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Images of project host Waleed Aly have been used as part of a bitcoin investment scam

Waleed Aly is entangled in & # 39; fake news & # 39; bitcoin investment scam after fraudsters use photos & # 39; s from the host of the project to encourage victims a & # 39; prosperity gap & # 39; to exploit

  • Images of Waleed Aly were used in Bitcoin Investment Scam on Facebook
  • His images have been used alongside former NSW prime minister Mike Baird
  • Facebook ads used images of both men to encourage users to buy bitcoin
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Images of project host Waleed Aly have been used as part of a bitcoin investment scam.

Hundreds of Facebook ads used Mr Aly's photo and fake quotes attributed to him.

The ads promote a & # 39; wealth loophole & # 39; and encourage readers to buy bitcoin.

The fake promotion also used images of former NSW Prime Minister Mike Baird and writes major Australian media brands, the ABC reported.

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Images of project host Waleed Aly have been used as part of a bitcoin investment scam

Images of project host Waleed Aly have been used as part of a bitcoin investment scam

The fake ads also used images of former NSW Prime Minister Mike Baird (photo) and attributes of major Australian media brands, the ABC reported

The fake ads also used images of former NSW Prime Minister Mike Baird (photo) and attributes of major Australian media brands, the ABC reported

The fake ads also used images of former NSW Prime Minister Mike Baird (photo) and attributes of major Australian media brands, the ABC reported

The advertisements are linked to a fake article that refers to an interview between Mr. Aly and Mr. Baird and encourages readers to buy cryptocurrency.

Being a director of the National Australia Bank (NAB), Mr. Baird is now investigating the & # 39; fake news & # 39; websites and advertisements.

A spokesperson for the NAB said the bank was aware and confirmed that Mr. Baird & # 39; has no links with the listed companies or products & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; We encourage Australians who come across these scam websites not to click on the links and to report where possible to the administrator of the platform on which the ads are hosted, & # 39; said the spokesman.

The articles try to tempt readers to buy bitcoin in a & # 39; pump and dump & # 39; scheme promising them a high payout.

In just three days, more than 75 sponsored messages from The Project host and former prime minister were shared on Facebook.

Although they were all the same ads, they appeared under different ID numbers, meaning that if they were reported as a scam, it would not affect the others.

The ads are linked to a fake article that specifically writes an interview between Mr. Aly and Mr. Baird (photo) and encourages readers to buy cryptocurrency

The ads are linked to a fake article that specifically writes an interview between Mr. Aly and Mr. Baird (photo) and encourages readers to buy cryptocurrency

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The ads are linked to a fake article that specifically writes an interview between Mr. Aly and Mr. Baird (photo) and encourages readers to buy cryptocurrency

Some users reported having seen multiple ads in one day, despite reporting multiple times.

A Facebook spokesperson said the social media company was working on stopping the ads and hopes users will help by reporting unreliable accounts.

& # 39; It is important to us that ads on Facebook are useful to people and not used to promote misleading behavior, such as misusing images of public figures to mislead people, & # 39; they said.

The ABC also succeeded in tracking the origin of the fake ads to a Facebook account created in Italy in the last two months.

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Daily Mail Australia has contacted NAB and Facebook for comments.

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