Advertisements
Victoria Maddock, 27, from Portsmouth, Hampshire, thought she had a whip in her eye, but woke up three days later without sight, leading to the diagnosis of glaucoma.

A woman who thought she had a whip in her eye revealed her fear after waking up three days later without a vision.

Advertisements

Victoria Maddock, 27, suffered a blurred vision in her right eye that she had tried to treat with eye drops.

But when she got the feeling she & # 39; by bottled bottoms & # 39; she immediately visited the local opticians.

She was diagnosed with iridocorneal endothelial (ICE) syndrome, with cornea swelling and iris changes.

An accumulation of pressure led her to develop glaucoma, a condition that is most common in people over 70 years of age, which shocked doctors.

If it was longer, Maddock was told that she could have lost sight in her right eye.

Maddock, from Portsmouth, Hampshire, was operated on twice to get fluid in her eye – the first time she didn't work.

Advertisements

Victoria Maddock, 27, from Portsmouth, Hampshire, thought she had a whip in her eye, but woke up three days later without sight, leading to the diagnosis of glaucoma.

Victoria Maddock, 27, from Portsmouth, Hampshire, thought she had a whip in her eye, but woke up three days later without sight, leading to the diagnosis of glaucoma.

Mrs. Maddock was diagnosed with iridocorneal endothelial (ICE) syndrome, corneal swelling and iris changes after being rushed to the hospital. An accumulation of pressure led to her developing glaucoma, and with the two conditions most common in people in the & # 39; 70, doctors were shocked, Maddock said. Pictured, her eye on an unknown date

Mrs. Maddock was diagnosed with iridocorneal endothelial (ICE) syndrome, corneal swelling and iris changes after being rushed to the hospital. An accumulation of pressure led to her developing glaucoma, and with the two conditions most common in people in the & # 39; 70, doctors were shocked, Maddock said. Pictured, her eye on an unknown date

Mrs. Maddock was diagnosed with iridocorneal endothelial (ICE) syndrome, corneal swelling and iris changes after being rushed to the hospital. An accumulation of pressure led to her developing glaucoma, and with the two conditions most common in people in the & # 39; 70, doctors were shocked, Maddock said. Pictured, her eye on an unknown date

Doctors have booked Maddock to undergo eye surgery in November 2018

Doctors have booked Maddock to undergo eye surgery in November 2018

Doctors have booked Maddock to undergo eye surgery in November 2018

Maddock, an administrative worker at a construction site, said: & # 39; If I had even left it days later, the pressure build-up would have completely disappeared from my right eye – it is not even thought of.

Advertisements

& # 39; People think that glaucoma is an old person's disease, but I am living proof that it can affect anyone at any age.

& # 39; I am just so grateful that I couldn't stand it any longer than having it checked by a specialist.

& # 39; My eye had played for a few days and I didn't think it was a thing.

WHAT IS IRIDOCORNEAL ENDOTHELIEL SYNDROME?

The characteristics of iridocorneal endothelial syndrome (ICE) include cornea swelling – the clear anterior part of the eye – iris abnormalities – the colored part of the eye containing the pupil – and a high risk of developing glaucoma.

The cornea has many layers, the inner layer consists of endothelial cells. These cells are vital to keep the cornea free because they pump out fluid from the cornea.

Advertisements

With ICE syndrome, the endothelial cells are abnormal and do not play their part. It leads to blurred vision.

The cells can also multiply in numbers and migrate to areas where they do not belong.

One of these areas is the eye drainage system, which is close to the edge of the cornea, which builds up pressure.

They can migrate to the iris and cause the pupil to be deformed, or sometimes even cause the iris to stretch so much that gaps occur.

ICE syndrome usually affects women between the ages of 30 and 50, usually in one eye, according to Bright Focus Foundation.

Advertisements

& # 39; One day I woke up and couldn't see at all from my right eye, it was like a thick film was placed over it. & # 39;

Mrs. Maddock, who had been wearing long-distance glasses from the age of 18, was soon told by experts that the pressure in her right eye was disturbingly high.

While the normal eye pressure varies from 12-22 millimeters of mercury (mmHg), the Maddock is measured 28 mmHg – above 22 mmHg as high.

Opticians stated that she would go directly to the Queen Alexandra Hospital in the city, where she soon got the ICE syndrome.

ICE is when abnormal cells in the cornea, the film across the front of the eye, migrate across the eye to the iris, the colored part of the eye.

Advertisements

It affects 480,000 people in the UK, according to Fight For Sight, among women between 30 and 50 years old. The statistics for the US are unclear.

Maddock said: "Towards the end of the first review, I was surrounded by a group of doctors who all insisted on my gaze because it was so unusual to see ICE in someone my age."

Symptoms include cornea swelling, iris abnormalities, and a high risk of developing glaucoma due to pressure build-up.

Glaucoma is when the optic nerve that connects the eye with the brain is damaged by an accumulation of fluid in the front of the eye.

The risk of glaucoma increases with age. It is most common among people over 70 and affects 60 million people worldwide.

