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Wild mountain gorillas are spotted in water - splashing in a stream and sweeping their arms through the liquid - just like people. When splashing, the monkeys assume what the researchers think of a & # 39; play face & # 39; name and stick out their tongue, pictured

Wild mountain gorillas are spotted in water – splashing in a stream and sweeping their arms through the liquid – just like people.

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Recordings of game activity were made in a national park in Uganda by researchers who studied the impact of ecotourism on gorillas.

The experts think the gorillas & # 39; s are splashing around to get exercise, learn about their environment and also just to have fun.

When splashing, the monkeys assume what the researchers think of a & # 39; play face & # 39; call and stick their tongue out.

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Wild mountain gorillas are spotted in water - splashing in a stream and sweeping their arms through the liquid - just like people. When splashing, the monkeys assume what the researchers think of a & # 39; play face & # 39; name and stick out their tongue, pictured

Wild mountain gorillas are spotted in water – splashing in a stream and sweeping their arms through the liquid – just like people. When splashing, the monkeys assume what the researchers think of a & # 39; play face & # 39; name and stick out their tongue, pictured

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WHY DO GORILLAS PLAY IN WATER?

Wild mountain gorillas are spotted in the water, just like people.

Researchers saw them splashing in a stream and wiping their arms through the water.

With water play, the gorillas can train, develop muscles and learn about their environment.

Experts think that the activity can also be fun for the monkeys.

Western lowland gorillas are also known to splash around water.

Some researchers believe that this represents a show of power.

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A video from Dallas Zoo, made in 2017, also showed Zola, a male western lowland gorilla dancing & # 39; in a swimming pool.

He spanned himself and splashed the water with his arms.

Playing behavior was recorded by primatologist Raquel Costa of the University of Kyoto in Japan, who accidentally discovered the behavior while studying the impact of ecotourism on wild mountain gorillas in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda.

She first saw one play in water on January 12, 2018, when she saw a 15-year-old male gorilla named Kanywani who gently moved his arm back and forth in a stream.

Unfortunately Costa did not have a camera to record the behavior, which lasted only about 37 seconds in total, with Kanywani taking a break to drink.

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Two weeks later, however, Costa was able to record the play, when a nine-year-old woman named Kamara was seen while having fun while the mess was near the stream.

& # 39; Kamara moved and then suddenly fell on the surface of the water and began to splash the water with vigorous twisting and sweeping movements with her arms diagonally across the surface of the water, & Costa wrote in her newspaper.

Kamara did this 21 times in a 17-minute period and was even accompanied by another woman, Kanyindo, for a while.

& # 39; As she splashed her arms over the water, Kamara showed a play face with her mouth barely open and tongue out, & # 39; Mrs. Costa.

Towards the end of the piece & # 39; splashing wet her hair, the movements and water turbulence caused by her actions were so powerful. & # 39;

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A third specimen of play in the stream was observed about a week later, when Costa saw a seven-year-old man named Kabunga and his arms turned about five seconds on the surface of the water.

The study offers one of the few studies of solitary play behavior in animals – with most previous studies focused on social or group play activities that help animals sharpen their social skills.

Nevertheless, solitary playing behavior can be just as important, allowing animals to learn physical skills and explore their environment, Costa said New scientist.

Recordings of game activity, pictured, were made in a national park in Uganda by researchers who studied the impact of ecotourism on gorillas.

Recordings of the playing activity, pictured, were made in a national park in Uganda by researchers who studied the impact of ecotourism on gorillas.

Recordings of game activity, pictured, were made in a national park in Uganda by researchers who studied the impact of ecotourism on gorillas.

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Kanywani and his colleagues play around in their stream and develop & # 39; muscles and skills & # 39 ;, she added.

The findings destroy reports from a 2016 evaluation that had found no evidence of mountain gorillas engaged in water play – either in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park or in another population in the Virunga National Park in DR Congo.

According to Costa, fellow & # 39; s who studied the Virunga population have also seen gorillas play in the water.

In addition, it is also known that western lowland gorillas are splashing around water – and according to some researchers a show is in force.

A video from Dallas Zoo, taken in 2017, also showed an adult male western lowland gorilla known as Zola who appears to be dancing & # 39; in a children's pool, spinning around and splashing the water with his arms.

In addition to being a learning experience, playing can also offer & # 39; the pure pleasure of doing something fun & # 39 ;, Costa told the new scientist.

& # 39; I do feel that animals with a certain cognitive capacity will do something just because they enjoy it, & # 39; she added.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal primates.

Playing behavior was recorded by primatologist Raquel Costa of the University of Kyoto in Japan, who accidentally discovered the behavior while studying the impact of ecotourism on wild mountain gorillas in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda.

Playing behavior was recorded by primatologist Raquel Costa of the University of Kyoto in Japan, who accidentally discovered the behavior while studying the impact of ecotourism on wild mountain gorillas in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda.

Playing behavior was recorded by primatologist Raquel Costa of the University of Kyoto in Japan, who accidentally discovered the behavior while studying the impact of ecotourism on wild mountain gorillas in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda.

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