Within the Himalayan tribe SWIFE-SWAPPING the Drokpas people

These impressive portraits show some of the remaining members of the Drokpa people, dressed in traditional costumes

These dazzling portraits show some of the remaining members of an ancient tribe known as the Aryans of the Himalayas, who traditionally engage in the exchange of wives and celebrate public displays of affection.

The Drokpa people live in small tribes along the Indus River in the Jammu and Kashmir region of northern India.

Drokpa means Aryan or white skin in Ladakhi, and it is believed that the remaining 3,000 members are descended from a group of soldiers long lost from Alexander the Great's army, according to photographer Aman Chotani.

These impressive portraits show some of the remaining members of the Drokpa people, dressed in traditional costumes

These impressive portraits show some of the remaining members of the Drokpa people, dressed in traditional costumes

The women of the ancient Drokpa tribe wear wool dresses, goat skin capes and are adorned with flower headdresses.

The women of the ancient Drokpa tribe wear wool dresses, goat skin capes and are adorned with flower headdresses.

The women of the ancient Drokpa tribe wear wool dresses, goat skin capes and are adorned with flower headdresses.

An elderly member of the tribe is seen wearing a cape of goat skin over her traditional dress, as well as handmade jewelry

An elderly member of the tribe is seen wearing a cape of goat skin over her traditional dress, as well as handmade jewelry

An elderly member of the tribe is seen wearing a cape of goat skin over her traditional dress, as well as handmade jewelry

An elderly member of the tribe is seen wearing a cape of goat skin over her traditional dress, as well as handmade jewelry

An elderly member of the tribe is seen wearing a cape of goat skin over her traditional dress, as well as handmade jewelry

He photographed some of the remaining members of the ancient tribe, including women in traditional clothing, for his book The Last Avatar, to document Indian tribes and their culture before they disappear forever.

Chotani, who is an Indian, says that Drokpas, who still uses the ancient Sanskrit swastika symbol, which has been corrupted by the Nazis as a propaganda tool, says that fashion is an important part of the tribe's culture.

He captured portraits of women in traditional dresses, headdresses and capes of goatskin, and adorned with intricate hand-made jewelery, flowers, feathers and seashells.

"All this is to attract a partner and identify enough to be seen and chosen by a suitor," he said.

Fashion is an important part of the tribe's culture and women dress up to attract a partner and be chosen by a suitor

Fashion is an important part of the tribe's culture and women dress up to attract a partner and be chosen by a suitor

Fashion is an important part of the tribe's culture and women dress up to attract a partner and be chosen by a suitor

Indian photographer Aman Chotani photographed some of the remaining members of the ancient tribe for his book

Indian photographer Aman Chotani photographed some of the remaining members of the ancient tribe for his book

The photographer's book, The Last Avatar, aims to document the Indian tribes and their culture before they disappear forever.

The photographer's book, The Last Avatar, aims to document the Indian tribes and their culture before they disappear forever.

Indian photographer Aman Chotani photographed some of the remaining members of the ancient tribe for his book

Men from the Drokpa tribe usually wear dresses or wool pants, but also wear colorful helmets with flowers

Men from the Drokpa tribe usually wear dresses or wool pants, but also wear colorful helmets with flowers

Men from the Drokpa tribe usually wear dresses or wool pants, but also wear colorful helmets with flowers

However, he says that they do not share nor follow normal social norms.

"The public displays of affection are normal and encouraged in the community of Drokpa, as was the concept of exchange of wives," he said.

"The exchange of wives and the display of public affection were essentially prohibited by authoritative figures who did not believe that the behavior of the Drokpa was civilized."

"Due to this, the communities of Drokpa have stopped with their public displays when the outsiders were close, but retake their passionate nature when they remove the eyes of others."

Chotani added that Drokpas lives a life easier and freer & # 39; that most of the surviving ancient tribes and most work as farmers.

He said: "For survival purposes, they are commonly known as agricultural farmers who plant fruits and vegetables in rich gardens in which they pride themselves.

A woman of the tribe, who lives along the Indus River in India, is seen with intricate hand-made silver jewels

A woman of the tribe, who lives along the Indus River in India, is seen with intricate hand-made silver jewels

A woman of the tribe, who lives along the Indus River in India, is seen with intricate hand-made silver jewels

Chotani says that public displays of affection are normal and encouraged in the community of Drokpa, which now only has about 3,000 people

Chotani says that public displays of affection are normal and encouraged in the community of Drokpa, which now only has about 3,000 people

Chotani says that public displays of affection are normal and encouraged in the community of Drokpa, which now only has about 3,000 people

Chotani says that public displays of affection are normal and encouraged in the community of Drokpa, which now only has about 3,000 people

Chotani says that public displays of affection are normal and encouraged in the community of Drokpa, which now only has about 3,000 people

But he says that the exchange of wives and the display of public affection were prohibited by authoritative figures who did not believe that the behavior of the Drokpa was "civilized".

But he says that the exchange of wives and the display of public affection were prohibited by authoritative figures who did not believe that the behavior of the Drokpa was "civilized".

But he says that the exchange of wives and the display of public affection were prohibited by authoritative figures who did not believe that the behavior of the Drokpa was "civilized".

But he says that the exchange of wives and the display of public affection were prohibited by authoritative figures who did not believe that the behavior of the Drokpa was "civilized".

But he says that the exchange of wives and the display of public affection were prohibited by authoritative figures who did not believe that the behavior of the Drokpa was "civilized".

"These gardens should be well cared for and often, since the product that springs from the soil and the flowers of the trees is equivalent to money.

"The Drokpas sell their sweet and crunchy products as it is their main source of income and pride."

In general, the Drokpas are a town that offers the freedom to do what they want while they enjoy music and dance at festivals, as much as they enjoy their brightly colored ornaments and the presence of others & # 39; ;

Mr. Chotani also explained the tribe's links to the use of the swastika in Nazi Germany.

"In theory, the Drokpas, in their originality, were a group of soldiers long lost from the army of Alexander the Great," he said.

"One of the main theories about the original Drokpas is their use of the Sanskrit swastika, concluding that Hitler adapted the symbol and modernized the swastika for his own political gain and propaganda.

"This unique piece of suggestive evidence encouraged the Germans to widely accept the Indo-Aryans as their ancestral ancestors."

The majority of the members of the tribe are agricultural farmers who grow fruits and vegetables and take pride in their gardens and produce

The majority of the members of the tribe are agricultural farmers who grow fruits and vegetables and take pride in their gardens and produce

The majority of the members of the tribe are agricultural farmers who grow fruits and vegetables and take pride in their gardens and produce

"Drokpas is a town that has the freedom to do what they want while they enjoy music and dance at festivals, as much as they enjoy their ornaments of bright colors and the presence of others," added the photographer.

Chotani added that Drokpas lives a life easier and freer & # 39; that most of the surviving ancient tribes and the majority work as farmers

Chotani added that Drokpas lives a life easier and freer & # 39; that most of the surviving ancient tribes and the majority work as farmers

Chotani added that Drokpas lives a life easier and freer & # 39; that most of the surviving ancient tribes and the majority work as farmers

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