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Woman, 24, was paralyzed from the neck down hours after she woke up with a sore neck

A woman who woke up with a sore neck and was paralyzed from the neck just hours later was treated in Oman.

Helen Fincham thought she had just slept uncomfortably when she woke up with a pain in August 2016, 21 years old. By the afternoon she had trouble breathing.

Later that afternoon Miss Fincham became paralyzed from the neck and she could not even “wipe her own tears.”

Doctors were stunned by Miss Fincham’s decline until months later, tests revealed that she was suffering from the rare neurological disorder of transversal myelitis.

After months of rehabilitation, Miss Fincham, of Bridgend in Wales, became able to “squeeze” her hands. This was followed by small arm movements and finally one helped push up.

Mrs. Fincham’s ordeal led to her being invited to the Royal Garden Party in June, where she met Prince Charles.

The Prince of Wales was so moved by her story that his staff contacted him to recommend a doctor who could help. Miss Fincham, now 24, wanted to raise £ 10,000 ($ 12,051) for his treatment in Oman.

In June, she posted on Instagram that she went to the nation for treatment and told her followers that she was “so grateful.”

Helen Fincham woke up with a sore neck and was paralyzed from the neck down hours later. It is shown for the test

She was rushed to the hospital, where doctors were stunned for months by her decline. Tests eventually showed that she suffered from transversal myelitis

She was rushed to the hospital, where doctors were stunned for months by her decline. Tests eventually showed that she suffered from transversal myelitis

Helen Fincham (pictured left) woke up with a sore neck and was paralyzed from the neck hours later. She was rushed to the hospital (see right), where doctors were stunned for months by her decline. Tests eventually showed that she suffered from transversal myelitis

Miss Fincham was invited to attend the Royal Garden Party, where she met Prince Charles (photo). The Prince of Wales was so moved by her story that his staff contacted him to recommend a doctor who could help. She is now fundraising for treatment in a recovery center in Oman

Miss Fincham was invited to attend the Royal Garden Party, where she met Prince Charles (photo). The Prince of Wales was so moved by her story that his staff contacted him to recommend a doctor who could help. She is now fundraising for treatment in a recovery center in Oman

Miss Fincham was invited to attend the Royal Garden Party, where she met Prince Charles (photo). The Prince of Wales was so moved by her story that his staff contacted him to recommend a doctor who could help. She is now fundraising for treatment in a recovery center in Oman

Miss Fincham woke up with a stiff neck after enjoying a day at the beach with her niece. A few hours later she lay on her bed and tried to relieve a tight chest.

“I’ve never been sick in my life, so I knew something was really wrong,” Mrs. Fincham said.

“I was struggling to breathe and suddenly I had pain in my arm,” The mirror reported.

Miss Fincham called her doctor, who told her to call an ambulance immediately.

Paramedics arrived and tried to help Miss Fincham stand alone for her to fall into their arms.

Once in the hospital, doctors asked her parents if she had used drugs while they were testing to find out what was wrong.

“Everyone had no idea [as to] how my complete paralysis came out of nowhere in less than an hour or so, “she said earlier Wales Online.

After the diagnosis, Miss Fincham spent a year in rehabilitation at Rockwood Hospital in Cardiff.

“Everything was taken away from me at the age of 21,” she said. “I would cry even at night, but couldn’t wipe my own tears.

Miss Fincham now lives in an adapted apartment on the ground floor, where she is cared for seven hours a day.

After months of rehabilitation at Rockwood Hospital in Cardiff, Miss Fincham joined forces. She travels once a week to the private spinal cord injury center Neurokinex in Bristol for physiotherapy (photo). A five-week course costs £ 700 ($ 843)

After months of rehabilitation at Rockwood Hospital in Cardiff, Miss Fincham joined forces. She travels once a week to the private spinal cord injury center Neurokinex in Bristol for physiotherapy (photo). A five-week course costs £ 700 ($ 843)

After months of rehabilitation at Rockwood Hospital in Cardiff, Miss Fincham joined forces. She travels once a week to the private spinal cord injury center Neurokinex in Bristol for physiotherapy (photo). A five-week course costs £ 700 ($ 843)

Miss Fincham (shown before the test) is 'adamant', she will get better with the right treatment

Miss Fincham (shown before the test) is 'adamant', she will get better with the right treatment

For now, she depends on a wheelchair to move around

For now, she depends on a wheelchair to move around

Miss Fincham (shown on the left for the test) is ‘adamant’, she will get better with the right treatment. For now she is dependent on a wheelchair to move around (see right)

WHAT IS TRANSVERSE MYELITIS?

