WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

WH Covid chief warns US is ‘vulnerable’ to virus in future

A senior White House official warns the country may remain vulnerable to COVID-19 if Congress doesn’t approve more funding for tests and vaccines, just as many Americans are hopeful the pandemic will end soon and are showing they already have. It is not like this. as worried about the virus as in previous months.

Dr. Ashish Jha, who was recently named White House coronavirus response coordinator, told the Associated Press Thursday that Americans’ immunity to the virus, whether from vaccines or natural infection, is waning.

This comes as the federal government fears funding for COVID-related programs will soon run out, significantly reducing the access Americans will have to vaccines, tests and treatments. This would leave the population ‘vulnerable’ to the virus in the future, explains Jha.

These warnings come as fewer and fewer Americans worry about the virus, according to a recently released report. Gallup poll, and many are prepared to put the virus behind them and return to normal life. Less than a third of those surveyed said they were still worried about covid.

However, US case numbers are trending upward, up 90,000 a day for the first time since late February, rising 37 percent over the past week. However, deaths are cratering, indicating the milder nature of recent strains of covid, with a 30 per cent drop over the past week to 386 a day.

WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

1652456759 201 WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

“As we get into the fall, we’re all going to be much more vulnerable to a virus that has much more immune leakage than it does today and certainly six months ago,” Jha told The Associated Press. access point.

“That leaves a lot of us vulnerable.”

Dr. Ashish Jha (pictured), White House Covid response coordinator, warns Americans could soon be left vulnerable to the pandemic if more funding isn't approved

Dr. Ashish Jha (pictured), White House Covid response coordinator, warns Americans could soon be left vulnerable to the pandemic if more funding isn’t approved

Jha is pushing for lawmakers to approve more funding for the federal government to devote to Covid mitigation measures, an issue that has become contentious in recent weeks as some want to spend the money elsewhere.

Biden had pushed for the funds to be part of a spending package that included aid to Ukraine, but was forced to withdraw it out of fear that disagreement from that section would stall the entire bill.

Federal officials say the funding will be enough to bring the United States down, while allowing the country to continue ordering Covid vaccines. There has been speculation that if the funding is not approved, the US will no longer be able to offer the vaccines to all Americans. only to high-risk groups.

Jha fears that every moment funding is delayed will push the US down the pecking order of vaccine orders, as other countries order more vaccines in the future, and they will take precedence as leading firms like Pfizer and Moderna make more injections.

1652456761 294 WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

1652456762 436 WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

“I would say we really are on that deadline and waiting much longer just puts us further back in line,” Jha added.

‘If we are willing to be at the back of the line and get our shots in the spring, we have plenty of time. But then we will have missed the whole fall and winter. That is not an acceptable outcome, I think, for the American people.’

However, whether Americans want more Covid vaccines is still up for debate. Rollout of COVID-19 boosters was slow when they first became available in the fall of 2021, with America oldest do not go en masse to receive vaccinations in a way that the federal government expected.

Little change was seen in the daily vaccines given when the fourth dose of the shot was approved for Americans 50 and older earlier this year.

1652456763 361 WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

A Gallup poll released Wednesday found that only 31 percent of Americans report being “somewhat concerned” or “very concerned” about contracting COVID-19, a drop of three percent from the version of the poll that was released. made in February. Within that group, 17 percent of Americans said they were still “very worried” about Covid, a drop of 5 percent.

The survey points to the changing state of the virus as the United States heads into the summer months. In previous years, the warm weather months have come with large and devastating virus surges.

The survey was conducted in mid-April, when the trend of declining cases that had existed for almost three months up to that point after the mid-January peak of Omicron’s winter surge began to reverse.

Participants were asked about their feelings about the pandemic, the virus, and what kinds of personal mitigation strategies they were using, or ignoring, in their everyday lives.

1652456764 975 WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

1652456765 387 WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

The study also found that 64 percent of Americans believed the pandemic was “getting better.” At the time of the survey, cases had just fallen below 30,000 a day, making it one of the lowest points since the start of the pandemic in March 2020.

