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Lauren Lopez, 32, from Westford, Massachusetts, was first diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2012 after abnormal cancer cells were found in her cervix. Pictured: Lopez in the hospital

A woman from Massachusetts who was told that cervical cancer could not be treated and that it would kill her within a year is still blossoming two years later.

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In 2012, when Lauren Lopez was 24, she visited her gynecologist for an annual checkup when abnormal cells were found during her Pap test.

The cells were cancerous but after two cone knife biopsies, which removes tissue from the cervix, she was told that she was cancer free, reported TODAY.

In 2017, at the age of 30, Lopez was told that her cancer had returned. She was told that it was incurable and that she had six months to a year to live.

Two years later, the 32-year-old yoga teacher from Westford said she chose to stay positive and found something to be thankful for every day.

Lauren Lopez, 32, from Westford, Massachusetts, was first diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2012 after abnormal cancer cells were found in her cervix. Pictured: Lopez in the hospital

Lauren Lopez, 32, from Westford, Massachusetts, was first diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2012 after abnormal cancer cells were found in her cervix. Pictured: Lopez in the hospital

After two cone knife biopsies, which removes tissue from the cervix, Lopez was told that she was cancer free. Pictured: Lopez with her husband
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After two cone knife biopsies, which removes tissue from the cervix, Lopez was told that she was cancer free. Pictured: Lopez with her husband

She said she didn't know much about HPV, the infection that caused her cancer. Pictured, left and right: Lopez with her husband

She said she didn't know much about HPV, the infection that caused her cancer. Pictured, left and right: Lopez with her husband

After two cone knife biopsies, which removes tissue from the cervix, Lopez was told that she was cancer free. She said she didn't know much about HPV, the infection that caused her cancer. Pictured, left and right: Lopez with her husband

Lopez told TODAY that she was aware of most sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) but not of HPV, which led to her cancer.

HPV, the abbreviation for Human papillomavirus, is the most common STD in the US and affects approximately 79 million people.

It has been associated with various cancers – including prostate, throat, head, and neck, rectum, and cervical cancer.

Since the HPV vaccine was introduced in 2006, 79 countries and territories have implemented government-funded national HPV vaccination programs.

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In the US, the vaccine is offered in six or two doses over the course of six months to girls between the ages of 11 and 12, with a catch-up series recommended by the age of 26.

& # 39; No one has talked about HPV, & # 39; told Lopez TODAY. & # 39; I had none of the vaccines. The vaccines were not really discussed. & # 39;

That's why she was shocked when her gynecologist found abnormal cancer cells in her cervix, the lower part of the womb, but relieved when she was told it wasn't serious.

The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 13,000 American women will develop cervical cancer in 2019, leading to more than 4,200 deaths.

& # 39; They said to me: & # 39; You don't have to worry. The forecast is great and we noticed it early & # 39 ;, said Lopez.

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In 2015, doctors discovered a new cancer tumor and Lopez decided to undergo a hysterectomy.

A cancerous mass was found in 2015 and Lopez (photo) underwent a hysterectomy, an operation to remove the uterus

A cancerous mass was found in 2015 and Lopez (photo) underwent a hysterectomy, an operation to remove the uterus

A cancerous mass was found in 2015 and Lopez (photo) underwent a hysterectomy, an operation to remove the uterus

In 2017, Lopez (photo) was told that the cancer had returned and that it was incurable

In 2017, Lopez (photo) was told that the cancer had returned and that it was incurable

Lopez (photo) said her goal is to be grateful for one thing every day

Lopez (photo) said her goal is to be grateful for one thing every day

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In 2017, Lopez (left and right) was told that the cancer had returned and that it was incurable. She said her goal is to be thankful for one thing every day

This is a surgical procedure that removes the uterus, but can include the cervix, ovaries, and fallopian tubes.

& # 39; Even with my hysterectomy, a species was still presented that you are completely done, & # 39; told Lopez TODAY.

Then in 2017 doctors told that the cancer had returned – and it was not treatable.

Despite her terminal diagnosis, Lopez says she has made a goal to find something to be thankful for every day.

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& # 39; It is deceiving my brain to celebrate the little moments, & # 39; said Lopez. & # 39; It started with something simple and it coiled and flourished. & # 39;

She said she wants to inspire and suffer from other cancer survivors and that there is life after being diagnosed with an incurable disease.

& # 39; Even if they give you a terminal diagnosis … it's okay to make plans and dream, & # 39; she said. & # 39; You can be happy during cancer. & # 39;

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