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Woman is stunned to discover a lamp covered in BLOOD at a thrift store

A woman was stunned to discover a lamp in a thrift store that was covered in what appeared to be blood, and is now determined to find out what happened to the previous owners.

Paige Nicole, 25, of Texas, was looking for a vintage lamp while shopping at a Salvation Army in the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex last month.

When she came across one with a ‘cool’ brass base and a ‘nice’ hood, she thought she had found the perfect one.

However, when she got home and plugged it in, she was shocked to find that it was covered in huge red spots that looked like blood, but were only visible when the lamp was on.

A woman was stunned to discover a lamp covered in what appeared to be blood at a thrift store, and is now determined to find out what happened to the previous owners

A woman was stunned to discover a lamp covered in what appeared to be blood at a thrift store, and is now determined to find out what happened to the previous owners

Paige Nicole, 25, of Texas, was hunting for a vintage lamp while shopping at a Salvation Army in the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex last month

Paige Nicole, 25, of Texas, was hunting for a vintage lamp while shopping at a Salvation Army in the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex last month

However, when she got home and plugged in her new lamp, she was shocked to find that it was covered in huge red spots that looked like blood.

However, when she got home and plugged in her new lamp, she was shocked to find that it was covered in huge red spots that looked like blood.

She shared her findings TikTokwhere the video quickly went viral – garnering over six million views within a few days and many people on the internet investing in the lamp and its backstory.

While chatting with DailyMail.com recently, Paige said she “immediately noticed” the light in the vintage store and thought it was a “really great find.”

She shared her findings on TikTok, where the video quickly went viral - leading many people on the internet to invest in the lamp and its backstory.

She shared her findings on TikTok, where the video quickly went viral – leading many people on the internet to invest in the lamp and its backstory.

“The base was brass and it was just cool,” she explained. “It reminded me of something my grandparents had in their house, so I was excited to find something vintage and familiar.”

But after discovering the red spots, her excitement quickly turned to horror.

“I was shocked,” she recalls the moment she discovered the blood-colored spots. “I was shocked, surprised and alarmed. It was surreal.’

“My mind immediately went to blood, then to food, then to wine—but I kept going back to blood.”

She then decided to run a test on the lamp in an effort to find out if the substance is actually blood.

Human blood contains an enzyme called catalase, which causes hydrogen peroxide to bubble up and turn pink when the two are mixed together.

Paige dipped a cotton swab in peroxide and rubbed it over part of the lamp—which she documented in another TikTok video—and she soon noticed the stain was getting a lighter color.

“That’s not good, that’s not good,” she said in the video, before adding a sequel, “I poured some more peroxide on it last night and it bubbled and fizzed.”

While chatting with DailyMail.com recently, Paige recalled being

While chatting with DailyMail.com recently, Paige recalled being “shocked, shocked, surprised and alarmed” when she noticed the blood-colored spots

She then decided to run a test on the lamp in an attempt to find out if the substance is really blood by rubbing hydrogen peroxide on it.

She then decided to run a test on the lamp in an attempt to find out if the substance is really blood by rubbing hydrogen peroxide on it.

She then decided to run a test on the lamp in an attempt to find out if the substance is really blood by rubbing hydrogen peroxide on it.

Human blood contains an enzyme called catalase, which causes hydrogen peroxide to bubble up and turn pink when the two are mixed together, and Paige said it started to

Human blood contains an enzyme called catalase, which causes hydrogen peroxide to bubble up and turn pink when the two are mixed together, and Paige said it started to “fizzy”

Paige admitted to DailyMail.com that she “paniced” after taking the hydrogen peroxide test, so she decided to contact a relative who has been in the police force for over 20 years and ask them what they must do.

“Their advice was helpful. “Based on the information I shared, along with the photos, I was told there was a possibility it was blood,” she said.

Her relative theorized that the lamp’s previous owner committed suicide.

Paige added, “In their experience, relatives tend to dispose of anything near the site of such tragedies to avoid the memories of the items.”

The Texas college student explained that she decided to call the police to let them know what she found, but they couldn’t do much because they couldn’t figure out who originally owned it.

“My relative said there’s a good chance it won’t be tested, but I’ve contacted the local police just to be sure. I was told it could be blood, but they refused to chase it,” she said.

Paige contacted a relative who has been with the police for over 20 years who confirmed it was likely blood

Paige contacted a relative who has been with the police for over 20 years who confirmed it was likely blood

Her relative theorized that the lamp's previous owner committed suicide because

Her relative theorized that the lamp’s previous owner committed suicide because “relatives tend to dispose of everything near the site of such tragedies.”

While Paige still

While Paige still “wants to know more,” she feels like she’s hit a dead end. She said, ‘There’s not really a way to get more history on it, so I guess it’s just up to everyone’s imagination’

“It’s already been contaminated by all the people who touched it, so the police or forensics team wouldn’t really be able to do anything except put the blood DNA in a database in case something turns up in the future.”

“They should have the perpetrator’s DNA, which is only likely if the person is a criminal. Otherwise it will not enter the database.

“If this is blood, it could be 20, 30 or more years old, so there’s no way to find out where it came from or how many hands it’s been in.”

She added that she also contacted the thrift store to see if they had a ‘record’ of who donated it, but was told it had been left ‘anonymous’ and that there was ‘no way to track’. where it came from.

While Paige still “wants to know more,” she now feels like she’s hit a dead end.

“There’s really no way to get more history on it, so I guess it’s up to everyone’s imagination at the time,” she concluded.

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