Was this the first high five in history? Iconic gesture made in 1977 by the first openly gay player

Was this the first high five in history? How an iconic gesture made in 1977 by the first openly gay LGB player in MLB became a symbol of pride

  • Dusty Baker and Glenn Burke performed high in 1977 while playing for the LA Dodgers
  • It was an iconic moment and would become a signature of the team's players
  • It is recognized as the first high five in history or on the other hand what made it famous
  • Burke – the first openly gay player – turned the gesture into a symbol of gay rights

After the National High Five day on Thursday, the origin of the gesture can be traced back to a baseball game in Los Angeles Dodgers from 1977 in Los Angeles.

Dodger's outfielder Dusty Baker came in for a home run and hit the hand with his teammate Glenn Burke in what is generally considered the first high five in history.

But it wasn't just an iconic high five, it had to become a symbol of gay rights in San Francisco, because Burke was the first openly gay LGB player in MLB's history.

Baker had just hit his 30th homer of the season against the Houston Astros – making the Dodgers the first team with four batters each hit 30 times in the history of the Major League.

When Glenn Burke (left) raised his hand, Dusty Baker & # 39; didn't know what to do, so he hit & # 39;

When Glenn Burke (left) raised his hand, Dusty Baker & # 39; didn't know what to do, so he hit & # 39;

Dodgers historian Mark Langill told ESPN documentary The High Five: & The way the legend goes … Glenn raised his arm high in the air, and Dusty didn't know what to do, so he hit it. & # 39;

Although hitting hands is impossible to date, the high gesture of the couple was iconic and hidden in people's imagination.

Dodgers fan Lyle Spencer told ESPN: & # 39; It was such a & moment. It was the energy of it, and it was precisely this explosion of emotion. & # 39;

The Dodgers quickly took the high five as their signature and continued to do so to the delight of their audience, Business Insider reported.

A poster from the LA Dodgers 1980 season says: & # 39; It is usually followed by a homerun, good defensive game or Dodger victory & # 39;

Burke – who was openly gay – was traded from the Dodgers to Oakland Athletics in 1978, despite his talents, and he claimed it was due to his sexuality.

The decision caused anger among his teammates, including Davey Lopes who said the next day: & # 39; He was the life of the team, on the buses, in the clubhouse, everywhere. & # 39;

His career faltered in Oakland and a knee injury sent him to the minor leagues and he professionally stopped aging 27 in 1980.

& # 39; Prejudices have brought me out of baseball sooner than I should have done & # 39 ;, Burke told the New York Times in 1992, & # 39; but I didn't change. & # 39;

A poster from the LA Dodgers 1980 season says: & # 39; It is usually followed by a homerun, good defensive game or Dodger victory & # 39;

A poster from the LA Dodgers 1980 season says: & # 39; It is usually followed by a homerun, good defensive game or Dodger victory & # 39;

A poster from the LA Dodgers 1980 season says: & # 39; It is usually followed by a homerun, good defensive game or Dodger victory & # 39;

But this turned the high five into a symbol for the gay community in the Castro area of ​​San Francisco.

In 1982 Inside Sports Magazine wrote that despite Burke's tainted career, a legacy of two male hands had continued to be held high above their heads & # 39 ;.

Burke died of an AID-related illness in 1995 when he was 42 and was the first MLB star ever to come to his teammates and the first to publicly reveal his homosexuality.

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