Volcanic activity was NOT the cause of the dinosaur extinction

Volcanic activity was NOT the cause of the dinosaur extinction: scientists claim that eruptions may have shaped life on Earth after an asteroid attack

  • Some experts have suggested that volcanic activity in India has caused extinction
  • The release of greenhouse gases would have raised global temperatures
  • However, an investigation into the timing of gas release suggests that it was before dying
  • Instead, this suggests that extinction was indeed the result of an asteroid impact

Volcanic activity was not the cause of the extinction of the dinosaurs, as has been suggested, a new study into old gas release has been found.

Instead, the dinosaurs were indeed wiped out by an asteroid attack about 66 million years ago, with outbursts that possibly shaped life after the impact.

Some researchers have claimed that the dinosaurs were already extinct when the size of the city crashed on the coast of Mexico near the city of Chicxulub.

It was suggested that lava known from a volcanic area in India, known as the Deccan Traps, had released greenhouse gases and had raised global temperatures.

However, American researchers discovered that most of the gas release took place long before the massive extinction, known as the Cretaceous Paleogene (K – Pg) event.

Given this, the environmental impact of volcanism has probably not contributed to the death of the dinosaurs, the international team concludes.

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Volcanic activity was not the cause of the extinction of the dinosaurs, as has been suggested, a new study of old gas release has shown

Volcanic activity was not the cause of the extinction of the dinosaurs, as has been suggested, a new study of old gas release has shown

“Many people have speculated that volcanoes matter [the] K – Pg, and we say, “No, they didn’t,” said geologist Pincelli Hull of Yale University in Connecticut.

It is generally accepted by the scientific community that extinction occurred at the end of the Cretaceous period after a six-mile wide asteroid was struck against the earth.

At least 75 percent of all species on Earth disappeared at that time – including the dinosaurs – a mass that would die along with volcanic activity.

“Volcanoes can cause massive extinctions because they release many gases, such as sulfur and carbon dioxide, that can change the climate and acidify the world,” said Dr. Hull.

“But recent work focuses on the timing of lava eruption rather than gas leakage.”

Instead dr. Hull and colleagues the global temperature changes and the record of carbon chemicals from marine fossils with models of the climate impact of massive carbon dioxide emissions.

They discovered that at least 50 percent of gas release occurred well before the asteroid impact – suggesting that the latter should be the only cause of extinction.

Researchers compared global temperature changes (photo) and the record of carbon chemicals from marine fossils with models of the climate effect of carbon dioxide release

Researchers compared global temperature changes (photo) and the record of carbon chemicals from marine fossils with models of the climate effect of carbon dioxide release

Researchers compared global temperature changes (photo) and the record of carbon chemicals from marine fossils with models of the climate effect of carbon dioxide release

“Volcanic activity in the late Cretaceous period caused a gradual global warming of around two degrees, but no massive extinction,” said paper co-author and geochemist Yale Michael Henehan, who compiled the temperature records.

“A number of species moved to the North and South Pole, but far back before the asteroid hit,” he added.

Recent work on the Deccan Traps in western Central India – the largest volcanic element on the face of the Earth – has also pointed to massive eruptions that have occurred in the immediate aftermath of K – Pg mass extinction.

These results have confused scientists because there is no warming that fits this activity.

However, the new study also suggests an answer to this puzzle.

It was suggested that lava known from a volcanic area in India, known as the Deccan Traps, had released greenhouse gases and had raised global temperatures. However, American researchers discovered that most of the gas release took place long before the K-Pg died out

It was suggested that lava known from a volcanic area in India, known as the Deccan Traps, had released greenhouse gases and had raised global temperatures. However, American researchers discovered that most of the gas release took place long before the K-Pg died out

It was suggested that lava known from a volcanic area in India, known as the Deccan Traps, had released greenhouse gases and had raised global temperatures. However, American researchers discovered that most of the gas release took place long before the K-Pg died out

“The K – Pg extinction was a massive extinction and this has radically changed the global carbon cycle,” added paper author and Yale geochemist Donald Penman.

“Our results show that these changes would allow the ocean to absorb a huge amount of CO2 in the long run – perhaps hiding the warming effects of volcanism in the aftermath of the event.”

However, the researchers said that volcanic gases may have played an important role in shaping the emergence of different species after extinction, rather than controlling the first event.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Science.

WHAT HAS THE DINOSAUR KILLED?

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half of the world’s species were destroyed.

This massive extinction paved the way for the emergence of mammals and the appearance of humans.

The Chicxulub asteroid is often mentioned as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene.

The asteroid struck a shallow sea in what is now the Gulf of Mexico.

The collision released a huge dust and soot cloud that caused global climate change, wiping out 75 percent of all animal and plant species.

Researchers claim that the soot needed for such a global catastrophe could only have come from a direct impact on rocks in shallow water around Mexico, which are particularly rich in hydrocarbons.

Experts believe that a huge tsunami tore through the Gulf Coast within 10 hours of the impact.

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half of the world's species were destroyed. The asteroid Chicxulub is often mentioned as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene (stock image)

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half of the world's species were destroyed. The asteroid Chicxulub is often mentioned as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene (stock image)

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half of the world’s species were destroyed. The asteroid Chicxulub is often mentioned as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene (stock image)

This caused earthquakes and landslides in areas as far as Argentina.

But while the waves and outbursts were The creatures that lived then did not just suffer from the waves – the heat was much worse.

During the investigation of the event, researchers found small pieces of rock and other debris that were shot into the air when the asteroid crashed.

These small particles, called spherules, covered the planet with a thick layer of soot.

Experts explain that losing the light from the sun caused a complete collapse of the water system.

This is because the phytoplankton base of almost all aquatic food chains would have been eliminated.

It is believed that the more than 180 million years of evolution that brought the world to Cretaceous was destroyed in less than the lifetime of a Tyrannosaurus rex, which is around 20 to 30 years.

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