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Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

A recent college graduate has described her experience of being scammed by a LinkedIn job posting that promised her the social media management job she’d always dreamed of — only for her to discover it was actually a scam to get her money. to steal.

Callie Heim, 22, of Baltimore, Maryland, graduated from Towson University last May and was excited to start looking for a job, but was soon disheartened when her “perfect” job turned out to be a nightmare.

In a series of TikTok In videos, which have accumulated more than 200,000 views, Callie explained how she was scammed by the fake job listing while giving advice to others so they could avoid the same fate.

Callie Heim, 22, of Baltimore, Maryland, went to TikTok to reveal she had been scammed by a fraudulent LinkedIn job masquerading as a real company

Callie Heim, 22, of Baltimore, Maryland, went to TikTok to reveal she had been scammed by a fraudulent LinkedIn job masquerading as a real company

She explained in a series of viral videos that she applied for the job via 'easy apply' because it looked like the perfect job but was 'too good to be true'.

She explained in a series of viral videos that she applied for the job via 'easy apply' because it looked like the perfect job but was 'too good to be true'.

She explained in a series of viral videos that she applied for the job via ‘easy apply’ because it looked like the perfect job but was ‘too good to be true’.

The scammers pretended to be driving technology company Waymo

The scammers pretended to be driving technology company Waymo

The scammers used messaging platform Wire to conduct a fake interview and offer Callie a job

The scammers used messaging platform Wire to conduct a fake interview and offer Callie a job

The scammers impersonated the tech company Waymo and used the messaging platform Wire to conduct a fake interview and offer Callie a job.

The 22-year-old started applying for a variety of jobs through LinkedIn’s easy application option and was thrilled to finally get an interview from what she believes was the driving force behind tech company Waymo.

At the beginning of the video, Callie admitted, “It was humiliating and really embarrassing.

“I’ve been wanting to make a video about it for a while… I’ve decided I want to do it now to spread awareness and make sure this doesn’t happen to anyone else.”

She then explains that while applying for jobs, she stumbled upon what she thought was the perfect job.

She noted that it had great benefits, flexible hours and a great salary.

Callie applied via easy apply and received an interview request a few days later.

To conduct the interview, the recently graduated student explained that the company had asked her to download the Wire messaging app.

Reflecting on the experience in her video, she admitted it was the first of many red flags.

Callie didn’t pay much attention to the odd request at the time, as the company claimed it was a “futuristic” company, so they strayed from the simple ways of conducting interviews.

During the interview, Callie noted that the company had promised her a phone, printer, and laptop for work and even asked her specific questions about social media management.

‘I’m excited. They pretty much gave me the job after talking to them for another day, which is another red flag, but I didn’t realize at the time,” she said in her video.

In her first follow-up video, she explained that her boyfriend helped her realize it was a scam as she was blinded by her excitement.

Callie admitted, “It was humiliating and really embarrassing.  'I've wanted to make a video about it for a while...I've decided I want to do that now to raise awareness'

Callie admitted, “It was humiliating and really embarrassing.  'I've wanted to make a video about it for a while...I've decided I want to do that now to raise awareness'

Callie admitted, “It was humiliating and really embarrassing. ‘I’ve wanted to make a video about it for a while…I’ve decided I want to do that now to raise awareness’

To conduct the interview, the recently graduated student explained that the company had asked her to download the Wire messaging app, which she said should have been the first red flag.

To conduct the interview, the recently graduated student explained that the company had asked her to download the Wire messaging app, which she said should have been the first red flag.

To conduct the interview, the recently graduated student explained that the company had asked her to download the Wire messaging app, which she said should have been the first red flag.

During the interview, Callie noted that the company had promised her a phone, printer, and laptop for work and even asked her specific questions about social media management.

During the interview, Callie noted that the company had promised her a phone, printer, and laptop for work and even asked her specific questions about social media management.

During the interview, Callie noted that the company had promised her a phone, printer, and laptop for work and even asked her specific questions about social media management.

She explained, “It’s not LinkedIn’s fault.

“Someone pretended to be an HR person from a company that already had a job posting on LinkedIn, so they literally made their account look exactly like this, so it looked very legit.”

