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Watch an AI-powered tank shoot rounds and blow up targets in the first live fire of the ‘Type-X’

Imagine a world where wars are fought by AI-powered tanks, allowing soldiers to keep a safe distance from the battlefield and still destroy their enemies.

While this sounds like something out of a science fiction movie, the screenplay is exactly what Milrem Robotics and Kongsberg Defense & Aerospace demonstrated in a first live fire from the Type-X Robotic Combat Vehicle (RCV) PROTECTOR Remote Turret.

Dubbed Type-X, the unmanned tank features AI-powered navigation and obstacle-detection systems and a range of weapons, including 50mm cannons, anti-tank missiles, and even a tethered drone.

Milrem plans to sell its killer robot tank to Scandinavian and Western European countries, but the US has also expressed interest in the technology.

And at least 10 countries have already placed orders for the Type-X platform, including seven NATO members.

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Dubbed Type-X, the unmanned tank features AI-powered navigation and obstacle-detection systems and a range of weapons, including 50mm cannons, anti-tank missiles and even a tethered drone

Dubbed Type-X, the unmanned tank features AI-powered navigation and obstacle-detection systems and a range of weapons, including 50mm cannons, anti-tank missiles and even a tethered drone

Milrem shared a video of the robot tank in action, which shows him driving through an open field, aiming at cars and shooting at the target – blasting the vehicle to pieces.

Gert Hankewitz, director of market and export control at Milrem, said: National Defense earlier this week: ‘You want to send them to take the most dangerous positions because there are [are] no men in it.

“If it blows up, everyone in the manned vehicles behind it will stay safe.”

The tank-like chassis is a unique Milrem design that allowed the company to make the vehicle lighter and lower – making the tank harder to see on the battlefield.

Milrem shared a video of the robot tank in action, showing it traveling through an open field, aiming at cars and firing at the target - blasting the vehicle to pieces

Milrem shared a video of the robot tank in action, showing it traveling through an open field, aiming at cars and firing at the target – blasting the vehicle to pieces

The AI ​​can control the tanks' navigation and movement, pick targets and get ready to fire, but the system is only semi-autonomous - meaning a human has to pull the trigger to fire the cannon

The AI ​​can control the tanks’ navigation and movement, pick targets and get ready to fire, but the system is only semi-autonomous – meaning a human has to pull the trigger to fire the cannon

Hankewitz notes that the AI ​​can control the tanks’ navigation and movement, pick targets and prepare to fire, but the system is only semi-autonomous – meaning a human must pull the trigger to fire the cannon. fire.

The US military is building its own fleet of war robots, which appear to be inspired by the James Cameron film Terminator.

The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is working on a series of “biohybrid robotics” that integrate living organisms into mechanical systems that “bring forth unprecedented agility and versatility.”

The team envisions growing muscle tissue in a lab that would be added to robotic joints instead of traditional actuators — components responsible for moving and controlling mechanisms.

Milrem plans to sell its killer robot tank to Scandinavian and Western European countries, but the US has also expressed interest in the technology.  And at least 10 countries have already placed orders for the Type-X platform, including seven NATO members

Milrem plans to sell its killer robot tank to Scandinavian and Western European countries, but the US has also expressed interest in the technology. And at least 10 countries have already placed orders for the Type-X platform, including seven NATO members

The project aims to give robots the same agility and precision that muscles provide to biological systems, allowing these futuristic machines to venture into spaces too risky for human soldiers.

China is already deploying robots on the battlefield. Last December, the country deployed machine-gun-carrying robots to western desert regions amid a standoff with India as troops grapple with high-altitude conditions

While using machines instead of soldiers reduces the risk of men and women during war, many experts fear that such technologies do more harm than good.

China is already deploying robots on the battlefield.  Last December, the country deployed machine-gun-carrying robots to western desert regions amid a standoff with India as troops grapple with high-altitude conditions

China is already deploying robots on the battlefield. Last December, the country deployed machine-gun-carrying robots to western desert regions amid a standoff with India as troops grapple with high-altitude conditions

Dozens of unmanned vehicles capable of carrying both weapons and supplies have been sent to Tibet, Indian media reported, the majority of which have been deployed in border regions where Chinese troops are locked in a standoff with Indian soldiers.

Vehicles include the Sharp Claw, which is mounted with a light machine gun and can be operated wirelessly, and the Mule-200, which is designed as an unmanned supply vehicle but can also be equipped with weapons.

Stuart Russell, professor of computer science at the University of California, Berkeley: said in a pronunciation: ‘We are not talking about drones, where a human pilot controls the drone.

“We are talking about autonomous weapons, which means that there is no one behind them.

“Exactly, weapons that can locate and attack targets without human intervention.”

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