Will THIS Covid Vaccine End The Common Cold?

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Will THIS Covid Vaccine End The Common Cold? Scientists are developing a $ 1 injection that can protect people from other coronaviruses

  • Researchers at the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech used a platform that inserts a piece of synthesized viral DNA into genetically altered E. coli.
  • The bacteria, which is now a host for the virus, creates the spike protein on the surface that helps the body recognize them so that it can build antibodies
  • The team tested its candidate vaccine on pigs infected with a form of coronavirus known as swine epidemic diarrhea virus.
  • The immunization did not completely prevent infection, but it prevented the pigs from developing some of the most severe symptoms of the virus
  • Scientists hope the vaccine can fight existing and future coronaviruses, including the virus that causes COVID-19 and even the common cold.

Researchers in Virginia are developing a vaccine that can protect people against all forms of coronaviruses.

A team from the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech saw promising results in their candidate, preventing pigs from becoming sick with a swine coronavirus.

The candidate would help the body fight existing and future strains of coronavirus, including the pathogen that causes COVID-19 and even the common cold.

The team says it will be faster and easier to distribute than other vaccines, as well as cheaper with doses available for just $ 1.

Researchers at the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech used a platform that puts a piece of synthesized viral DNA into genetically altered E. coli, creating the spike protein on the surface that helps the body recognize them so it can build antibodies.  Pictured: Dr.  Steven Zeichner from UVA Health

Researchers at the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech used a platform that puts a piece of synthesized viral DNA into genetically altered E. coli, creating the spike protein on the surface that helps the body recognize them so it can build antibodies. Pictured: Dr. Steven Zeichner from UVA Health

The team saw successful results in a test of its vaccine candidate on pigs infected with a form of coronavirus known as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.  Pictured: Dr.  Xiang-Jin Meng of Virginia Tech

The team saw successful results in a test of its vaccine candidate on pigs infected with a form of coronavirus known as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.  Pictured: Dr.  Xiang-Jin Meng of Virginia Tech

The team saw successful results in a test of its vaccine candidate on pigs infected with a form of coronavirus known as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus. Pictured: Dr. Xiang-Jin Meng of Virginia Tech

“What we want to do is think about the future and try to find vaccines in the future that might protect against variants that are starting to emerge,” said Dr. Steven Zeichner of UVA Health. NBC 12

Zeichner and his partner, Dr. Xiang-Jin Meng, of Virginia Tech, began their research to test their vaccine candidate on pigs, which have a similar immunology to humans.

Their candidate encodes a part of the coronavirus known as the spike proteins, also known as the fusion peptide.

“We saw that there was a part of the virus, the fusion peptide, that helps the virus to fuse with the cells it is going to infect,” Zeichner explained to NBC 12.

“That seems to release the genetic information into the future cells, so what we did was say,” Let’s try to make a vaccine for that. “

The fusion peptide resides in the same site of the virus that caused COVID-19 and one of its distant relatives, the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv).

PEDv belongs to the family of coronaviruses, but specifically affects pigs and causes diarrhea and vomiting.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), between 50 and 100 percent of piglets infected with PEDv die.

For their study, the team vaccinated pigs against PEDv and then exposed them to the virus.

The immunization did not completely prevent infection, but it did prevent the pigs from developing some of the most severe symptoms of the virus.

The vaccine used a platform that obtains a piece of synthesized viral DNA in genetically altered E. coli, the Staunton News Leader

The bacteria, which now host the virus, creates fusion peptides on the surface that allow the body to recognize them so that it can build antibodies.

Vaccines against cholera and whooping cough (whooping cough) are already using this platform, which means that it could be produced in factories in low- to middle-income countries around the world.

It also means that the vaccine can be easily transported to rural and disadvantaged communities in the US and stored easily.

“With the emergence of several SARS-CoV-2 variants, a vaccine targeting a conserved region of all coronaviruses, such as the fusion peptide, could potentially lead to a broadly protective candidate vaccine,” Meng told the News Leader.

“A vaccine like that would, if successful, be of great value against variant virus strains.”

The team says the initial results are promising, but more research needs to be done, including human trials.

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