Widow says her uncle can move into her house on release from prison for her husband’s 1996 murder

Manzoor Qadar, 60, depicted in an undated mugshot

A New York City widow has said her uncle can move in with her if he is released from prison for the 1996 murder of her own husband.

Rubina Malik, 42, told New York Daily News she has decided to forgive Manzoor Qadar, 60, for executing Shuakat Parvez in a murder plot orchestrated by her father.

‘I miss my husband – very much. But I decided to forgive and forget,” she said.

Qadar was convicted in 2002 of shooting Parvez at the house he shared with Malik in Astoria, Queens, nearly 25 years ago.

Prosecutors said Qadar received $60,000 from Malik Rahmet Khan – Qadar’s brother and Malik’s father – to carry out the attack after Malik secretly married Parvez when her family entered into an arranged marriage with another man. Khurram Khan.

Rahmet Khan, an influential Pakistani businessman, also planned that Qadar would execute both his daughter and Khurram Khan after fleeing to New York City with Malik to help her reunite with Parvez.

Malik and Khurram Khan survived, while Qadar long insisted he was innocent of Parvez’s murder, instead claiming Malik’s brother Omar Malik pulled the trigger.

“I decided to forgive him because I know how hard it is to raise children without a father,” Malik told the Daily News of her murderous uncle.

“I’ve done mine and yet I need a father figure in my son’s life. It’s very, very hard to have lived your life without a husband.’

Malik, who had a son with Parvez who is now 23, wrote a letter to a judge last year asking for Qadar’s release from prison.

The 60-year-old had asked for compassionate release in May amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the letter signed by Malik and another brother, the widow said her uncle would be welcome to stay with her for as long as he needed.

New York widow Rubina Malik, 42, (seen leaving Brooklyn federal court in a file photo) has said her uncle can move Manzoor Qadar into her home when he is released from prison for the murder of her husband in 1996

New York widow Rubina Malik, 42, (seen leaving Brooklyn federal court in a file photo) has said her uncle can move Manzoor Qadar into her home when he is released from prison for the murder of her husband in 1996

“If our uncle is released, we are more than welcome to accommodate him in our New York home for as long as he needs,” she wrote.

Malik also wrote that her husband’s killer had shown “love and affection” towards her, without mentioning the 1996 murder.

The widow told the Daily News that she has also forgiven her father for arranging her husband’s murder and launching an assassination attempt on her.

She said they now have a “good relationship” and that she had visited him several times in Pakistan since the 1996 murders, most recently in 1996.

Qadar was released by federal judge Allyne Ross of Brooklyn, but he reapplied in October on health grounds, citing pre-diabetes, heart problems and hypertension, and his wife’s ill health at home in England.

Ross approved his release that time, pointing to Malik’s belief that “justice has been served.”

“It is established that Mr Qadar has committed a serious and heinous crime,” Ross wrote in her decision, seen by the Daily News.

But it is pertinent to note that Rubina, the person most affected by the murder at the heart of this case, believes justice has been served.

“She supports Mr Qadar’s release and has offered to open her own home to him, despite his responsibility for her husband’s death.”

It is not clear when Qadar will be released, but he is expected to be deported to Pakistan instead of living with his niece.

Malik told the Daily News she was never sure whether her uncle was responsible for her husband’s murder.

Qadar was convicted in 2002 of shooting Shuakat Parvez outside the home he shared with Malik in Astoria, Queens, in a murder plot orchestrated by Malik's father.  Malik (left), Parvez (center) and relatives in an undated image

Qadar was convicted in 2002 of shooting Shuakat Parvez outside the home he shared with Malik in Astoria, Queens, in a murder plot orchestrated by Malik’s father. Malik (left), Parvez (center) and relatives in an undated image

“I didn’t know who did it, who planned it, or whatever. They asked me during the trial if I felt like he? [Qadar] did it. I said I don’t know if he did it or not,” she said of the trial, where she testified.

“I still don’t know who was responsible. The state never disclosed anything to me. They said it was circumstantial evidence. I don’t know who did it or who is responsible,” Malik said.

Qadar was found guilty of contract murder and conspiracy to commit contract murder in 2002 for the November 1996 murder.”

Parvez and Malik were secretly married against her family’s wishes.

Malik was then forced to marry Khurram Khan, according to court documents.

Some time after they got married, Malik confided in him about Parvez, who now lived in the US.

Malik and Khurram Khan fled Malik’s family and moved to the US, where Malik was reunited with Parvez, the documents show.

Malik’s father and brother Omar Malik, who also lived in the US, conspired to kill Malik, Parvez and Khurram Khan, prosecutors said.

Qadar then flew from Manchester, England to New York on November 15.

A week later, on November 22, Parvez was shot and killed near his home in Queens.

Witnesses saw Parvez being chased by a white station wagon as the passenger fired at him.

Prosecutors said Qadar and Omar Malik were the only people in the car.

Omar Malik fled to Pakistan after the murder and Qadar was the only accused.

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