Video shows Prince Harry impersonating the Queen in BBC tribute

Prince Harry imitated the Queen in a cheeky moment in last night’s BBC tribute documentary to the Duke of Edinburgh.

The Duke of Sussex, 37, showed his best impression of his grandmother when he appeared on Prince Philip: The Royal Family Remembers to discuss his grandfather’s love of flying.

Participating in his first ‘family project’ since he gave up his royal duties and moved to the US, Harry was spotted through qualified pilot Philip’s flight logs from a trip to Africa in 1983.

The duke said, ‘He did all the flying himself, or at least parts of it. When you fly, you don’t get an easy pass because you are the Duke of Edinburgh. You have to put in a lot of effort and prove your skills.

“But he also had an amazing privilege of getting behind the controls and flying airplanes around the world.

“I can imagine my grandmother having a cup of tea in the back of an airplane, going through turbulence and saying, ‘Oh Philip! What are you doing?’

The Duke of Sussex (pictured), 37, showed his best impression of his grandmother when he appeared on Prince Philip: The Royal Family Remembers to discuss his grandfather’s love of flying

Harry also discussed how he missed his grandfather’s sense of humor, but added: “I miss him more for my grandmother because I know how incredibly strong she was there with him. I also know she’ll be fine without him.’

He added: “The two of them together were just the cutest couple. For me, knowing the audacity of him and knowing that behind what the world sees are two individuals who were deeply in love and both, from a very young age, have devoted their lives to service… that is an incredible bond between two people. ‘

In the programme, William revealed how the Duke of Edinburgh would get his grandchildren to hold a tube of mustard in their hands and then take the lid off when they were barbecuing at Balmoral.

By participating in his first

Taking part in his first ‘family project’ since he resigned from his royal duties and moved to the US, Harry was seen through flight logs of qualified pilot Philip (pictured in 1953) from a trip to Africa in 1983.

The Queen and Prince Philip at the Braemar Highland Games in Scotland, September 2008

The Queen and Prince Philip at the Braemar Highland Games in Scotland, September 2008

William recalled, laughing, “He squeezed your hands together to shoot the mustard into the ceiling.

“He had a lot of trouble with my grandmother because he covered most of the places we had lunch with mustard on the ceiling.”

His cousin, Peter Phillips, added that the tracks are still there.

In the programme, which aired on BBC One last night, all of Prince Philip’s children and adult grandchildren reminisced about him.

Interviews were filmed before and after Prince Philip's death in April, and were conducted separately, with Prince Harry's tribute being filmed in the US, where he lives, after he leaves his royal duty.  Pictured, Harry and Philip in 2014

Interviews were filmed before and after Prince Philip’s death in April, and were conducted separately, with Prince Harry’s tribute being filmed in the US, where he lives, after he leaves his royal duty. Pictured, Harry and Philip in 2014

Interviews began in early 2021 to celebrate Philip’s 100th birthday in June, but the program turned into a touching tribute to the Queen’s husband after he peacefully slipped away on April 9, two months before his big day.

All interviewees admitted that Philip was a man of his generation and upbringing – and did not like to let fools suffer.

Prince Charles described how his father would watch him play football as a child and yell from the sidelines, ‘Stop scratching your behind and do something!’

Elsewhere, Prince William (pictured) recalled how the Duke of Edinburgh would get his grandchildren to hold a tube of mustard in their hands and then take the lid off when they were barbecuing in Balmoral

Elsewhere, Prince William (pictured) recalled how the Duke of Edinburgh would get his grandchildren to hold a tube of mustard in their hands and then take the lid off when they were barbecuing in Balmoral

But everyone agreed that he was a man like no other and one who left a huge void in their lives.

William added: “He’s always been the heart of the family and he’s always been a huge presence behind everything we’ve done, really.

“It was a man’s world back then, so for a man to give up his career to support a woman, albeit the queen, was another pretty big step.”

The documentary makers entered Buckingham Palace to meet the Duke’s long-standing staff and capture his study, private office and library as they were during his seven decades of public service.

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