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WA surfer wakes up from coma days before the family would take him from his livelihood

A deeply saddened family was about to turn off the life support of big wave surfer after suffering a brain aneurysm at the last minute

  • Targe Hough was left comatose after a brain aneurysm last February
  • The 22-year-old woke up a few days before his family wanted to unplug the power cord
  • The Harvey, WA, began to show signs before arriving four weeks later

Targe Hough, 22, from Harvey, Western Australia, collapsed last year after an aneurysm

Targe Hough, 22, from Harvey, Western Australia, collapsed last year after an aneurysm

A surfer who remained comatose after an enormous brain aneurysm made a miraculous recovery – just a few days before his family would take his living away from him.

Targe Hough, from Harvey, Western Australia, collapsed last year after experiencing what he initially thought was migraine during exercise.

The 22-year-old’s family would later hear that he had torn a blood vessel in his brain because of an arterial venous malformation – a condition that affects less than one percent of people.

The young surfer spent three days bedridden in a coma, and three weeks addicted to livelihood, when his family started thinking about the power cord.

“One time while we were surfing, Targe and I had talked about what would happen if something ever happened to us, Targe actually said,” If I don’t have a good quality of life, I wouldn’t want to come back, ” “his father told the West Australian.

The young surfer spent three days in bed in a coma, and three weeks addicted to livelihood, when his family started thinking about pulling the plug

The young surfer spent three days in bed in a coma, and three weeks addicted to livelihood, when his family started thinking about pulling the plug

The young surfer spent three days in bed in a coma, and three weeks addicted to livelihood, when his family started thinking about pulling the plug

Targe believes that he has not suffered brain damage as a result of his training as a surfer, who taught him to hold his breath - and to go without oxygen - for a longer period of time

Targe believes that he has not suffered brain damage as a result of his training as a surfer, who taught him to hold his breath - and to go without oxygen - for a longer period of time

Targe believes that he has not suffered brain damage as a result of his training as a surfer, who taught him to hold his breath – and to go without oxygen – for a longer period of time

After consultation with the rest of the family and confronted with a ‘gloomy’ prognosis, the Houghs came to an agreement to say goodbye.

But fate intervened when a new doctor came in and advised the family to wait a few more days.

Within that time, Targe suddenly began to show signs of life, move slowly, and finally woke up four weeks later.

Targe is now on his way to recovery after spending five months in the hospital learning to walk, talk and eat again.

Despite a debilitating recovery process, he revealed that he had suffered no brain damage thanks to his training as a surfer, who taught him how to hold his breath for a long time.

“I was without oxygen for a long time, doctors said afterwards that I should have brain damage, but I think I was used to holding my breath,” he said.

“Everything I did to train for the surf saved my life that day.”

Targe will receive radiation therapy this week.

Despite a debilitating recovery process, Targe (pictured with his family) revealed that he hardly suffered any brain damage thanks to his training as a surfer, who taught him how to hold his breath for a longer period of time

Despite a debilitating recovery process, Targe (pictured with his family) revealed that he hardly suffered any brain damage thanks to his training as a surfer, who taught him how to hold his breath for a longer period of time

Despite a debilitating recovery process, Targe (pictured with his family) revealed that he hardly suffered any brain damage thanks to his training as a surfer, who taught him how to hold his breath for a longer period of time

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