Washington DC police and protesters prepare for white nationalists on the first anniversary

In this file photo of February 4, 2012, the United States police are seen working in riot gear in Washington. Government and police officials in the nation's capital say they are confident that the city can organize the white nationalist demonstration planned this weekend without violence.

Washington DC police and protesters prepare for white nationalists at the one-year demonstration of the deadly march of Unite the Right in Charlottesville

  • Unite the Right 2 will be held on Sunday afternoon in front of the White House
  • It is on the first anniversary of the first demonstration in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a countermanifestor died
  • Local activist communities in Washington DC are preparing for opposing protests
  • Jason Kessler, who organized the Charlottesville rally, predicted 400 people in his request for permission for this year's rally
  • The police have promised a massive security mobilization to keep protesters and protesters against

Associated Press

Government and police officials in the nation's capital say they are confident that the city can manage the planned white nationalist demonstration this weekend without violence.

Meanwhile, Washington's robust local activist community is also preparing for counter-protests.

The Unite the Right 2 rally will take place on Sunday afternoon at Lafayette Park in front of the White House.

The rally is scheduled for the first anniversary of the first right-wing union in Charlottesville, Virginia, which turned into chaos and violence that resulted in the death of a counter-demonstrator.

In this file photo of February 4, 2012, the United States police are seen working in riot gear in Washington. Government and police officials in the nation's capital say they are confident that the city can organize the white nationalist demonstration planned this weekend without violence.

In this file photo of February 4, 2012, the United States police are seen working in riot gear in Washington. Government and police officials in the nation's capital say they are confident that the city can organize the white nationalist demonstration planned this weekend without violence.

Estimates vary on how many white nationalist protesters will be presented. Jason Kessler, who also organized the Charlottesville rally, predicted 400 in his permit application, but participation could be much less.

The white nationalist movement has been partially divided last year, and some blame Kessler for the bad press generated by Charlottesville.

Several white nationalist leaders have disavowed the demonstration on Sunday and have asked their followers not to attend.

Rally participants are likely to be outnumbered by passionate counter-demonstrators. At least two anti-white nationalist rallies will also take place at Lafayette Park.

The local chapter of Black Lives Matter is also planning a separate march to the site.

With the Charlottesville police widely criticized for their handling of the demonstration last year, the authorities of D.C. They have committed to avoid violence.

Mayor Muriel Bowser and Police Chief Peter Newsham have pledged a massive security mobilization to keep protesters and opponents apart.

"We have a series of techniques to keep them separated," Newsham said. "We are used to the protests in Washington and the rules are quite simple: do not hurt anyone and do not break anything."

While the White House will be the backdrop for the rallies, President Donald Trump will not be in the city.

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