diagnosed, which is thought to be the result of X-rays and other medical tests that do not pick up the condition.

It is generally defined as pain that lasts longer than three months and affects 11 or more of 18 sensitive points when pressed.

Treatment is aimed at relieving pain and promoting sleep.

Source: Fibromyalgia Action UK

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