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A photo has become viral from Jade Devis, 36, from Rancho Cucamonga, California, who kissed her baby boy after chemotherapy during pregnancy (photo)

This is the heart-warming moment that a Californian woman, who underwent chemotherapy during pregnancy, kissed her newborn son shortly after giving birth.

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Jade Devis, 36, from Rancho Cucamonga, was diagnosed a few months after learning a rare form of breast cancer.

Her doctors told her that her baby was probably too young to survive the treatment and that she should consider terminating her pregnancy Good morning America.

But Devis refused and decided to undergo chemotherapy in an attempt to save her life and the life of her unborn son.

After three months of treatment, Devis gave birth to a healthy baby boy named Bradley, and a photo became viral of her son's kissing – which she & # 39; prodigy & # 39; has called – on the head.

A photo has become viral from Jade Devis, 36, from Rancho Cucamonga, California, who kissed her baby boy after chemotherapy during pregnancy (photo)

A photo has become viral from Jade Devis, 36, from Rancho Cucamonga, California, who kissed her baby boy after chemotherapy during pregnancy (photo)

Devis felt a lump in her left breast in March 2019 and was sent to a radiologist who told her it was probably a side effect of her pregnancy. Pictured: Devis undergoing chemotherapy
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Devis felt a lump in her left breast in March 2019 and was sent to a radiologist who told her it was probably a side effect of her pregnancy. Pictured: Devis undergoing chemotherapy

Pictured, left and right: Devis undergoes chemotherapy

Pictured, left and right: Devis undergoes chemotherapy

Devis felt a lump in her left breast in March 2019 and was sent to a radiologist who told her it was probably a side effect of her pregnancy. Devis asked for a biopsy and was diagnosed with stage 2 triple-negative breast cancer. Pictured left and right: Devis undergoing chemotherapy

According to an press release, Devis discovered a sore bump in her left breast in March 2019, during her first trimester, which was hard to touch.

Her doctor sent her to a radiologist who said the lump was probably a symptom of her pregnancy, but Devis stayed with her arms and asked for a biopsy.

& # 39; If I had ignored it, I would have been dead, & # 39; she said.

A few weeks later the results of the Devis biopsy returned: a diagnosis of stage 2 triple negative breast cancer.

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According to the American Cancer Society, one in eight American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime.

It is estimated that in 2019 more than 268,000 cases will be diagnosed and more than 41,700 people will die.

It is the second leading cause of cancer death in women, after lung cancer. Breast cancer also occurs in men, but the incidence is less than one percent.

Triple-negative breast cancer is a rare form of breast cancer in which cancer growth is not fueled by the hormones estrogen and progesterone, or by the HER2 protein.

Devis was told that her baby was probably too young to survive the treatment, but she refused to terminate her pregnancy. Pictured: Devis with her newborn son

Devis was told that her baby was probably too young to survive the treatment, but she refused to terminate her pregnancy. Pictured: Devis with her newborn son

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Devis was told that her baby was probably too young to survive the treatment, but she refused to terminate her pregnancy. Pictured: Devis with her newborn son

This means that tumors do not respond to hormonal therapy drugs or drugs that target the HER2 protein, making the cancer more aggressive and difficult to treat.

Devis was operated on in April to remove the lump, after which she was told that she would need chemotherapy.

& # 39; I had parental debt. I felt bad because I already felt bad & # 39 ;, she told Good Morning America.

& # 39; Then someone tells you the only way out of the situation is to do one thing you shouldn't do, and that puts your baby at risk. & # 39;

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According to a Facebook message, Devis was told that her baby was not big enough or strong enough to survive the treatment.

During the first trimester, chemotherapy can increase the risk of birth defects – because the organs are still growing – or a miscarriage.

During the second and third trimesters, however, the placenta acts as a barrier as a barrier to allow no or small amounts of medication through to the baby.

She eventually sought treatment at the Loma Linda University Cancer Center, where doctors came up with a plan to save both Devis and her son.

Dr. Gayathri Nagaraj, Devis' oncologist at Loma Linda, told Good Morning America that pregnant women with adjustments can undergo chemotherapy during the second and third trimesters.

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& # 39; She received three chemo cycles during the second and third trimester of her pregnancy, & # 39; said Dr. Nagaraj.

& # 39; We took a full week break so that she could give birth to baby Bradley safely. Now she completes the rest of her chemo. & # 39;

Bradley was born on July 25 with a weight of six pounds, 11 grams and without complications.

She underwent surgery to remove the lump and then three months of chemotherapy before she was given a healthy baby boy name on July 25, Bradley. Pictured: Devis, left, with her oncologist at Loma Linda University Cancer Center, Dr. Gayathri Nagaraj

She underwent surgery to remove the lump and then three months of chemotherapy before she was given a healthy baby boy name on July 25, Bradley. Pictured: Devis, left, with her oncologist at Loma Linda University Cancer Center, Dr. Gayathri Nagaraj

She underwent surgery to remove the lump and then three months of chemotherapy before she was given a healthy baby boy name on July 25, Bradley. Pictured: Devis, left, with her oncologist at Loma Linda University Cancer Center, Dr. Gayathri Nagaraj

Bradley was born without complications, and Devis will start radiation therapy next month and complete chemotherapy in November. Photo courtesy of KTLA

Bradley was born without complications, and Devis will start radiation therapy next month and complete chemotherapy in November. Photo courtesy of KTLA

Bradley was born without complications, and Devis will start radiation therapy next month and complete chemotherapy in November. Photo courtesy of KTLA

A photo went viral from Devis lying in bed with her son – her head bald after chemotherapy treatments – and kissed him.

& # 39; My baby boy is my child prodigy, & # 39; Devis said in a statement.

& # 39; It is surreal to remember that my pregnancy had an element of extraordinary anxiety. I am blessed when I look at my son and I cannot ask for more. & # 39;

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Dr. Nagaraj said that Devis will start radiation therapy next month and will complete chemotherapy in November.

& # 39; It is not necessary to wait until the baby is born and give your cancer a chance to grow, & # 39; she told Good Morning America, referring to chemotherapy in later stages of pregnancy.

& # 39; There are risks, but there are benefits. Jade did great. She took all the medical support we offered her and she remains strong. I think this story is worth telling because of all the women who would inspire her and Bradley. & # 39;

A GoFundMe This page has been started to cover the costs of Devis medical treatments. Starting Monday morning, more than $ 2,300 has been raised from a $ 50,000 goal.

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