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An ancient ritual in which family members remove one of them from their graves every year to cleanse and restore them has had interested and confused people for decades

Excavating the dead: villagers remove the corpses of loved ones in Bali so that they can be cleaned, dressed in new clothes – and even given a cigarette

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT
  • The annual death ritual of an Indonesian tribe has interested the world for generations
  • The Toraja Death Rituals, named after the Torajan tribe, are held every August
  • The bodies of deceased family members are removed from graves and cleaned
  • The rituals are an integral part of the tribe's belief in life and death
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An ancient ritual in which family members remove their deceased loved ones from their tombs every year to restore them has had interested and confused people for decades.

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The Toraja Death Rituals, named after the indigenous Indonesian tribe known as the Torajans, are considered their greatest celebration of life, with the belief that a connection between life and death is infinite.

In the Torajan culture, death is considered the most important aspect of life and, as a result, their funeral rituals can sometimes last for years.

An ancient ritual in which family members remove one of them from their graves every year to cleanse and restore them has had interested and confused people for decades

An ancient ritual in which family members remove one of them from their graves every year to cleanse and restore them has had interested and confused people for decades

The Toraja Death Rituals, named after the indigenous Indonesian tribe known as the Torajans, are considered to be their greatest celebration of life and that a connection between life and death is infinite

The Toraja Death Rituals, named after the indigenous Indonesian tribe known as the Torajans, are considered to be their greatest celebration of life and that a connection between life and death is infinite

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The Toraja Death Rituals, named after the indigenous Indonesian tribe known as the Torajans, are considered to be their greatest celebration of life and that a connection between life and death is infinite

The body of a deceased loved one is kept in the parental home and is always honored by those left behind.

In recent years, mummification has become commonplace for maintaining the body.

The family may need months or even years to go through the grieving process and prepare for the funeral.

But after the funeral, the family returns to their loved ones' graves every August for the Ma & # 39; Nene festival.

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Traditionally, the deceased are buried in hollowed-out caves that are collected by family every 12 months to clean the corpse.

However, after the funeral, the family will return to the grave of their loved ones and remove them every August for the Ma & # 39; Nene festival every August

However, after the funeral, the family will return to the grave of their loved ones and remove them every August for the Ma & # 39; Nene festival every August

However, after the funeral, the family will return to the grave of their loved ones and remove them every August for the Ma & # 39; Nene festival every August

Traditionally, the deceased are buried in hollowed out caves and are collected every year by family to clean the corpse & # 39;

Traditionally, the deceased are buried in hollowed out caves and are collected every year by family to clean the corpse & # 39;

Traditionally, the deceased are buried in hollowed out caves and are collected every year by family to clean the corpse & # 39;

The corpse is removed from the grave, cleaned, repaired and then moved and interacted as if it were still alive
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The corpse is removed from the grave, cleaned, repaired and then moved and interacted as if it were still alive

The corpse is removed from the grave, cleaned, repaired and then moved and interacted as if it were still alive

The corpse is removed from the grave, cleaned, repaired and then moved and interacted as if it were still alive.

Under the trunk it becomes like a & # 39; second funeral & # 39; and they will often use the corpse again with items such as money, cigarettes and new clothing.

Head of the Torajan branch of AMAN, Eric Crystal told Rante Allo The Sydney Morning Herald although it may seem strange to outsiders, it is an important part of the culture.

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& # 39; Toraja people believe that the spirit of the dead lives among us, the living, looking out for us, blessing us, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Therefore, before the funeral ritual is performed, they are called & # 39; makula, or simply sick, not yet dead. The people of Toraja greatly respect their dead. & # 39;

Visitors are welcome to visit the area during the ritual month of August and are encouraged to participate in the festivities.

Under the trunk it becomes like a & # 39; second funeral & # 39; considered and often they will re-use the corpse with items such as money, cigarettes and fine clothing

Under the trunk it becomes like a & # 39; second funeral & # 39; considered and often they will re-use the corpse with items such as money, cigarettes and fine clothing

Under the trunk it becomes like a & # 39; second funeral & # 39; considered and often they will re-use the corpse with items such as money, cigarettes and fine clothing

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