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Warning as seaweed washed ashore in FL contains flesh-eating bacteria

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Massive amounts of seaweed washed up on shore in Florida contain FLESH-EATING bacteria that can cause ‘leaky gut syndrome’

Massive amounts of seaweed are washing up along South Florida beaches, which could carry flesh-eating pathogens. Known as sargassum, once the seaweed washes up on shore, it is a nuisance as the thick brown seaweed coats beaches, releasing a pungent odor as it breaks down and entangles humans and animals alike. penetrate. For hotels and resorts, cleaning beaches can amount to a 24-hour operation.

But algae also interact with plastic debris and Vibrio bacteria in the ocean, creating what scientists call a

But algae also interact with plastic debris and Vibrio bacteria in the ocean, creating what scientists call a “pathogenic storm” that can pose risks to swimmers. The biggest Vibrio bacterial threat is a condition called “leaky gut syndrome.” A recent study conducted by Florida Atlantic University found that Sargassum that ends up on beaches tends to harbor high levels of Vibrio bacteria. Vibriosis infection can cause a range of symptoms including diarrhea, stomach cramps, vomiting, fever, chills, ear infections and wound infections.

Pathogens have a unique ability to adhere to microplastics in warm ocean water.  Researchers have found that the Vibrio bacterium has specific genes, known as 'zot' genes, which produce toxins that can damage the intestines, leading to a condition similar to 'leaky gut syndrome', where the bacterium can enter the intestine, get stuck in the intestines, and cause infection.  If a fish consumes a piece of plastic contaminated with Vibrio bacteria, it can develop a leaky gut and release waste nutrients that stimulate the growth of Sargassum and other organisms in the surrounding environment.  There have already been cases of Vibrio-related deaths linked to foodborne illnesses, such as after consuming raw oysters, reports NBC Miami.

Pathogens have a unique ability to adhere to microplastics in warm ocean water. Researchers have found that the Vibrio bacterium has specific genes, known as ‘zot’ genes, which produce toxins that can damage the intestines, leading to a condition similar to ‘leaky gut syndrome’, where the bacterium can enter the intestine, get stuck in the intestines, and cause infection. If a fish consumes a piece of plastic contaminated with Vibrio bacteria, it can develop a leaky gut and release waste nutrients that stimulate the growth of Sargassum and other organisms in the surrounding environment. There have already been cases of Vibrio-related deaths linked to foodborne illnesses, such as after consuming raw oysters, reports NBC Miami.

There are different strains of Vibrio, but some can cause fatal illnesses when eaten through seafood or through contact with open wounds.  The bacteria thrives in warm brackish seawater, making people with open wounds susceptible to exposure.  Researchers have found that certain strains of Vibrio target both plant and animal hosts.  The concern is that as more people come into contact with Sargassum seaweed and plastic marine debris increases during the summer months, the risks increase.

There are different strains of Vibrio, but some can cause fatal illnesses when eaten through seafood or through contact with open wounds. The bacteria thrives in warm brackish seawater, making people with open wounds susceptible to exposure. Researchers have found that certain strains of Vibrio target both plant and animal hosts. The concern is that as more people come into contact with Sargassum seaweed and plastic marine debris increases during the summer months, the risks increase.

The flesh-eating Vibrio bacteria can colonize plastic debris, posing a potential risk to humans.  A leafy brown algae adorned with what look like berries, the algae floats in the open ocean and, unlike other algae, reproduces on the surface of the water, aided by air-filled structures that give it strength. buoyancy.  Sargassum is native to a large stretch of the Atlantic Ocean called the Sargasso Sea, which lies well off the southeastern United States.  The Sargasso have no land borders;  instead, four dominant ocean currents form its boundaries.

The flesh-eating Vibrio bacteria can colonize plastic debris, posing a potential risk to humans. A leafy brown algae adorned with what look like berries, the algae floats in the open ocean and, unlike other algae, reproduces on the surface of the water, aided by air-filled structures that give it strength. buoyancy. Sargassum is native to a large stretch of the Atlantic Ocean called the Sargasso Sea, which lies well off the southeastern United States. The Sargasso have no land borders; instead, four dominant ocean currents form its boundaries.

The state saw an increase in Vibrio cases in 2022 following Hurricane Ian when warm standing water may have allowed potentially deadly bacteria to grow.  Since 2011, there has also been a rapid expansion of Sargassum populations in the Sargasso Sea and other parts of the open ocean, leading to unprecedented algal accumulation events on beaches, including those in the south Florida.  Sargassum clusters serve as a habitat, food source, and breeding ground for various marine animals including fish, sea turtles, birds, etc.  As it accumulates, it makes for a rather unpleasant experience for beachgoers.  Sargassum piles up on beaches, where it quickly decomposes in the scorching sun, releasing gases that smell like rotten eggs.

The state saw an increase in Vibrio cases in 2022 following Hurricane Ian when warm standing water may have allowed potentially deadly bacteria to grow. Since 2011, there has also been a rapid expansion of Sargassum populations in the Sargasso Sea and other parts of the open ocean, leading to unprecedented algal accumulation events on beaches, including those in the south Florida. Sargassum clusters serve as a habitat, food source, and breeding ground for various marine animals including fish, sea turtles, birds, etc. As it accumulates, it makes for a rather unpleasant experience for beachgoers. Sargassum piles up on beaches, where it quickly decomposes in the scorching sun, releasing gases that smell like rotten eggs.

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