Wealthy white parents worry about sending children to selective schools for fear that they will be in a minority

Wealthy white parents turn away from selective schools because they fear that their children will be an ethnic minority

  • Wealthy white parents avoid selective schools of fear children will be an ethnic minority
  • Migrant families do not send their children to private schools because of the same fear
  • White and non-white families in the & # 39; self-managed & # 39; from Sydney when choosing schools
  • The ethnic composition of the school does not reflect the diversity of the suburbs in which they are located
  • The researcher involved can cause intercultural conceptual problems

Wealthy white parents avoid sending their children to selective schools because they fear they will be an ethnic minority, an expert said.

Christina Ho, a social scientist at the University of Technology, says Anglo families choose to send their children to private schools while migrant families choose selective schools.

& # 39; We do have this self-segregation, & # 39; said Dr. Ho.

And part of the reason seems to be based on the fear of being a minority.

New research shows that well-off white families in Sydney avoid sending their children to selective schools, out of concern that they are in an ethnic minority group, and prefer private schools like The King's School in Parramatta instead.

New research shows that well-off white families in Sydney avoid sending their children to selective schools, out of concern that they are in an ethnic minority group, and prefer private schools like The King's School in Parramatta instead.

& # 39; Many Anglo families say: & # 39; I would be a minority if I went to a selective school & # 39 ;, said Dr. Ho.

The same concern influences the educational choices of rich migrant families, who previously preferred private schools.

As with the Anglo families, they now opted for selective schools because they were concerned about a striking minority in private schools.

& # 39; We have a lot of rich migrants in this country living in the eastern suburbs and the north coast, who may be able to afford to send their children to private schools, but they are not. & # 39; said Dr. Ho.

In NSW, more than 80 percent of the students in fully selective schools came from language backgrounds other than English (LBOTE).

Of the 99 schools with less than 10 percent LBOTE students, more than half were private and in affluent areas.

The King & # 39; s School (photo) in Parramatta in Sydney still has a majority Anglo student composition, but this is changing. For migrant student numbers from 31 percent in 2015, this has risen to more than 40 percent

The King & # 39; s School (photo) in Parramatta in Sydney still has a majority Anglo student composition, but this is changing. For migrant student numbers from 31 percent in 2015, this has risen to more than 40 percent

The King & # 39; s School (photo) in Parramatta in Sydney still has a majority Anglo student composition, but this is changing. For migrant student numbers from 31 percent in 2015, this has risen to more than 40 percent

Dr. Ho & # 39; s research indicates that the process of self-segregation is leading a bigger problem in Sydney, where many schools are more ethnically divided than the suburbs in which they are located.

& # 39; The increasing diversity of our communities is not reflected in our education system & # 39 ;, said Dr. Ho msn.com.

The process of self-segregation frightens Dr. Ho that schools no longer reflect their local community, but that students have fewer opportunities to develop cultural understanding.

She adds that the reason for the ethnic divide lies in policies that encourage parents to look for schools, about selecting their local school.

Former King & # 39; s School (photo) student, Pranay Jha, the son of Indian migrants, said he felt isolated during his time at the school because he belonged to an ethnic minority

Former King & # 39; s School (photo) student, Pranay Jha, the son of Indian migrants, said he felt isolated during his time at the school because he belonged to an ethnic minority

Former King & # 39; s School (photo) student, Pranay Jha, the son of Indian migrants, said he felt isolated during his time at the school because he belonged to an ethnic minority

Pranay Jha, the son of Indian migrants, had the choice of attending a selective school or visiting the royal school in North Parramatta with a scholarship.

His parents decided to go to the private school option, and Mr. Jha admits that he felt isolated and suffered some cultural disgrace.

& # 39; I was surrounded by white people, and to be socially successful at the school you had to undermine your ethnicity a little bit, & he said.

Mr Jha also recalls that he was racially abused while exercising and believes that if there was more diversity at the school, it would offer students with a migrant background a greater sense of solidarity.

However, the ethnic composition of The King & # 39; s School has changed since Mr. Jha's graduation in 2015. At that time, 31 percent of the students were LBOTE.

By 2018, the number had risen to more than 40 percent.

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