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Waze misdirected people trying to reach Atlantic City to a wildlife reserve in New Jersey

The Waze navigation app mistakenly directed people trying to reach Atlantic City to a wildlife reserve in New Jersey 60 miles away after an advertisement for the Borgota Hotel and Casino appeared to be connected to the wrong GPS location

  • The Google traffic-focused GPS application tricked drivers trying to reach Atlantic City
  • When searching for the Hotel Borgata, an ad appeared with the correct address
  • However, the ad was linked to an incorrect GPS pin 60 miles northwest
  • The problems seem to have affected several hundred travelers.

Last week, travelers looking to avoid traffic on their way to Atlantic City found themselves abandoned in a nature reserve 60 miles off the course thanks to a problem with Waze.

The problem seemed to be specific to those people trying to reach the Borgata Hotel and Casino.

When users searched Borgata in the GPS traffic optimization application, an ad appeared with the correct address, but for some reason still unknown, it was linked to an incorrect GPS pin in the Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area.

Several hundred travelers trying to get to Atlantic City using Google's Waze application for instructions were found instead directed to the Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area (pictured above) more than 60 miles away.

Several hundred travelers trying to get to Atlantic City using Google’s Waze application for instructions were found instead directed to the Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area (pictured above) more than 60 miles away.

The problem seemed to affect several hundred people, who found themselves bouncing along the sandy and unpaved roads of the nature reserve an hour’s drive northwest of Atlantic City.

“My department towed 10 cars in 5 days that were stuck,” said Lt. Christopher Parise of the Jackson Police Department CNN.

“A response from Waze to the error report indicated that another 249 reported the same location error in recent days, so hundreds have been fooled there.”

Jackson’s police made an announcement warning people about the confusion in a Facebook post, which attracted more than a hundred comments from locals who had already noticed the increase in lost travelers.

“I was wondering how this lovely couple ended up in the lake when I was hunting there last week,” one user wrote.

“They pointed me out and begged me to show them the way out.”

Another joked: ‘[W]Who the hell is going on unpaved roads thinking it will take them to a casino? “

Local police say the problem probably arose because an advertisement for the Borgata Hotel and Casino (pictured above) in Atlantic City was associated with an incorrect GPS pin in Waze, despite the announcement showing the correct address.

Local police say the problem probably arose because an advertisement for the Borgata Hotel and Casino (pictured above) in Atlantic City was associated with an incorrect GPS pin in Waze, despite the announcement showing the correct address.

Local police say the problem probably arose because an advertisement for the Borgata Hotel and Casino (pictured above) in Atlantic City was associated with an incorrect GPS pin in Waze, despite the announcement showing the correct address.

A Waze spokesman said the problem has been fixed, but no explanation was given on how the Borgata was anchored to an incorrect GPS location, even when the hotel icon had the correct address.

Police advised using extra caution when relying on locations in the application that are marked with an orange ad logo.

It is not the first time that Waze leads drivers astray. In 2018, the application directed a driver from a boat ramp to the frozen surface of Lake Champlain, which caused his car to fall through the ice.

HOW DOES GPS WORK?

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a network of approximately 30 satellites that orbit the Earth at an altitude of 20,000 km (12,000 miles).

The system can determine its location anywhere on Earth.

The system was originally developed by the US government. UU. For military navigation, but now anyone with a GPS device, be it a SatNav, a mobile phone or a portable GPS unit, can receive the radio signals transmitted by the satellites.

Wherever you are on the planet, at least four GPS satellites are “visible” at any time.

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a network of approximately 30 satellites that orbit the Earth at an altitude of 20,000 km (12,000 miles)

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a network of approximately 30 satellites that orbit the Earth at an altitude of 20,000 km (12,000 miles)

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a network of approximately 30 satellites that orbit the Earth at an altitude of 20,000 km (12,000 miles)

Each transmits information about their position and the current time at regular intervals.

These signals, which travel at the speed of light, are intercepted by your GPS receiver, which calculates how far each satellite is based on the time it took for the messages to arrive.

Once you have information on how far at least three satellites are, your GPS receiver can determine its location through a process called trilateration.

Trilateration It is a sophisticated version of triangulation, although it does not use the measurement of angles in its calculations.

Data from a single satellite provide a general location of a point within a large circular area on the Earth’s surface.

GPS satellites have atomic clocks on board to keep the exact time. However, general and special relativity predicts that differences will appear between these clocks and an identical clock on Earth.

General Relativity predicts that time will seem to run slower under a stronger gravitational force; therefore, clocks on board satellites will appear to run faster than a clock on Earth.

Credit: Physics.org

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