About 21 percent of Americans said they believed the situation was about the same, and only 12 percent believed it was getting worse.

The last time this small number of Americans believed the situation was getting worse was in the summer of 2021, when cases were at a low point just before the explosion of the Delta variant.

These good feelings have also led to some changes in behavior. Only 17 percent of Americans reported that they were still social distancing, the lowest point in the pandemic so far.

Just under a third of Americans said they had avoided large crowds, a fifth reported avoiding public places and only 15 percent avoided small gatherings.

Those numbers are also pandemic lows, Gallup reports.

The changing sentiments about Covid are a positive sign for the future, but they also come as officials warn that more pandemic-related threats are forming around the world.

The prevalence of the new BA 2.12.1 Covid strain, the most infectious version of the virus sequenced by US health officials, continues to grow, officials report.

1652456766 977 WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

1652456768 299 WH Covid chief warns US is vulnerable to virus in

The strain, which was first detected in New York last month, now accounts for 42.6 percent of sequenced COVID cases in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported Tuesday. . That’s a 33 percent increase from the cases the strain made up the previous week.

This newly detected version of the virus is a sublineage of the “stealth” variant BA.2, which remains the dominant strain, accounting for 56 percent of cases. The new strain is believed to have a growth advantage of around 27 percent over its predecessor, and is likely to become the country’s dominant strain by the end of the month.

Every Covid case sequenced by the CDC falls under the umbrella of the Omicron variant, and the Delta variant has now been completely eliminated by its successor.

The BA.1 strain of the virus, which caused record outbreaks of cases around the world during the winter, now accounts for only 0.6 percent of cases in the US, as its subvariant has nearly outpaced it. complete.

While the BA 2.12.1 strain has been slow to replace the stealth variant as the dominant strain across the country, it already accounts for two out of three cases in the New York and New Jersey region of the US, the researchers report. CDC.

It is the only region of the country where the strain is dominant. It is also the part of the country where officials first detected this new strain in the US.

The new strain accounts for nearly half of the cases, 48 ​​percent, in the Mid-Atlantic region of Virginia, Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania, according to the CDC.

It also makes up more than 40 percent of cases in New England and the Deep South regions of America.

Like previous strains, this version of the virus appears to be making its way across the country from east to west, with prevalence decreasing in more western regions of the country.

The BA 2.12.1 strain (red) now accounts for 43% of sequenced COVID-19 cases in the US, up from 33% the previous week.  the variant

The BA 2.12.1 strain (red) now accounts for 43% of sequenced COVID-19 cases in the US, up from 33% the previous week. The “stealth” variant BA.2 (pink) remains dominant, accounting for 56% of cases

BA 2.12.1 (red) accounts for two out of three cases in the New York and New Jersey region, the CDC reports.  In all other regions, the 'stealth' (pink) variant remains dominant

BA 2.12.1 (red) accounts for two out of three cases in the New York and New Jersey region, the CDC reports. In all other regions, the ‘stealth’ (pink) variant remains dominant

Newer versions of Omicron may also be on their way to America.

There is growing concern about the BA.4 and BA.5 strains of the virus, which are now gaining ground in South Africa, causing another surge in the nation. The country was also the first to suffer from the original version of Omicron in late November.

Last month, the World Health Organization announced that it is officially tracking the two strains of the virus as potential concerns.

AN prepress studio from South Africa also found that the two variants may have the ability to evade immunity to the virus provided by a previous infection.

That could be a big concern for officials, since the mass spread of Omicron during the winter months, giving a large portion of Americans immunity to the virus in the process, will no longer protect people going forward, That opens the door to another big increase. .

These new threats have the White House worried that the United States could have a dark fall and winter months in the second half of 2022.

A senior Biden administration official told CNN that the White House is currently projecting about 100 million infections of the virus will occur during the coming fall and winter months, a time of year when new records have been set. of cases during both years. pandemic.

For comparison, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, about 40 million Covid cases were reported in the United States between September 1 and February 28. the White House believes case numbers could reach even higher levels this year compared to last

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More