Will I be brave enough to invest in the next time the stock market falls by 30%?

The collapse of Lehman Brothers ten years ago saw employees leave their office in London with their possessions, but it as banks such as Barclays, Lloyds, Halifax and RBS that worried Britons

Imagine sitting in your desk in the morning and thinking: & # 39; I wonder if Barclays is really going bankrupt today, or maybe Lloyds? & # 39;

Ten years ago that was what we were doing at This is Money.

It seems almost unthinkable now – as if it were a strange, vivid dream – but when I am asked to throw my thoughts back to the financial crisis, I think of that.

The collapse of Lehman Brothers ten years ago saw employees leave their office in London with their possessions, but it as banks such as Barclays, Lloyds, Halifax and RBS that worried Britons

The collapse of Lehman Brothers ten years ago saw employees leave their office in London with their possessions, but it as banks such as Barclays, Lloyds, Halifax and RBS that worried Britons

During many of those days we really thought that something we could never imagine was about to happen: one of the biggest banks in Britain would go bankrupt.

In the next few days, many opinions will be thrown, because Saturday, September 15, marks ten years after the day that Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy.

Leaving Lehman, the banks might have learned the lesson that they could not trust someone to step in to save them, but unfortunately it has failed spectacularly.

The credit crunch that started in 2007 was already a financial crisis at the time, but things got really accelerated because we discovered that Lehman was not a player who could fail elsewhere with limited consequences.

Instead, it snowed and panic set in motion, with a system that was so intertwined with one another and corrupted toxic finances that no one was considered safe.

And so British savers noticed whether Lloyds, Halifax, Barclays or RBS would follow Northern Rock and close their doors.

In the end, they were all saved in one way or another and savers did not lose their money, but the chain of events that triggered the financial crisis still costs us a lot of money now.

Countries saddled with debt from saving banks have had to cut spending. In the United Kingdom, this has contributed to everything from potholes that can not be fixed to higher train fares, the benefits that are saved, the school money that shoots up, police work and health care.

And of course there is the base rate, which just last year was just above 0.5 percent.

The stock exchange of FTSE All Share UK had already dropped significantly compared to the peak in October 2007 in September 2008 and then continued to fall, but if you had invested while the financial crisis was raging, you would already have earned a lot of money

The stock exchange of FTSE All Share UK had already dropped significantly compared to the peak in October 2007 in September 2008 and then continued to fall, but if you had invested while the financial crisis was raging, you would already have earned a lot of money

The stock exchange of FTSE All Share UK had already dropped significantly compared to the peak in October 2007 in September 2008 and then continued to fall, but if you had invested while the financial crisis was raging, you would already have earned a lot of money

Nevertheless, many of the retrospectives from a decade ago that are sent to us are also focused on how people could have made money.

The investment sector would like to point out that statistics such as Hargreaves Lansdown that invested £ 10,000 in the FTSE All-Share on the eve of Lehman's collapse would now be worth £ 21,350, with reinvested dividends.

There would be more money to be made for those who had bought it when the stock market really began to fill in early 2009.

The problem, however, is how many of us would have done this?

As often as you are advised to be greedy when others are scared, it is a difficult rule to follow if you are worried that the financial system could collapse.

I wish I had all the money I had invested when the stock market fell 30 to 40 percent during the financial crisis, but I did not.

I wonder if I am brave enough next time.

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