Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Warning for employees not to forgo their tax returns

Warning for employees not to mitigate their tax returns – since a man is jailed for devious $ 13,000 payback scam for FIVE YEARS

  • Australians issued a strict warning about the risk of fudding their tax returns
  • Joseph Kanowski, from Queensland, was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment
  • He used stolen identities to get fraudulent tax refunds worth over $ 13,000

Australians have received strict warnings about the risk of falsifying their tax returns if a man is imprisoned for fraud.

Joseph Kanowski, from Queensland, was sentenced to five years behind bars for his $ 13,000 tax return scam.

He used stolen identities to get fraudulent tax refunds and social security payments by taking over their myGov accounts and changing payment destination details to his own.

Kanowski was instructed to repay both the money and his stint behind bars as the ATO cracked down on fraudsters this tax season.

Joseph Kanowski, from Queensland, was sentenced to five years behind bars for his $ 13,000 fraud (picture on picture)

Joseph Kanowski, from Queensland, was sentenced to five years behind bars for his $ 13,000 fraud (picture on picture)

He also made false Centrelink claims and even impersonated other customers to have their payments forwarded to his account.

“We always do everything we can to help people comply with this, but as this case emphasizes, those who deliberately try to cheat the system will be held accountable,” said the ATO.

Anyone caught breaking the law can receive huge fines or imprisonment.

The ATO revealed that it has uncovered information on a number of unreliable tactics, including people who are super withdrawing and re-depositing to receive a tax deduction.

Others weaken their personal finances to sign up for the hardship program.

The ATO also closely monitors employers who manipulate their sales to receive JobKeeper wage subsidies, along with companies that play tricks to maximize cash flow injections.

Australians have been given a strict warning about the risk of cheating their tax returns as a man is locked up for committing tax evasion (picture in picture)

Australians have been given a strict warning about the risk of cheating their tax returns as a man is locked up for committing tax evasion (picture in picture)

Australians have been given a strict warning about the risk of cheating their tax returns as a man is locked up for committing tax evasion (picture in picture)

Deputy Commissioner Will Day said that the ATO generally assumed the assumption that people act fairly but would carry out checks later.

“If you have received benefits as part of the COVID-19 incentives and we discover that you are not eligible, you can hear from us,” he said.

“It is much better to come forward to make a voluntary disclosure than to wait for an audit.”

Tax returns are due no later than Saturday, October 31.

It comes after the Australian tax authorities send hair-raising text messages warning millions of people that it would check all data submitted in your next tax return.

In texts sent on June 23, the ATO reminded people that they could check all information submitted with external sources, including your employer and bank.

In addition, the watchdog said he would pre-fill tax returns with information from various sources to make completing the application easier.

“Tax time is starting soon. We make it easier by pre-filling your tax return with information from employers, banks, health funds and government agencies, “he said.

“We’ll send a message to your myGov inbox when your pre-filled information is ready.

“If you return yourself, you have until October 31 to stay the night.”

Clearly, for more than a decade, the ATO has automatically audited information submitted to other authorities in tax returns.

The Australian tax authorities have sent chilling text messages to warn people that they will check the data submitted on tax returns with a long list of external sources

The Australian tax authorities have sent chilling text messages to warn people that they will check the data submitted on tax returns with a long list of external sources

The Australian tax authorities have sent chilling text messages to warn people that they will check the data submitted on tax returns with a long list of external sources

Advertisement

.