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Waitrose staff told to ‘pay back the time they take off to isolate themselves from the coronavirus’

Waitrose staff ‘are told to pay back when they take off to isolate themselves because of coronavirus’

  • The employee claims that staff have been told to pay up to two weeks’ leave
  • Whistleblower feared infectious personnel would return because they could not afford it
  • Nearly 1,400 John Lewis employees had to take leave after the UK stores closed

Waitrose is said to have its employees pay back the time they spend on self-isolation by coronavirus.

Supermarket bosses have told staff to pay up to two weeks’ leave if they isolate themselves or if they do so to protect someone else in their household.

Employees with serious underlying health problems are currently ‘fencing’ for 12 weeks and are unable to work or leave the house.

A whistleblower who works for the upscale grocery store told it The national they fear that infectious personnel will return to work and risk spreading the virus to others because they “cannot afford” to be free.

Waitrose (Milton Keynes store in the photo) causes its employees to pay back, pay back the time they spend on self-isolation by coronavirusy

Waitrose (Milton Keynes store in the photo) causes its employees to pay back, pay back the time they spend on self-isolation by coronavirusy

The anonymous employee told the newspaper, “Many people who have been working with Waitrose for centuries and who isolate themselves or protect family members are now getting phone calls saying they have to pay back time.

“It’s just a huge kick between the teeth. Most of the staff are very honest, but now they will have to lie and come to work even if they are not supposed to or pay between 74 and 78 hours if they are full-time two weeks and isolate themselves. ‘

Waitrose is owned by the John Lewis Partnership, which was forced to take nearly 1,400 employees on leave after John Lewis closed 50 stores across the country.

Some have been called in to assist Waitrose, but the whistleblower claims they are not facing the same “punitive” reimbursement measures as their peers.

John Lewis employees who ‘shield’ at home receive 100 percent of their salary during the 12 weeks that they are not working.

But the whistleblower Waitrose says their colleagues are “furious” that the two halves of the company are being treated differently and have escalated a complaint to senior management.

It was announced yesterday that all Waitrose employees will receive a £ 200 bonus for continuing to work during the deadly virus outbreak.

Shoppers are pictured in line at a Waitrose store in South London

Shoppers are pictured in line at a Waitrose store in South London

Shoppers are pictured in line at a Waitrose store in South London

Waitrose has taken a number of measures both in-store and at home delivery to protect employees and customers from COVID-19.

Last weekend, couples were forbidden to shop together to increase capacity in stores, while still maintaining social distance.

As with many other supermarkets, tape has been placed on the floor to keep shoppers 6ft apart and the queues are evenly distributed.

A Waitrose spokesperson told the newspaper that staff are asking for “time bank whenever possible.”

They added: “We understand that this isn’t possible for everyone, so each case is reviewed on an individual basis and discussed with their manager. The health of our partners is our absolute priority.

“We have counseled partners who may have a suppressed immune system to consult their primary care provider about their specific needs before discussing work adjustments with their manager.”

MailOnline has contacted Waitrose for further comments.

As with many other supermarkets, tape has been placed on the floor to keep shoppers 6ft apart and the queues are evenly distributed (Kensington store in West London pictured)

As with many other supermarkets, tape has been placed on the floor to help shoppers 1.8 meters apart and the queues are evenly distributed (Kensington store in West London pictured)

As with many other supermarkets, tape has been placed on the floor to help shoppers 1.8 meters apart and the queues are evenly distributed (Kensington store in West London pictured)

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