Advertisements
Samantha Rideout, 30, from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, broke her right foot during a fall at home in September 2018. On the photo: Rideout walking on crutches after her leg is amputated

A 30-year-old woman had amputated part of her right leg after an infection of a broken foot that extended to her bone and had not been diagnosed for months.

Advertisements

Samantha Rideout, from St John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, broke her right foot after she stumbled and fell down the stairs in September 2018.

For most, this would be a painful injury.

But Rideout was born with spina bifida, a serious birth defect that occurs when the spinal cord does not form properly, meaning she has little or no feeling in her feet.

The mother of the three visited the emergency department several times, had multiple X-rays performed, was rotated on antibiotics, but her broken foot remained untreated.

When an orthopedic surgeon finally diagnosed the broken foot two months later and tried to treat Rideout, it was & # 39; too late & # 39; and her leg had to be amputated from the knee.

Samantha Rideout, 30, from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, broke her right foot during a fall at home in September 2018. On the photo: Rideout walking on crutches after her leg is amputated

Advertisements

Samantha Rideout, 30, from St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, broke her right foot during a fall at home in September 2018. On the photo: Rideout walking on crutches after her leg is amputated

Rideout (photo) told the staff at the Health Sciences Center hospital in St. John's that she was worried about her foot because she has spina bifida, meaning she has little to no feeling in her feet

Rideout (photo) told the staff at the Health Sciences Center hospital in St. John's that she was worried about her foot because she has spina bifida, meaning she has little to no feeling in her feet

But Rideout (photo) was told that she had torn cartilage in her knee and was sent home

But Rideout (photo) was told that she had torn cartilage in her knee and was sent home

Rideout (left and right) told the staff at the Health Sciences Center hospital in St. John's that she was worried about her foot because she has spina bifida, meaning she has little to no feeling in her feet has. But she was told that she had torn cartilage in her knee and was sent home

Spina Bifida starts during pregnancy and occurs when the neural tube, a structure that forms the brain and spinal cord, cannot develop or does not close properly,

Sufferers often have walking and mobility problems because weak muscles or nerves in the legs do not work well.

Because Rideout has no feeling in her feet, she was particularly worried when she went down the stairs in her house last September.

Advertisements

In the emergency room at the Health Sciences Center hospital in St. John's, she told the staff that her foot hurt.

& # 39; I told them I had a pain in my foot, which I don't normally have, & # 39 ;, Rideout told DailyMail.com. & # 39; But they ignored me and just focused on my knee. & # 39;

The ER doctor performed X-rays on her knee, diagnosed her with torn cartilage, and told her to just keep her weight off her right leg.

However, when Rideout came home and changed from her shoes to her slippers, her big toe was black-blue and the bruise stretched out in the middle of her foot.

& # 39; I walked back to First Aid on slippers because my foot wouldn't fit in my shoes and the doctor said: & # 39; A specialist will call you in a few days & # 39;, & # 39; said Rideout. & # 39; No one has ever called me. & # 39;

Advertisements

Because no phone call ever came in, Rideout thought that this meant that her foot was not broken.

At the end of October a blister formed on her foot. The mother of the three assumed that her foot might be infected, so she went to the hospital for antibiotics.

Rideout went back to the hospital after her foot wouldn't fit in her shoes. She was told that someone would call her, but nobody ever did it. Pictured: Rideout and her three children at Christmas

Rideout went back to the hospital after her foot wouldn't fit in her shoes. She was told that someone would call her, but nobody ever did it. Pictured: Rideout and her three children at Christmas

Rideout went back to the hospital after her foot wouldn't fit in her shoes. She was told that someone would call her, but nobody ever did it. Pictured: Rideout and her three children at Christmas

At the end of October a blister formed on Rideout's foot and she received IV antibiotics. On the photo: Rideout & # 39; s foot on the day she broke it in September 2018

At the end of October a blister formed on Rideout's foot and she received IV antibiotics. On the photo: Rideout & # 39; s foot on the day she broke it in September 2018

A few weeks later she returned to the hospital but was told that her infection had disappeared, but she probably had the flu. On the photo: the foot of Rideout after he started to swell,
Advertisements

A few weeks later she returned to the hospital but was told that her infection had disappeared, but she probably had the flu. On the photo: the foot of Rideout after he started to swell,

At the end of October a blister formed on her foot and she received IV antibiotics. A few weeks later she returned to the hospital but was told that her infection had disappeared, but she probably had the flu. On the photo: Rideout & # 39; s foot on the day she broke in September 2018, left, and after it started to swell, anyway

& # 39; The doctor found multiple breaks and put me on IV antibiotics, & # 39; said Rideout. & # 39; He told me to come twice a day for daily treatments. & # 39;

It was a shock to Rideout because she had previously had blisters on her foot and in the past she had always on site at the hospital.

