Woman who & # 039; pressed limes & # 039; making margaritas ends up with burning burns over her hands

Woman squeezing & # 39; hundreds of limes & # 39; has to make margaritas, comes with burning burns on her hands after spending a day in the sun

  • Courtney Fallon, from New York, squeezed limes to make margaritas for her family during the Memorial Day weekend in Florida
  • When she woke up the next morning, she woke up with her hands covered with large red blisters and felt her skin as if she were & # 39; on fire & # 39;
  • She was diagnosed with phytophotodermatitis, which occurs when the skin comes in contact with the chemicals of a plant and is then exposed to UV rays.

A New York woman who during the weekend of Memorial Day & # 39; hundreds of limes & # 39; pressed to make margaritas, she got burning blisters in her hands.

Courtney Fallon was with her family in Florida for the holidays, mixing lime juice, ice and tequila – about one lime is needed for each cocktail – and spent the rest of the day relaxing by the pool in the sun.

However, the next morning she woke up with her hands covered with large, red blisters and felt her skin as if she were & # 39; on fire &, she reported. the appearance.

It was not a sunburn, but rather a condition known as phytophotodermatitis, which occurs when chemicals in plants – such as limes – ignite the skin after being exposed to sunlight.

Courtney Fallon, from New York, was diagnosed with phytophotodermatitis after squeezing limes to make margaritas for her family during Memorial Day weekend, and then lay in the sun for hours (file image of a case of phytophotodermatitis)

Courtney Fallon, from New York, was diagnosed with phytophotodermatitis after squeezing limes to make margaritas for her family during Memorial Day weekend, and then lay in the sun for hours (file image of a case of phytophotodermatitis)

Phytophotodermatitis is an inflammatory reaction that occurs when the skin comes in contact with the chemicals of a plant and is subsequently exposed to UV rays.

Reactions usually occur within 24 hours, with a peak between 48 and 72 hours after UV exposure.

First the skin turns red and itch and starts burning. Subsequently blisters form on the skin within 48 hours.

The blisters are usually irregular in shape because only the parts of the skin that are exposed appear to be burned.

& # 39; It only develops in areas where the chemical touches the skin, explains strange shapes such as streaks or dots where lime juice has fallen off or splashed from the skin, & # 39; Dr. Joshua Zeichner, director of cosmetic and clinical research at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, told Prevention.

& # 39; The first result is fiery red and often heels with a dark brown, black color. & # 39;

There are various plants and vegetables that contain chemical compounds known as photosensitizers, which means that – if activated by light – they can cause damage to cells.

Citrus fruits such as limes, lemons and oranges contain photosensitizers, but they are also found in carrots, celery, parsley and figs.

Phytophotodermatitis is difficult to diagnose because the symptoms often resemble other conditions, such as chemical burns, dermatitis or a fungal infection.

If you or a doctor have diagnosed you with phytophotodermatitis, the treatments are aimed at relieving pain.

Mild burns can be treated with ibuprofen, but more severe burns may require steroid creams or corticosteroids to reduce inflammation.

After the swelling decreases, blisters on the skin can become dark spots that last for weeks before they fade.

& # 39; It rarely causes permanent skin changes & # 39 ;, Zeichner said.

Experts recommend wearing gloves if you plan to squeeze margaritas &, if you do not wear gloves, wash your hands immediately before returning to the sun.

It is currently unknown whether Fallon's hands are healed or whether she still has blisters.

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