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Woman left paralyzed after being attacked by triplets

Triplets paralyzed after an attack by her own sister fight for her release from prison, but claim that the corona virus blocks her way to freedom.

Louise Velloza was left in a wheelchair for life when her sister, Gillian, pushed her out of a second-floor window in April 2013 during a furious feud.

Gillian, 31, who was charged with attempted murder after pleading guilty to GBH, was jailed for eight and a half years in 2013.

Louise has now forgiven her for the attack and pleads for her release because she believes she has learned her lesson.

Gillian has served in Drake Hall HM Prison in Staffordshire for seven years.

Louise Velloza (pictured) fights for her sister Gillian, 31, to be released from prison after forgiving her for a seizure that left her in a wheelchair

Louise Velloza (pictured) fights for her sister Gillian, 31, to be released from prison after forgiving her for a seizure that left her in a wheelchair

Louise and Gillian who are triplets revealed their third sister Kerry, died in a copycat condition when she fell out of a bedroom window in 2015. Pictured: Louise's last photo with Kerry

Louise and Gillian who are triplets revealed their third sister Kerry, died in a copycat condition when she fell out of a bedroom window in 2015. Pictured: Louise's last photo with Kerry

Louise and Gillian who are triplets revealed their third sister Kerry, died in a copycat condition when she fell out of a bedroom window in 2015. Pictured: Louise’s last photo with Kerry

Louise said her chance of being victimized for parole was canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak. Picture: the triplets as school girls

Louise said her chance of being victimized for parole was canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak. Picture: the triplets as school girls

Louise said her chance of being victimized for parole was canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak. Picture: the triplets as school girls

The triplet’s third sister, Kerry, tragically died under bizarre copycat conditions when she too fell out of a bedroom window in 2015.

Louise still needs care 24 hours a day and has a team of supporters in her home.

She said, “Gillian is my sister and I love her. There is a home here and a life for her. I have to live with the consequences of what she did to me every day, but I forgive her.

Gillian was due to be released on parole five years after her sentence, but due to staff absence and an administrative error, it was canceled.

“We’ve been pushing for a new hearing ever since, but we’re getting nowhere.

She would hold another conditional hearing in the spring of 2019, but again, it didn’t happen.

“There was a new date for 2020, but then the virus happened.

“I was told I could make a victim impact statement for yet another parole hearing, but this was also canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Louise, who is at high risk for the coronavirus and cannot visit Gillian (photo) in person, said this is the time when family is needed

Louise, who is at high risk for the coronavirus and cannot visit Gillian (photo) in person, said this is the time when family is needed

Louise, who is at high risk for the coronavirus and cannot visit Gillian (photo) in person, said this is the time when family is needed

“This is the time when we need our families and I need my sister. I am at great risk of the virus myself. I find it difficult to fight infections.

“I have to take powerful muscle relaxants and I still have spasms in my legs.

“I isolate myself and find it very difficult. I wear a mask and haven’t been gone for weeks. I need my sister’s support.

“I can’t go to Staffordshire personally, but I spoke to her. She’s really down and treated for depression.

“I’ve already lost our sister Kerry and I’m worried about losing Gillian. I don’t think she can last much longer.

“She has now been told that a new hearing has been canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak.”

Louise, who was once a player for Everton FC, will spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair after being attacked at the Liverpool flat she shared with Gillian. In the photo: Louise, Gillian and Kerry at school

Louise, who was once a player for Everton FC, will spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair after being attacked at the Liverpool flat she shared with Gillian. In the photo: Louise, Gillian and Kerry at school

Louise, who was once a player for Everton FC, will spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair after being attacked at the Liverpool flat she shared with Gillian. In the photo: Louise, Gillian and Kerry at school

The triplet's father, Chris, 53, said they were inseparable throughout their childhood, but Gillian and Louise would often argue. In the photo: Gillian, Louise and Kerry

The triplet's father, Chris, 53, said they were inseparable throughout their childhood, but Gillian and Louise would often argue. In the photo: Gillian, Louise and Kerry

The triplet’s father, Chris, 53, said they were inseparable throughout their childhood, but Gillian and Louise would often argue. In the photo: Gillian, Louise and Kerry

Once upon a time, a talented footballer who played for Everton FC, Louise, will spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair after the assault on the flat she and Gillian shared in Anfield, Liverpool.