Antibiotics did not help and her condition deteriorated in mid-November.

Advertisements

& # 39; For a week I had a high fever, chills, I could not eat and my foot felt warm, & # 39; she said.

Rideout went back to the hospital, where the doctor performed blood work and X-rays, and told her that the infection had disappeared in her foot and that she probably had the flu.

Her fractured foot was properly diagnosed by an orthopedic surgeon who put her on new antibiotics to remove the infection. Pictured: her foot shortly before he was amputated

Her fractured foot was properly diagnosed by an orthopedic surgeon who put her on new antibiotics to remove the infection. Pictured: her foot shortly before he was amputated

Her fractured foot was properly diagnosed by an orthopedic surgeon who put her on new antibiotics to remove the infection. Pictured: her foot shortly before he was amputated

& # 39; I was suspicious & # 39 ;, she said. & # 39; I knew it wasn't normal to feel that way. Two days later my foot went from bad to extremely bad. & # 39;

The foot of Rideout became even redder and began to drain moisture.

She returned to the Health Sciences Center and returned to the same IV medicine.

Rideout was referred to a wound care clinic, where she met an orthopedic surgeon who took over her care.

& # 39; He immediately said, "You shouldn't walk on that foot" and put me on crutches, & # 39; said Rideout.

& # 39; He also told me that the IV antibiotics I was sitting with were wrong and brought me several antibiotics. & # 39;

Advertisements

In January, two months after her new treatment, the surgeon operated on her foot in an attempt to clear up the infection in her foot.

Although Rideout began to feel better, she began to feel sick again. When she went to her doctor, she was immediately hospitalized.

The surgeon ordered an MRI from Rideout & # 39; s foot and told her she had two options: half of her foot could be removed and she risked the infection coming back if she got a new blister, or her leg off the knee amputated down and eliminated the risk.

Rideout had surgery to clear the infection in January, but in March her surgeon told her that the infection could return unless she had amputated her leg. Pictured: Drive for the amputation

Rideout had surgery to clear the infection in January, but in March her surgeon told her that the infection could return unless she had amputated her leg. Pictured: Drive for the amputation

In March, the mother of the three had her right leg amputated from her knee down. On the photo: go out with her children after the amputation

In March, the mother of the three had her right leg amputated from her knee down. On the photo: go out with her children after the amputation

Advertisements

Rideout had surgery to clear the infection in January, but in March her surgeon told her that the infection could return unless she had amputated her leg. In March, the mother of the three had her right leg amputated from her knee down. Pictured: Drive before the amputation, left and with her children after the amputation, right

She says she now wants to raise awareness that they are your own best advocate when it comes to your health. On the photo: go out with her children after the amputation

She says she now wants to raise awareness that they are your own best advocate when it comes to your health. On the photo: go out with her children after the amputation

She says she now wants to raise awareness that they are your own best advocate when it comes to your health. On the photo: go out with her children after the amputation

& # 39; I was shocked and pretty much said to myself, "Don't cry for the doctor right now," & # 39; said Rideout. & # 39; I could not believe that that was what happened. & # 39;

Two days later she decided to undergo surgery to amputate the leg from the knee.

Advertisements

Rideout was in the hospital for two weeks before being discharged. She says it's hard to adjust to life as an amputee.

& # 39; The children have to help me with many things, I go down the stairs on my rear, & # 39; she said. & # 39; I just had to find a new way to do everything. & # 39;

Rideout says she wants to raise awareness that what happened to her can happen to anyone and can be your own lawyer when it comes to your health.

& # 39; Just because people are doctors does not mean that they are right and if you feel that something is wrong, talk to yourself or go to someone who listens to you and your best interest in have the hand, & # 39; she said.

Eastern Health, the first hospital to which Rideout went, told CBC News in a statement:

& # 39; When a person is present at a medical institution in Eastern Health, staff are trained to assess the patient's health problem and provide expert advice on the best options to meet these needs. Eastern Health takes every complaint seriously and will do everything it can to resolve a person's concerns. & # 39;

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health (t) canada