Water restrictions will be imposed in Sydney for the first time in a decade as the number of dams decreases

Water restrictions will be imposed in Sydney for the first time in a decade if drafts fall due to drought

  • Level one water restrictions limit the use of sprinklers, sprays and fixed hoses
  • Restrictions will be introduced as soon as the city dams fall less than 50%
  • The state government is expected to make the announcement on Tuesday
  • Water restrictions were maintained in Sydney from October 2003 to June 2009
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Water restrictions will be enforced in Sydney for the first time in a decade as a result of dropping dam levels.

The New South Wales government is expected to announce level 1 water restrictions on Tuesday, limiting the use of sprinklers, sprays and fixed hoses as soon as the city's dams drop to less than 50%.

According to the drought indicator of the state government, 98 percent of NSW is affected by drought with 14 percent in severe drought.

The tight water restrictions were previously maintained in Sydney from October 2003 to June 2009, after the dam levels dropped to less than half full.

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The state government is expected to announce level 1 water level restrictions for Sydney later today, limiting the use of sprinklers, sprays and fixed hoses as soon as the city's dam falls below 50% (stock photo)

The state government is expected to announce level 1 water level restrictions for Sydney later today, limiting the use of sprinklers, sprays and fixed hoses as soon as the city's dam falls below 50% (stock photo)

According to the drought indicator of the state government, 98 percent of NSW is affected by drought with 14 percent in severe drought. Tight water restrictions were previously maintained in Sydney from October 2003 to June 2009 after evaporation dropped below 50 percent

According to the drought indicator of the state government, 98 percent of NSW is affected by drought with 14 percent in severe drought. Tight water restrictions were previously maintained in Sydney from October 2003 to June 2009 after evaporation dropped below 50 percent

According to the drought indicator of the state government, 98 percent of NSW is affected by drought with 14 percent in severe drought. Tight water restrictions were previously maintained in Sydney from October 2003 to June 2009 after evaporation dropped below 50 percent

Water NSW data statistics Dams have fallen a quarter of their volume last year and are currently at 53.5 percent.

Water restrictions can become even stricter if the dam levels still drastically decrease.

The government attempted to raise Sydney's water levels this year by turning on the city's desalination plant in Kurnell in January.

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Warragamba Dam, located in the central west of the NSW, supplies water to more than 3.7 million people living in Sydney and the lower Blue Mountains, but the reserves are barely more than 55% of capacity.

Water NSW data statistics Dams have fallen a quarter of their volume last year and are currently at 53.5 percent. Water restrictions can become even stricter if drafts are still falling drastically (stock photo)

Water NSW data statistics Dams have fallen a quarter of their volume last year and are currently at 53.5 percent. Water restrictions can become even stricter if drafts are still falling drastically (stock photo)

Water NSW data statistics Dams have fallen a quarter of their volume last year and are currently at 53.5 percent. Water restrictions can become even stricter if drafts are still falling drastically (stock photo)

Warragamba Dam (photo) supplies water to more than 3.7 million people who live in Sydney and the lower Blue Mountains, but the reserves are barely above 55 percent capacity. Burrendong and Keepit Dam, located in the central west of NSW, are at six percent and one percent water capacity respectively

Warragamba Dam (photo) supplies water to more than 3.7 million people who live in Sydney and the lower Blue Mountains, but the reserves are barely above 55 percent capacity. Burrendong and Keepit Dam, located in the central west of NSW, are at six percent and one percent water capacity respectively

Warragamba Dam (photo) supplies water to more than 3.7 million people who live in Sydney and the lower Blue Mountains, but the reserves are barely above 55 percent capacity. Burrendong and Keepit Dam, located in the central west of NSW, are at six percent and one percent water capacity respectively

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Burrendong and Keepit Dam, located in the central west of NSW, are at six percent and one percent water capacity respectively.

The April and May this year in Sydney is on track to become the second driest period in 160 years, according to the Bureau of Meteorology.

Warm weather has also exacerbated the dry conditions, with autumn temperatures set at 1.5 ° C above the long-term average.

Sydney recorded its hottest day so late in the fall season in 25 years, with a reading of 27C on May 21.

The levels of water restrictions

As NSW and other parts of the country go deeper into the drought, water restrictions are ready to be introduced to help homeowners and farmers cope with the drying time.

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Level 1: Sprinklers, sprays and fixed hoses can only be used between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Hand-held snakes are only permitted between 4 p.m. and 9 a.m.

Only a high pressure cleaner can be used to rinse off a hard surface or vehicle.

Level 2: Sprinklers, sprays and microject sprays are prohibited.

Hand-operated hoses with a trigger nozzle can only be used to wash cars between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

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Hand-operated hoses and sub-surface dripper systems can only be used between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Level 3: All nozzles are prohibited.

Hand-operated hoses can only be used for 15 minutes between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Hard surfaces cannot be washed away.

Level 4: Residential use of treated, city and river water outdoors is not permitted.

The Council will cut irrigation to public parks, gardens and other public facilities.

Irrigation is not possible outside industrial and commercial green spaces.

Buckets of water should be used to clean car windows, windscreens, and license plates, but only for safety and regulatory purposes.

Level 5: All level 4 prohibitions have been implemented.

Evaporative air conditioners can only be used moderately.

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Source: Tamworth Regional Council

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