Walmart tests & # 039; Alphabot & # 039; who can pick up and pack customers & # 039; online shopping orders

Walmart announced Friday that it will soon incorporate automated robotic cars, called Alphabots, into one of its hypermarkets in Salem, New Hampshire.

A robot will soon be able to handle your purchases for you.

Walmart announced Friday that it will soon incorporate automated robotic cars, called Alphabots, into one of its large supermarkets in Salem, New Hampshire.

Alphabots can pick up and package orders online from buyers and complete mundane tasks in the hope of streamlining Walmart's online grocery service.

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Walmart announced Friday that it will soon incorporate automated robotic cars, called Alphabots, into one of its hypermarkets in Salem, New Hampshire.

Walmart announced Friday that it will soon incorporate automated robotic cars, called Alphabots, into one of its hypermarkets in Salem, New Hampshire.

"Alphabot will work behind the scenes to make the process even easier by automatically taking the items from storage to partners that will consolidate the items in the order," Mark Ibbotson, executive vice president of core operations at Walmart, said in a statement.

"For our collection partners, that means less time walking through the aisles of the store in search of products and more time to ensure that customers get the best in fresh products, meats, etc."

The retail giant installed a 20,000 square foot extension connected to the store that will house Alphabot.

There, buyers can pick up their orders online through drive through.

Alphabots will snatch the ordered items, which are stored as "warehouse style", and then transport them to Walmart associates at one of the four different stations.

You can pick up dry, refrigerated and frozen products.

The entire process occurs in the back of the store, so buyers can not see what is happening, Yahoo Finance said.

For now, Walmart is only testing Alphabots as part of a limited trial at its Salem store that it is doing in collaboration with Alert Innovation, the robotics startup.

Alphabots (in the photo) will snatch the ordered items, which are stored as "warehouse style", and then transport them to Walmart associates in one of the four different stations

Alphabots (in the photo) will snatch the ordered items, which are stored as "warehouse style", and then transport them to Walmart associates in one of the four different stations

Alphabots (in the photo) will snatch the ordered items, which are stored as "warehouse style", and then transport them to Walmart associates in one of the four different stations

For now, Walmart is only testing the Alphabots as part of a limited trial at its Salem store that it is doing in collaboration with the robotics company Alert Innovation.

For now, Walmart is only testing the Alphabots as part of a limited trial at its Salem store that it is doing in collaboration with the robotics company Alert Innovation.

For now, Walmart is only testing the Alphabots as part of a limited trial at its Salem store that it is doing in collaboration with the robotics company Alert Innovation.

Walmart said it plans to have Alphabot ready by the end of this year.

"Although this is a small driver, we expect great things," said Ibbotson.

"We have a lot to learn about this new technology, and we are excited about the possibilities of how we can use it to make the future of shopping, and work, even better."

Along with Alphabots, Walmart is also introducing Pickup Towers in more of its stores to streamline its online shopping service.

Pickup Towers are already in 200 of Walmart's retail stores, but the company plans to launch another 500 in stores nationwide by the end of the year.

The Torres Recolectoras (pictured) is already in 200 of Walmart's retail stores, but the company plans to launch another 500 in stores nationwide by the end of the year.

The Torres Recolectoras (pictured) is already in 200 of Walmart's retail stores, but the company plans to launch another 500 in stores nationwide by the end of the year.

The Torres Recolectoras (pictured) is already in 200 of Walmart's retail stores, but the company plans to launch another 500 in stores nationwide by the end of the year.

Now, the towers will not only store grocery orders, but also larger items purchased online, such as televisions, in separate lockers.

Both services are just another way for Walmart to compete better with Amazon and Whole Foods.

Recently, Walmart has doubled its offensive moves against Amazon, launching shelf scanning inventory robots, floor cleaning robots and other artifacts in order to reduce costs and make its workforce operate more efficiently.

HOW IS WALMART HARNESSING TECHNOLOGY TO COMPETE WITH ITS RIVALS?

Last year, Walmart revealed that it will launch shelf scanning robots in more than 50 stores in the US. UU To replenish inventory faster and save employees time when the products run out.

Robots approximately 2 feet (0.61 meters) come with a tower that is equipped with cameras that scan corridors to verify stock and identify lost and misplaced items, incorrect prices and incorrect labeling.

The robots pass that data to store employees, who then store the shelves and correct the errors.

Exhausted items are a big problem for retailers as they lose sales every time a buyer can not find a product on store shelves.

Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, has been testing shelf scanning robots at some stores in Arkansas, Pennsylvania and California.

And, one of the best opportunities for Walmart Inc to face Amazon.com Inc in e-commerce resides in six giant server farms, each of more than ten football fields.

These facilities, which cost Walmart millions of dollars and took almost five years to build, are beginning to pay off.

The retailer's online sales have been on the verge of being depleted for the last three consecutive quarters, far exceeding the broader industry growth levels.

Fueling this increase are thousands of proprietary servers that allow the company to reduce data segments of internal customers almost unlimitedly.

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