Victoria's father is hit with $ 200,000 in council costs after he has tried to build a swimming pool for his children

Father who bought his neighbor's house so that he could build a swimming pool for his children, receives a $ 200,000 reimbursement from a pedantial board

  • Paul Jones, from Elwood, bought the property from his neighbor last November
  • The father of two was planning to build a swimming pool for his children with the new space
  • The Council in turn struck him with a $ 200,000 fee for the contribution to the public open space
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A Victorian father was furiously left behind after he had bought his neighbor's house so that he could build a swimming pool for his two children, but then he was hit with $ 200,000 in community costs.

Elwood resident Paul Jones planned to use the extra garden space for his project, but was told that he would have to pay a contribution to the public open space in case the site is subdivided in the future.

The municipality heard that combining the two plots would increase the size of the property to more than 650 m² – leaving room for possible development.

A Victorian father was furiously left behind after he had bought his neighbor's house so that he could build a swimming pool for his two children, but was hit with $ 200,000 in council costs (stock image)

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A Victorian father was furiously left behind after he had bought his neighbor's house so that he could build a swimming pool for his two children, but was hit with $ 200,000 in council costs (stock image)

Elwood resident Paul Jones planned to use the extra garden space for his project, but was told that he would have to pay a contribution to the public open space should the site be subdivided in the future

Elwood resident Paul Jones planned to use the extra garden space for his project, but was told that he would have to pay a contribution to the public open space should the site be subdivided in the future

Elwood resident Paul Jones planned to use the extra garden space for his project, but was told that he would have to pay a contribution to the public open space should the site be subdivided in the future

& # 39; In this case, the council is of the opinion that each parcel can be further subdivided – meaning that (an) exemption does not apply & # 39 ;, said acting mayor of Port Phillip Council Louise Crawford to The Herald Sun .

Jones has since assumed & # 39; absurd & # 39; and claimed that he would not spend more than $ 600,000 on his project to demolish it years later.

& # 39; I am a family man who wants to build a swimming pool for his two children, not a developer trying to block six mansions, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; What, so I have to pay around $ 200,000 in case someone buys my property and builds another house on it in 50 years? & # 39;

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Mrs. Crawford admitted that although a swimming pool in the back yard did not necessarily create a need for more space – a possible subdivision did.

Mr. Jones had been granted a building permit in which he did not have to pay the contribution, but he said he wanted the area to be part of his house and not of neighboring real estate.

Louise Crawford admitted that although a swimming pool in the back garden did not necessarily create a need for more space - a possible subdivision did

Louise Crawford admitted that although a swimming pool in the back garden did not necessarily create a need for more space - a possible subdivision did

Louise Crawford admitted that although a swimming pool in the back garden did not necessarily create a need for more space – a possible subdivision did

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