She added that the job “seemed too good to be true” but was naive.

After the job was formally offered, the company requested Callie to forward her banking information, such as her routing number and account number, as well as her personal identification forms.

After forwarding her private information, the company asked her to buy a laptop, promising to reimburse her afterwards.

“Immediately the alarm bells went off. However, I was so excited about this job that I thought ‘hmmm, let me see through it”.

Although Callie had yet to buy the laptop, the company sent her the check promising to refund her purchase, which she said was clearly “photoshopped.”

After receiving the check, Callie alerted her boyfriend Tommy Gould, 24, who works in cybersecurity.

Tommy took a closer look at the job posting and after some research discovered that Callie wasn’t the first to be fooled by the fraud job listing, adding that it was a known scam.

The Wire site even issues a warning about the scam, the warning reads: “The most common scam we are aware of involving Wire is a job application scam.

Scammers impersonate large organizations and offer jobs or interviews through messaging platforms such as Wire.

“Usually the victim is someone who works remotely.

However, when the company asked the 22-year-old to buy a laptop and promised to pay her back by sending her a check, she warned her boyfriend who found out it was a scam.

However, when the company asked the 22-year-old to buy a laptop and promised to pay her back by sending her a check, she warned her boyfriend who found out it was a scam.

However, when the company asked the 22-year-old to buy a laptop and promised to pay her back by sending her a check, she warned her boyfriend who found out it was a scam.

The Wire site even issues a warning about the scam, the warning reads: 'The most common scam we are aware of involving Wire is a job application scam'

The Wire site even issues a warning about the scam, the warning reads: 'The most common scam we are aware of involving Wire is a job application scam'

The Wire site even issues a warning about the scam, the warning reads: ‘The most common scam we are aware of involving Wire is a job application scam’

Callie ended the viral series by noting that the experience not only discouraged her but was embarrassing because she had already told her friends and family about her new job.

Callie ended the viral series by noting that the experience not only discouraged her, but was embarrassing because she had already told her friends and family about her new job.

Callie ended the viral series by noting that the experience not only discouraged her, but was embarrassing because she had already told her friends and family about her new job.

“They are offered the job and are then asked to buy a laptop and mobile through a portal set up by the fraudster with the promise of a refund when they join the company.

“The reality is there is no job, the interviewee never gets the laptop or cellphone, and the fraudster has collected the money and closed his Wire account.”

Callie ended the viral series by noting that the experience was not only discouraging but embarrassing because she had already told her friends, family and LinkedIn connections about her new job.

“It was definitely humbling because I’d already posted on LinkedIn and was like, ‘oh, this is my new job.'” All my old colleagues and everyone was like, “oh congratulations!” she said. ‘Yes. It was very embarrassing.’

She added: “They certainly didn’t rip me off financially, but they ripped me off emotionally.

“The way I was so excited for that job… The best thing that could have happened to me is that I got a job fresh out of college.”

She then explained that she closed her bank account after realizing the job was a scammer and thankfully didn’t send her social security number.

Users quickly rushed to the side of the 22-year-old as they offered their support and advice as she continued her job search.

1662746031 427 Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

1662746031 427 Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

1662746032 907 Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

1662746032 907 Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

1662746033 603 Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

1662746033 603 Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

1662746034 650 Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

1662746034 650 Woman reveals she was scammed by LinkedIn job listing

Users quickly rushed to the side of the 22-year-old as they offered their support and advice as she continued her job search

Users quickly rushed to the side of the 22-year-old as they offered their support and advice as she continued her job search

Users quickly rushed to the side of the 22-year-old as they offered their support and advice as she continued her job search

One user said: ‘The work process is stressful enough – and now we have to worry about scammers?! I’m very sorry’

Another added: ‘You need to freeze your credit. In case they try to open accounts in your name.’

“They can’t access your money just because they have your account information, but make sure you freeze your credit or sign up for Norton or other ID protection,” said another user.

One user wrote: ‘I had a crazy job situation about 4 years ago – a much better one came along and I’ve been there ever since. Don’t worry, it’s coming, honey.’

‘No, I’m so sorry. Thanks for sharing this, it helps more than you know,” added one user.

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