Just two years later, their third triplet sister, Kerry, died after falling out of a second-floor window in Skelmersdale, Lancashire.

Dad, Chris, 53, reflected on the intense bond the three sisters once shared, threatening to break up their family.

Chris said, “The three girls are identical triplets and as youngsters they were inseparable.

Gillian and Louise always argued and clashed, and Kerry – the middle triplets – was the peacemaker.

“But they were all so close – and I never thought they would ever really hurt each other.

Chris admits he never thought his daughters would hurt each other. In the photo: Louise with her father

Chris admits he never thought his daughters would hurt each other. In the photo: Louise with her father

Chris admits he never thought his daughters would hurt each other. In the photo: Louise with her father

Chris brought the triplets up alone until he met his second wife, Catherine. Pictured: Chris with his first wife Gillian and the triplets when they were born

Chris brought the triplets up alone until he met his second wife, Catherine. Pictured: Chris with his first wife Gillian and the triplets when they were born

Chris brought the triplets up alone until he met his second wife, Catherine. Pictured: Chris with his first wife Gillian and the triplets when they were born

“One of my triplets is responsible for the other who spends her life in a wheelchair. And the other died after falling out of a window too. We have to live with that. ‘

The triplets’ youth was born six weeks premature, and doctors were unaware that there were three babies before birth.

Their natural mother, also known as Gillian, ran away when they were just two years old.

Chris fought through the courts for full custody of his three daughters and raised them alone until he met his second wife, Catherine. From the age of four she raised the girls.

Chris continued, “Apart from all the drama, we were a normal family and very cute little girls.

Chris said Kerry was the easygoing peacemaker who would solve all the triplet problems. In the photo: Louise and Kerry

Chris said Kerry was the easygoing peacemaker who would solve all the triplet problems. In the photo: Louise and Kerry

Chris said Kerry was the easygoing peacemaker who would solve all the triplet problems. In the photo: Louise and Kerry

“I was a full-time dad after their mom left, and I loved my triplets. A few minutes later, Gillian was the oldest. She was a real tomboy, she enjoyed climbing trees and she loved cars.

“Kerry was very easy going and she was the peacemaker. She would solve all problems.

Louise was the baby of three – just a few moments. She was easy to manage and kind-hearted.

“Although they looked the same, they had a very different smile. Like all sisters, they bickered a lot. ‘

But it was Gillian and Louise who clashed most often.

Louise said, “I remember we had a doll tea set and we both wanted to play with it. We had a big fight and it got crushed.

Louise, who was attacked by Gillian the day she moved in to live with her, has no memory of the incident. In the photo: Louise in the hospital

Louise, who was attacked by Gillian the day she moved in to live with her, has no memory of the incident. In the photo: Louise in the hospital

Louise, who was attacked by Gillian the day she moved in to live with her, has no memory of the incident. In the photo: Louise in the hospital

“Gillian really liked football, but I was the better footballer, signed by Everton girls, and she was jealous.”

Louise bottomed out when she was released from Everton FC and made the decision to temporarily live in a hostel with Gillian.

On the move day, she and Gillian had a furious fight. Louise does not remember the attack, but was captured on CCTV.

She said, “One minute I was in my new bedroom, the next I woke up in the hospital.”

Louise had cut her spinal cord and her lungs were damaged.

She was in a coma for three days and spent five months in the hospital. The 31-year-old was devastated to hear that she would never walk again.

Louise has revealed that time has healed the situation, she wants Gillian to go home because of the threat of the corona virus

Louise has revealed that time has healed the situation, she wants Gillian to go home because of the threat of the corona virus

Louise has revealed that time has healed the situation, she wants Gillian to go home because of the threat of the corona virus

Louise added: “When I heard that my own sister was responsible for my injuries, I was in shock.

“But time is healing, and now that our lives are under threat from the coronavirus, I just want her to be home.”

A spokesperson for the Parole Board said, “An oral hearing is on the list for Gillian Velloza’s parole review and will take place in July.

“The Parole Board’s job is to determine whether someone would pose a significant risk to the public upon release.

The panel will look carefully at a range of evidence, including details of the original evidence and any evidence of behavioral change. We do that with great care and public safety is our number one priority. ‘

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