Virginia family of eight who were detained in Colorado after the & # 39; mono & # 39; of the 16 year old son turned out to be leukemia

A family of eight from Virginia are stuck in Colorado after their son has received a shocking diagnosis of cancer.

Nick and Melissa Thomas were on their way back home from a cruise in Alaska with their six children when their eldest son Marshall began to fall ill.

The 16-year-old was diagnosed with mononucleosis before the trip and reportedly felt better after taking antibiotics.

But when the Thomases landed in Denver on Saturday to make their connecting flight, he was so weak that he could barely walk, according to Denver 7.

Marshall was rushed to the hospital, where he was diagnosed with leukemia, a blood cancer.

Marshall Thomas, 16 (photo), from Suffolk, Virginia, was diagnosed with mononucleosis earlier this month, but was released to go to Alaska on a family visit

Marshall Thomas, 16 (photo), from Suffolk, Virginia, was diagnosed with mononucleosis earlier this month, but was released to go to Alaska on a family visit

Marshall gradually became weaker during the trip. When his family flew to Denver, Colorado on Saturday to make their connecting flight, he could barely walk. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, far left)

Marshall gradually became weaker during the trip. When his family flew to Denver, Colorado on Saturday to make their connecting flight, he could barely walk. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, far left)

Marshall gradually became weaker during the trip. When his family flew to Denver, Colorado on Saturday to make their connecting flight, he could barely walk. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, far left)

& # 39; It's like walking in a fog. With only one foot in front of the other & # 39; Marshall's mother, Melissa, said to Denver 7. & # 39; It just feels unreal. & # 39;

A week before the family went on vacation, Marshall was diagnosed with mononucleosis, also known as mono.

Doctors told his parents that it would be good to go on a trip as long as he took antibiotics.

Marshall's parents say he was starting to feel better, but by the end of the journey he was starting to feel weak again.

& # 39; He's a pretty athletic kid. Strong as an ox. Don't get sick at all, & his father, Nick, told the station.

The Thomases flew to Denver on Saturday to take their connecting flight back home to Suffolk, Virginia. Marshall could barely walk by the time they landed.

& # 39; The flight attendant suggested that we look at him paramedically after landing, & # 39; said Melissa.

Paramedics examined Marshall and advised him to take him to the Colorado Children's Hospital in Aurora.

It was there that the teenager was diagnosed with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

ALL is a type of cancer in which the bone marrow produces too many immature white blood cells called lymphocytes.

They displace normal white blood cells, making it harder for the body to fight infection.

Symptoms include shortness of breath, easy bruising, frequent bleeding and chronic infections.

Because ALL attacks the cells that fight infection, patients often develop throat infections, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

& # 39; Acute & # 39; means the disease as an opportunity to spread rapidly throughout the body, meaning that early treatment is vital, including chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant.

Thomas was rushed to the hospital, where he was diagnosed with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a blood cancer. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, far left)

Thomas was rushed to the hospital, where he was diagnosed with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a blood cancer. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, far left)

Thomas was rushed to the hospital, where he was diagnosed with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a blood cancer. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, far left)

Doctors told Thomas & # 39; s family that he had to stay in hospital for a month to be treated. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, center)

Doctors told Thomas & # 39; s family that he had to stay in hospital for a month to be treated. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, center)

Doctors told Thomas & # 39; s family that he had to stay in hospital for a month to be treated. Pictured: the Thomas family with Marshall (back row, center)

The American Cancer Society estimates that nearly 6,000 adults will be diagnosed with ALL in 2019 and that approximately 1,500 will die.

According to a closed Facebook group, the former nanny of the Thomases, who lives in Denver, took care of the family.

& # 39; She's moving out of the state next week, so we have to find a place for our family, & # 39; Melissa said to Denver 7.

Doctors have told Marshall's parents that he must stay in Colorado for a month, but that there is a 90 percent chance that he will heal.

Marshall, however, has had to deal with various health problems in the past four days.

Since he was in the hospital, he has been in a septic shock, which occurs when sepsis leads to life-threatening low blood pressure.

In addition, according to a recent Facebook update, a CT scan on Tuesday found an infection – probably staph – possible fungus in the Marshall lungs that is currently being cleared with an antibiotic and an antifungal mediation.

& # 39; The doctors here have given us a lot of hope, and everyone seems very self-assured, but it is clearly not a path that someone wants to travel, & # 39; Melissa told Denver 7.

The family is now asking for donations so that they can find a place to stay while Marshall is being treated.

If you want to donate, you can do that via PayPal with the email address MarchForMarshall@gmail.com or via the Denver Channel 7 gives program.

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