Wild moment, a freshwater crocodile gallops down a back road in the Northern Territory

0

Extraordinary moment when a freshwater crocodile is startled by a nature guide and GALLOPS over a road

  • Extraordinary video captures a freshwater crocodile galloping down a road
  • The crocodile traveled across a pasture to the Bullo River, Northern Territory
  • Crocodiles will use a ‘high gait’ to move across land at impressive speeds

The extraordinary moment when a freshwater crocodile gallops along a remote back road has been captured on camera.

Nature guide Karla came across the freshwater crocodile last week while walking across a pasture to the Bullo River in the Northern Territory.

She explained to her followers on Instagram that when crocodiles startle on land, they leap into a quick gallop and sprint towards the water.

Nature guide Karla saw the freshwater crocodile walking across a pasture to the Bullo River in the Northern Territory last week

Nature guide Karla saw the freshwater crocodile walking across a pasture to the Bullo River in the Northern Territory last week

The five-foot-long crocodile was caught crossing the road slowly and then flattened to the ground as Karla approached.

In the video, the wary crocodile suddenly turns and sprints in the opposite direction, lifting its legs and tail high above the grass.

“Crocs are much more nimble on land than people realize,” Karla wrote on Instagram.

She explained that the reptile used a ‘high gait’ gait to move across land, holding the body high so their belly and tail are off the ground.

She was able to capture the crocodile with a 'high walk' gait to dash across the road and sprint into nearby grass by holding its legs and tail high off the ground.

She was able to capture the crocodile with a 'high walk' gait to dash across the road and sprint into nearby grass by holding its legs and tail high off the ground.

She was able to catch the crocodile with a ‘high loop’ gait to sprint across the road and sprint into nearby grass by keeping its legs and tail high off the ground.

Karla said track markings indicate that crocodiles can travel significant distances, especially at the start of the dry season, from May to October.

Freshwater crocodiles will use the galloping gait to move between pools of water, at speeds of up to 18 kilometers per hour.

Viewers of the extraordinary clip shared their amazement at the crocodile’s remarkable speed and unusual gait.

‘Definitely not the way I expected it to go away,’ wrote one user.

Karla (pictured) explained to her Instagram followers that freshwater crocodiles gallop between pools of water in search of a permanent home in the dry season

Karla (pictured) explained to her Instagram followers that freshwater crocodiles gallop between pools of water in search of a permanent home in the dry season

Karla (pictured) explained to her Instagram followers that freshwater crocodiles gallop between pools of water in search of a permanent home in the dry season

“Wow, that’s so cool and scary at the same time,” commented another.

One user said they were surprised the reptile was not trying to attack Karla.

She replied to their comment, explaining that freshwater crocodiles posed no threat to people on land.

“The only way people get bitten by fresh vegetables is if you try to catch them and don’t know what you’re doing,” she said.

‘A salt in the water is a different story, a crocodile out of the water is out of their element.’

FACTS ABOUT FRESHWATER CROCODILES

The species is unique to Australia and only occurs in the tropics of Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia

Their preferred habitat is upstream freshwater billabongs, swamps and rivers, but will travel to tidal waters if not threatened by Estuarine crocodiles

The crocodile is smaller than saltwater crocodiles and has narrower snouts and sharp teeth that are used to hunt insects and fish

They use a galloping gait to move between pools of water and reach speeds of 18 km / h, but this is exhausting for the crocodiles that are quickly exhausted

Like the Estuarine crocodile, the freshwater species is an ambush hunter, lying motionless on the water’s edge so that small creatures can get close

Freshwater crocodiles can live to be 40-60 years and possibly even 100 years old

Source: Billabong Sanctuary

Advertisement