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Why Australia’s waters were more shark infested when a grieving teenager in the family was mutilated in NSW

REVEALED: Why Australia’s waters are more shark infested than ever – as a grieving teenager maimed in NSW

  • A marine biology expert has warned that there is an increasing risk of shark attacks
  • Professor Robert Harcourt said sharks stay on the NSW coast longer
  • His warning comes after NSW teenager Mani Hart-Deville was maimed
  • He is the fifth person to die from a shark attack in Australia this year

Australian waters are more affected by sharks than ever because warmer currents attract predators, researchers said.

Shark deaths have peaked in 10 years this year, while statistics show that attacks have doubled in the past two decades.

Marine biology expert Robert Harcourt blamed the increase in warmer waters, claiming that sharks spend longer periods at popular surf spots.

His warning comes just days after Mani Hart-Deville, 15, was torn to death by a shark on Wooli Beach, north of Coffs Harbor, just before 2:30 PM on Saturday.

After teenage Mani Hart-Deville, 15, (photo) was torn to death by a shark north of Coffs Harbor, a marine biology expert has warned that there is an increasing risk of shark attack at NSW

After teenage Mani Hart-Deville, 15, (photo) was torn to death by a shark north of Coffs Harbor, a marine biology expert has warned that there is an increasing risk of shark attack at NSW

Harcourt said the warm eastern current, drawing nutrient-rich water from the bottom of the sea, attracted prey fish and sharks.

“Big whites off the northern coast of NSW and bull sharks in Sydney stayed around for about two months, but now that is increasing to about five months,” he said. The Australian.

“With global warming on the east coast of Australia, we predict that bull sharks will spend more time south.

“We predict that they will spend much more time here in Sydney in the next decade.”

Robert Harcourt, a professor at Macquarie University, said the danger of shark attacks increased as the East Australian current warmed, attracting prey fish and sharks (Mani Hart-Deville pictured)

Robert Harcourt, a professor at Macquarie University, said the danger of shark attacks increased as the East Australian current warmed, attracting prey fish and sharks (Mani Hart-Deville pictured)

Robert Harcourt, a professor at Macquarie University, said the danger of shark attacks increased as the East Australian current warmed, attracting prey fish and sharks (Mani Hart-Deville pictured)

Friends, family and other members of the surf community watched in horror on Saturday as Mani was torn to death.

The teenager paddled to his first wave of the day when he was brutally attacked.

Other surfers, including friends, tried to scare the shark away before taking the boy to shore where he received first aid for serious leg injuries.

Unfortunately Mani could not be saved and died on the beach.

NSW Ambulance inspector Scott Acton said “no words” describe the scene paramedics face.

For the coroner, a report on the teen’s death will be prepared.

Statistics show that the number of shark attacks has doubled in the past 20 years, Mani Hart-Deville was the fifth person killed by a shark this year (Mani Hart-Deville's surfboard shown)

Statistics show that the number of shark attacks has doubled in the past 20 years, Mani Hart-Deville was the fifth person killed by a shark this year (Mani Hart-Deville's surfboard shown)

Statistics show that the number of shark attacks has doubled in the past 20 years, Mani Hart-Deville was the fifth person killed by a shark this year (Mani Hart-Deville’s surfboard shown)

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