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Video shows sheriff’s deputies on a boat chasing the paddle boarder behind Malibu after he braved the closure

A paddle surfer was arrested by authorities in Southern California after ignoring instructions from lifeguards to get out of the ocean for at least 30 minutes, despite the fact that the beaches across the country have been closed due to the corona virus outbreak.

Bystanders recorded a video of the incident near Malibu Pier on Thursday.

It showed a man on a paddle board sliding into the choppy water, while lifeguards told him to come back ashore.

But authorities said that when the paddle boarder refused to listen, lifeguards asked the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s department for help.

A lifeboat and a LASD boat approached the pier, and the man on the paddleboard was eventually taken into custody.

A paddle boarder can be seen below as a lifeboat approaches near Malibu Pier on Thursday

A paddle boarder can be seen below as a lifeboat approaches near Malibu Pier on Thursday

The paddle boarder would have refused to come out of the water for 30 minutes despite lifeguards ordering him to do so

The paddle boarder would have refused to come out of the water for 30 minutes despite lifeguards ordering him to do so

The paddle boarder would have refused to come out of the water for 30 minutes despite lifeguards ordering him to do so

Lifeguards called the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department for help after the paddle boarder reportedly refused to leave the water

Lifeguards called the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department for help after the paddle boarder reportedly refused to leave the water

Lifeguards called the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department for help after the paddle boarder reportedly refused to leave the water

The man was arrested on suspicion of disobeying a lifeguard and violating a home order from Governor Gavin Newsom.

Images posted on social media show that the man is handcuffed by at least two sheriff deputies who have also confiscated his administration.

The suspect was booked at a sheriff’s station in Calabasas and released on a promise to appear in court, the sheriff’s department said.

If convicted, he will receive a maximum sentence of six months’ imprisonment or a fine of $ 1,000.

Experts say it is dangerous to get into the waters of the ocean because there is a chance that swimmers or surfers may catch coronavirus.

Kim Prather, an atmospheric chemist with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told it Los Angeles Times that bacteria and pathogens often enter the ocean after heavy rainfall.

She said that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, could similarly penetrate water along the coast and then flow back into the air along the coast.

Two deputies from the Sheriff accompany the Paddle Board, who is handcuffed after surrendering

Two deputies from the Sheriff accompany the Paddle Board, who is handcuffed after surrendering

Two deputies from the Sheriff accompany the Paddle Board, who is handcuffed after surrendering

A deputy from a sheriff is seen on Thursday with the suspect's board in Malibu

A deputy from a sheriff is seen on Thursday with the suspect's board in Malibu

A deputy from a sheriff is seen on Thursday with the suspect’s board in Malibu

“I wouldn’t go into the water if you paid me $ 1 million now,” she said.

Prather said that’s why locals not only avoid the beach, but also keep their distance from the coast. That means biking, jogging, or a brisk walk by the ocean should also be avoided.

She said the new coronavirus appears to be light enough to float much further through the air than is believed.

Prather said that people on the beach become even more sensitive, as there are usually strong winds that can blow viral particles faster than conditions would allow if people were further inland.

“It won’t kill you if you miss a few surf sessions, but it can if you go out and get in the wrong air,” she said.

“You can’t see the virus, you can’t smell it … It’s a real silent killer right now.”

Cloud testing problems of the California virus outbreak

California is ramping up testing for coronavirus, even as the backlog of 59,000 ongoing tests is on the rise, leaving some people unable to get results for 12 days and leaving an incomplete picture of how widespread the outbreak is in the state.

Tests have slowly rolled out in California, but are now accelerating.

More than 90,000 tests have been conducted across the state, but according to state figures, nearly two-thirds of those results were still pending.

“The backlogs are not necessarily getting better, in real time, but we have hope,” Newsom said Thursday.

Newsom said it was a national problem – as was the lack of testing and the lack of masks, gloves, and other protection health workers must wear to take tests on people who may be carrying the highly contagious virus.

California Governor Gavin Newsom (seen above in Sacramento on Friday) acknowledged that his state is vastly behind on coronavirus tests that have been conducted, but the results of which are pending

California Governor Gavin Newsom (seen above in Sacramento on Friday) acknowledged that his state is vastly behind on coronavirus tests that have been conducted, but the results of which are pending

California Governor Gavin Newsom (seen above in Sacramento on Friday) acknowledged that his state is vastly behind on coronavirus tests that have been conducted, but the results of which are pending

The state may be able to accelerate test results as more people receive blood-based tests, Newsom said.