Transversal myelitis is a neurological disorder that occurs when both sides of a part of the spinal cord become inflamed.

This damages the material myelin, which covers nerve cells.

Transversal myelitis interrupts the messages that the spinal cord sends through the body.

This can cause pain, muscle weakness, sensory problems, incontinence and even paralysis.

It is thought that around 300 new cases are diagnosed each year in the UK and 1,400 in the US, statistics show.

The condition can be caused by infections, conditions such as multiple sclerosis or autoimmune diseases.

IV steroids in the spine can reduce inflammation.

Antiviral drugs and pain killers can also help.

Physiotherapy and occupational therapy can help people regain their strength and perform daily activities.

Most patients recover at least partially.

Source: Mayo Clinic

“I can move my arms enough to feed myself, but I can’t cut food or prepare anything like that,” she said.

Miss Fincham relies on a caretaker to wash, dress and move her.

Once a week, she travels to the private Neurokinex spinal cord injury center in Bristol for physiotherapy, with a five-week course that costs £ 700 ($ 843).

‘Adamant’ she can get better with the right treatment, Miss Fincham launched a JustGiving page to raise money for treatment in a recovery center in Oman.

This happened after she met Prince Charles during the Royal Garden Party during her first trip to London.

Miss Fincham was invited by the charity Bridgend Coalition of Disabled People.

Speaking of the meeting, Miss Fincham said BBC Radio Wales: “He said he was really stripped that it had happened and asked:” would I ever get better? “

“I answered” no “because that’s what I was told.”

Once home, the Prince of Wales’ caretaker called Miss Fincham to tell her about the ‘impact’ her story had on him and to recommend ‘Dr Ali’.

Miss Fincham met the doctor, who told her about a recovery center in Oman.

“He and I are both adamant that I will get well,” she wrote. give here.

Miss Fincham's invitation to the Royal Garden Party was her first trip to London

Miss Fincham's invitation to the Royal Garden Party was her first trip to London

Miss Fincham’s invitation to the Royal Garden Party was her first trip to London

Although she is making progress, Miss Fincham admits that she still has “bad days.”

WHO IS DR ALI? THE NATUROPAD CARRIED BY THE PRINCE OF WALES

Dr. Mosaraf Ali is a naturopath and ‘expert in Ayurvedic medicine’.

The ‘medic’ claims that he has studied both complementary and traditional medicine. In 1998 he opened the Integrated Medical Center in London.

He has since written eight books and has columns in You magazine and Top Santé.

According to his website, Dr. Ali practices ‘integrated medicine’, including yoga, massage therapy, acupuncture and aromatherapy.

He claims that he can use these techniques to treat everything from eczema and flu to rheumatoid arthritis, while also helping to “rehabilitate a stroke.”

Dr. Ali even claims that he has helped paralyzed people go through “a special massage designed to improve blood flow to the brain”, The Guardian reported.

The naturopath has received notes from HRH Prince of Wales, Morgan Freeman, Sylvester Stallone, Samuel L Jackson, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Kate Moss.

He would also have treated Michael Douglas, Sir Richard Branson, Boris Becker and Sir Michael Caine.

The deceased Tara Palmer-Tomkinson is even quoted as “calling him the eighth wonder of the world” after Dr. Ali had treated her for her cocaine habit.

In addition to being the “therapist” of the Prince of Wales, Dr. Ali was hired by the Royal Lady the Duchess of Cornwall to help her “regain energy” and stop smoking.

But Dr. Ali was confronted with controversy in 2008 when an ex-patient took legal action on “negligent” care.

The patient claims that Dr. Ali said he would help him walk again after two strokes had left him in a wheelchair.

The ‘medic’ is said to have relieved pain and cold in the man’s legs. He was later diagnosed with a chronic lack of blood flow and must have amputated both limbs mid-thigh.

The General Medical Council (GMC), which grants doctors in the UK licenses, said earlier that Ali is not in their records.

His medical degree is said to have been earned in 1980 at Patrice Lumumba Peoples’ Friendship University in Moscow.

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