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The (proper) treatment of Sir Alex Ferguson during the rapid rise from Manchester United to the top of the Premier League is characteristic of this harder approach. However, it also led him to kick a soccer shoe in 2003 at David Beckham (left)

The & # 39; hairdryer treatment & # 39; that is used by coaches to insult their team's performance during team discussions actually leads to better performance, experts say.

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Coaches who pick up negative points from a game and follow the lead of Sir Alex Ferguson's famous rest periods are more likely to bring their team to victory, research suggests.

The finding goes against Hollywood & # 39; s treatment of sports coaches such as Gene Hackman in Hoosiers or Billy Bob Thornton in Friday Night Lights.

Sir Alex Ferguson's treatment of players during the stormy rise from Manchester United to the top of the Premier League is characteristic of this harder approach.

This management style is also used by Jason Brown in the popular documentary series Last Chance U.

However, it also led to & # 39; Fergie & # 39; in 2003 kicked a soccer shoe at the head of superstar David Beckham, forcing the player to leave the team and eventually costing Jason his job after telling a student & # 39; I am your new Hitler & # 39 ;.

Researchers warn that the finding is not a license for sports coaches, or leaders in any area, to take things too far.

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The (proper) treatment of Sir Alex Ferguson during the rapid rise from Manchester United to the top of the Premier League is characteristic of this harder approach. However, it also led him to kick a soccer shoe in 2003 at David Beckham (left)

The (proper) treatment of Sir Alex Ferguson during the rapid rise from Manchester United to the top of the Premier League is characteristic of this harder approach. However, it also led him to kick a soccer shoe in 2003 at David Beckham (left)

HOW DOES THE STUDY WORK?

Researchers gathered the information for their studies by contacting more than 50 coaches for basketball teams from high schools and colleges in Northern California.

They asked if they could record their half-time dressing room conversations and continued to hold speeches for 304 games played by 23 teams.

They trained coders to assess each break on the extent to which coaches expressed different emotions.

These varied from positive, such as satisfied, excited, relaxed, inspired, to negative – disgusting, angry, frustrated, scared.

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The researchers also conducted a controlled laboratory experiment in which they played selected peptalks for the participants and asked them how motivated or unmotivated they felt after hearing them.

Again, they discovered that negative speeches could have a motivating effect, but that the effects of such negativity diminished fairly quickly.

Experts from the Haas School of Business at Berkeley, Berkeley, analyzed hundreds of half-time speeches and final scores of basketball games at high and high schools.

They discovered that coaches do better if they suspend the happy conversation and knock down the hammer.

Researchers found a significant relationship between how negative a coach was during the break and how well the team played in the second half.

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The more negativity, the more the team defeated the opposition.

& # 39; Instead of saying: & # 39; You are doing great, keep it up, & # 39; it's better to say: & # 39; I don't care if you are 10 points higher, you can play better than this & # 39;, & # 39; Professor Emeritus Barry Staw, who led the investigation, said in a written statement.

& # 39; Sometimes we extract content from emotion and simply treat it as a positive or negative expression.

& # 39; But emotion often brings a message that causes people to listen and pay attention while leaders try to correct or redirect behavior.

& # 39; Our results do not license leaders to be a jerk. But if you have a very important project or merger to be completed on the weekend, negative emotions can be a very useful arrow to have in your quiver to achieve better performance. & # 39;

This management style is also used by Jason Brown (photo) of the East Mississippi Community College coach in the popular American documentary series Last Chance U
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This management style is also used by Jason Brown (photo) of the East Mississippi Community College coach in the popular American documentary series Last Chance U

This management style is also used by Jason Brown (photo) of the East Mississippi Community College coach in the popular American documentary series Last Chance U

Researchers gathered the information for their studies by contacting more than 50 coaches for basketball teams from high schools and colleges in Northern California.

They asked if they could record their half-time dressing room conversations and continued to hold speeches for 304 games played by 23 teams.

They trained coders to assess each break on the extent to which coaches expressed different emotions.

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These varied from positive, such as satisfied, excited, relaxed, inspired, to negative – disgusting, angry, frustrated, scared.

The researchers also conducted a controlled laboratory experiment in which they played selected peptalks for the participants and asked them how motivated or unmotivated they felt after hearing them.

Again, they discovered that negative speeches could have a motivating effect, but that the effects of such negativity diminished fairly quickly.

In other words, the results showed a more traditional calling curve, with motivation diminishing when coaches became too angry or too negative.

The full findings of the study were published in the Journal of Applied Psychology.

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