Tests that rely on nasal swabs, the most prominent first test measure, are mainly responsible for delays.

The average waiting time in Los Angeles County is five to six days, but some results have lasted 10 or 12 days, said Barbara Ferrer, the county health director.

The province uses a mix of private and public labs.

Increasing the number of tests without the capacity to process volume in labs “doesn’t really help us as much as it should if people really wait a long time to find out if they’re positive,” Ferrer said.

“It is very important for us to know if they are positive – both for their medical treatment and so that we can immediately isolate those people, identify their close contacts and quarantine their close contacts.”

The coronavirus is mainly spread through coughing and sneezing.

In most people, it causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as a fever and cough, that disappear within two to three weeks.

Fremont firefighters take over information and vital signs from a motorist during the first phase of a COVID-19 test during the Friday coronavirus outbreak in Fremont

Fremont firefighters take over information and vital signs from a motorist during the first phase of a COVID-19 test during the Friday coronavirus outbreak in Fremont

Fremont firefighters take over information and vital signs from a motorist during the first phase of a COVID-19 test during the Friday coronavirus outbreak in Fremont

For some, especially the elderly and those with pre-existing health problems, it can cause a more serious illness, including pneumonia and death.

California has surpassed more than 10,000 cases and 238 deaths, according to a worldwide survey by Johns Hopkins University.

State health officials are engaged in a spike of things expected in mid-May and could fill all 75,000 state hospital beds and 66,000 emergency beds now assembled in hospitals and other locations.

Newsom has for weeks emphasized that the state should smooth out the curve of things so that the peak arrives as late as possible and gives the state time to prepare for it.

Having accurate and up-to-date test data is key to following that curve.

Newsom said he has put together a new testing task force and expects to announce an attempt in the coming days to significantly increase testing capacity in California.

Currently, the state has prioritized testing used on the most symptomatic and frail patients, along with health professionals and some others.

That further obscures an image of an outbreak.

“Tests are uneven, that is, friendly,” says Dr. David Eisenman, director of the Center of Public Health and Disasters at the University of California, Los Angeles.

“The number of identified cases is not an accurate count of anything, because it is such a select group of people who get the tests done.”

Dr. Shawn Nasseri, a Beverly Hills physician, said it is frustrating and daunting to try to diagnose patients when he has rationed only a few test kits per week.

He was able to run six tests a week ago on a drive-thru line in the alley behind his office and was still waiting for results from one of those on Thursday.

“We all fly blind. We hope and pray that more tests will become available, “said Nasseri.

“We have absolutely no idea how many people are really infected at the moment.”

Waiting for a test and the time it takes to get results varies by province and a mix of hospitals and private testing labs.

Marin County, which relies on testing at a state lab, is limited to running 50 tests a day, spokeswoman Laine Hendricks said.

It takes two to three days for the state to produce results.

Sonoma County, which did not report a backlog, can test 100 kits a day in its own lab and get results in 24 hours or less, said spokeswoman Jennifer Larocque.

Orange County’s own lab strives for a two-day turnaround for the 80 to 100 tests it handles per day, but often completes them within 12 to 24 hours, said Megan Crumpler, director of Orange County’s Orange Health Laboratory.

“We are lucky not to be flooded,” said Crumpler.

Riverside County said its own lab takes one to three days to process the results, although private labs take five to seven days, said Jose Arballo Jr of the county’s public health department.

Waiting for test results for those who are concerned that they have coronavirus can be stressful, said Michelle Bertinelli, who was tested in Los Angeles after her mother, who had recently seen them, discovered she was infected after she contracted the virus was exposed.

Bertinelli waited in her car in line for two and a half hours at a drive-thru test site before receiving a cotton swab with instructions to self-administer.

She was told she would get results in three days.

But as the days passed, she felt she had a cold from the “stress of not knowing.”

It took a full week to get results that she didn’t have COVID-19.

However, her roommate tested positive, so Bertinelli returned to be retested on Wednesday.

The wait has started again and the stress has worsened as she and the infected roommate share a bathroom.

“I stay in my room pretty much all day, and going to the bathroom feels like a death sentence every time,” she said.

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