Maddock said: & # 39; It was pretty nerve-racking. No one could believe that I had glaucoma so young. A doctor said she had read about things like mine before. & # 39;

Mrs. Maddock, who has been wearing long-distance glasses since she was eighteen, told experts that the pressure in her right eye was worryingly high. Pictured before

Mrs. Maddock, who has been wearing long-distance glasses since she was eighteen, told experts that the pressure in her right eye was worryingly high. Pictured before

Mrs. Maddock, who has been wearing long-distance glasses since she was eighteen, told experts that the pressure in her right eye was worryingly high. Pictured before

Mrs. Maddock, pictured with her mother, said the ordeal was nerve-racking

Mrs. Maddock, pictured with her mother, said the ordeal was nerve-racking

Mrs. Maddock, pictured with her mother, said the ordeal was nerve-racking

Just when Mrs. Maddock thought her life was going back to normal, she had to return three months after the first time for more eye surgery when she woke up again with blurred vision
Advertisements

Just when Mrs. Maddock thought her life was going back to normal, she had to return three months after the first time for more eye surgery when she woke up again with blurred vision

Just when Mrs. Maddock thought her life was going back to normal, she had to return three months after the first time for more eye surgery when she woke up again with blurred vision

It is not possible to stop the progression of ICE syndrome, according to Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center.

Treatment is usually aimed at managing the glaucoma to reduce pressure in the eye.

Because her eye pressure was as high as 36 mmHg, doctors booked Maddock for a trabeculectomy on November 20, 2018.

Advertisements

The procedure removes part of the iris, making it easier for fluid to drain – for which Maddock had a general anesthetic because of her & # 39; paralyzing fear of needles & # 39 ;.

At first it seemed like the operation was a success, with Mrs. Maddock taking two weeks off to fix her eyes before she could expose it to natural light.

Relieved to regain her sight, she got hit again three months later when she woke up in the same frightening scenario.

Maddock said: & I started getting my life back on track when I woke up again with the same symptoms.

& # 39; I didn't waste a moment by going straight to the emergency eye care clinic.

Advertisements

& # 39; There doctors confirmed that the cells in my eye were starting to migrate back to my iris, effectively reversing the operation. & # 39;

Just a week later, Maddock was back on the operating table in the same hospital, where surgeons repeated the procedure, but under local anesthesia.

Maddock announces the awareness of glaucoma in young people because they & # 39; never in a million years & # 39; thought this would happen to her. Pictured with her boyfriend on an unknown date

Maddock announces the awareness of glaucoma in young people because they & # 39; never in a million years & # 39; thought this would happen to her. Pictured with her boyfriend on an unknown date

Maddock announces the awareness of glaucoma in young people because they & # 39; never in a million years & # 39; thought this would happen to her. Pictured with her boyfriend on an unknown date

She said: & # 39; Because I couldn't see, it wasn't half as bad as I thought it would be, despite my needle phobia.

Fortunately, Maddock's eye has remained stable since the second operation.

Determined to help others with the same condition, Maddock is conducting eye research charity Fight for Sight to raise awareness of the prevalence of glaucoma, especially among younger people.

She is campaigning for more people to realize that regular eye tests are needed – at least once every two years.

She said: & # 39; I had never thought that this had happened to me in a million years.

& # 39; I wear my glasses to watch TV and go to the cinema and that is it.

& # 39; Now I have insisted that all my friends and family have their eyes checked as quickly as possible. It doesn't matter if you have 20/20 vision or if you are as blind as a bat – just go. & # 39;

According to the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), glaucoma is so rare in young people that the indicator of the Public Health Outcomes Framework on avoidable loss of sight due to glaucoma only starts counting people when they are over 40 years old.

RNIB & Lead Specialist for Eye Health, Dr. Louise Gow, said: & # 39; Glaucoma usually develops in older adults, usually with a close family history or from certain risk groups such as an African-Caribbean ethnic background.

& Although it is possible to develop primary glaucoma for the open corner, the most common form of adult glaucoma, before the age of 40 – it is very rare. & # 39;

WHAT IS GLAUCOMA?

Glaucoma is a condition that can affect vision, usually due to pressure build-up in the eye.

It often affects both eyes, usually to varying degrees. One eye can develop glaucoma faster than the other.

The eyeball contains a fluid called room water, which is constantly produced by the eye, with any excess permeable tubes.

Glaucoma develops when the fluid cannot drain properly and pressure builds up, known as the intraocular pressure.

This can damage the optic nerve (which connects the eye with the brain) and the nerve fibers of the retina (the light-sensitive nerve tissue that forms the back of the eye).

In England and Wales, it is estimated that more than 500,000 people have glaucoma, but many more people may not know that they have the condition. There are 60 million patients around the world.

Glaucoma can be treated with eye drops, laser treatment or surgery. But early diagnosis is important because any damage to the eyes cannot be reversed. The treatment is aimed at keeping the situation under control and minimizing future damage.

If not treated, glaucoma can cause visual disturbances. But if it is diagnosed and treated early enough, further vision damage can be prevented.

Source: NHS Choices

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health