Werkman who drove the Suez Canal excavator says he owes overtime

0

My boss has to dig deep! Werkman who drove the Suez Canal excavator says he owes overtime after getting three hours of sleep to free the freighter

  • The Suez Canal excavator man said he shouldn’t be working overtime yet
  • Abdullah Abdul-Gawad described grueling 21-hour days on the mission
  • He and his colleagues got only three hours of sleep at night

The worker who drove the Suez Canal excavator has said he owes overtime after just three hours of sleep.

Excavator operator Abdullah Abdul-Gawad has shared how he and his colleagues worked 21-hour days after the Ever Given, a skyscraper-sized container ship, became trapped in the canal on March 23.

According to Abdul-Gawad, he and his colleagues would sleep no more than three hours at night.

Excavator operator Abdullah Abdul-Gawad (pictured) has shared how he and his colleagues worked 21 hours a day after the Ever Given, a skyscraper-sized container ship, became trapped in the canal on March 23.

Excavator operator Abdullah Abdul-Gawad (pictured) has shared how he and his colleagues worked 21 hours a day after the Ever Given, a skyscraper-sized container ship, became trapped in the canal on March 23.

One night he only slept for an hour. Still, he claims he has not yet received financial compensation for overtime.

Speak against Business insider, he said he feared the docked ship could destabilize and collapse on the workers at any moment.

“The thing is, I was terrified that the ship would swing too far to one side or the other,” he said.

“Because if it fell on its side on me, it’s goodbye me and goodbye a digger.”

He added that compared to the size of the excavator, the size of the ship was “ absolutely terrifying. ”

A backhoe attempting to dig out the keel of the Ever Given, a Panamanian-flagged freighter, wedged across the Suez Canal on March 25, blocking traffic on the vital waterway

A backhoe attempting to dig out the keel of the Ever Given, a Panamanian-flagged freighter, wedged across the Suez Canal on March 25, blocking traffic on the vital waterway

A backhoe attempting to dig out the keel of the Ever Given, a Panamanian-flagged freighter, wedged across the Suez Canal on March 25, blocking traffic on the vital waterway

The ship was finally driven out on March 29 after a specialized dredger, the Mashhour, was deployed.

Abdul-Gawad helped move rock and sand material from the bow of the ship, while the Mashhour expelled the sludge from the canal bottom.

The excavator man said he and his men were left “ half-dead from exhaustion ” at the end of the mission, although he added that he was immensely proud of what had been achieved in those days.

‘At first it is an achievement for Egypt, but also for me.

This might happen once in your life or, you know, maybe twice. It’s something to be proud of, ”he told the publication.

Advertisement