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Victorian man in his thirties fights for life in the hospital after being hit by the corona virus

A Victorian man who fights for hospital life is considered one of the youngest patients in Australia to fight the coronavirus in intensive care.

The news comes yet another horror day for the virus-stricken state with 270 new cases registered and two deaths.

Of the 1,803 active cases in Victoria, 85 are in the hospital, including 26 in intensive care, who rose by nine in 24 hours.

The Victorian Department of Health and Human Service has released more details on intensive care cases, the ages of which range from 30 to 80 years.

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It was a grim day in Victoria with 270 new cases of coronavirus. Pictured is a health worker who was willing to test residents in a public housing tower in Melbourne last week

It was a grim day in Victoria with 270 new cases of coronavirus. Pictured is a health worker who was willing to test residents in a public housing tower in Melbourne last week

Two men and two women in their forties are also in intensive care, along with a woman and four men in their fifties.

There are also four men and four women in their sixties, three men and three women in their seventies.

The two oldest patients, a man and a woman, are in the 1980s.

Fifteen ICU patients are men and 11 women.

All but five of the intensive care patients are ventilated.

Of the 1803 active cases in Victoria, 26 are in intensive care, including a man in his thirties. Pictured is a mobile test site in Melbourne's Fawkner suburb on Monday

Of the 1803 active cases in Victoria, 26 are in intensive care, including a man in his thirties. Pictured is a mobile test site in Melbourne's Fawkner suburb on Monday

Of the 1803 active cases in Victoria, 26 are in intensive care, including a man in his thirties. Pictured is a mobile test site in Melbourne’s Fawkner suburb on Monday

Most of Victoria’s ICU cases come from Melbourne’s northwestern corridor, according to Brett Sutton, the state’s chief health officer.

It comes a day after Richmond Tigers’ AFL star, Bachar Houli, revealed that his intensive care mother Yamama was seriously ill with the deadly virus when the national death toll rose to 110, including 26 in Victoria.

“My mother has been affected a lot. She is currently in intensive care and is undergoing severe treatment. The team at the ICU takes care of her. Her current state is mixed. God knows her situation best, ‘Houli explained in an emotional video on Monday.

“What burns and what really hurts is the fact that none of her relatives can visit her, which is very difficult.”

Bachar Houli (right) says it has been a hard time for his family with his mother Yamama (left) seriously ill with coronavirus

Bachar Houli (right) says it has been a hard time for his family with his mother Yamama (left) seriously ill with coronavirus

Bachar Houli (right) says it has been a hard time for his family with his mother Yamama (left) seriously ill with coronavirus

Professor Sutton estimates that another hundreds of coronavirus cases may be hospitalized in the next two weeks.

“That’s really a significant number of people with coronavirus and it does mean that in the next two weeks, we’ll be seeing some people who need a hospital,” he told reporters on Tuesday.

“There is often 10 to 20 percent of all coronavirus infections that need to be hospitalized, so that’s at least a few hundred.

“They will need to be hospitalized in the coming weeks.”

Several hundred cases of Victoria coronavirus will be hospitalized in the next two weeks. Pictured are the Australian Defense Force and Victorian Police at a vehicle checkpoint along the Princes Freeway on Monday

Several hundred cases of Victoria coronavirus will be hospitalized in the next two weeks. Pictured are the Australian Defense Force and Victorian Police at a vehicle checkpoint along the Princes Freeway on Monday

Several hundred cases of Victoria coronavirus will be hospitalized in the next two weeks. Pictured are the Australian Defense Force and Victorian Police at a vehicle checkpoint along the Princes Freeway on Monday

Professor Sutton said further restrictions could be considered to curb the spread of the community transfer.

“We would do the minimum requirement because we know how much of the tax is imposing on business and people’s lives, but if it is necessary to reduce the transmission then it must be in play,” he said.

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said it was too early to decide on any further restrictions, noting that the metropolis of Melbourne and Mitchell Shire are only stuck for six weeks.

He also confirmed that Victoria’s last returned foreign travelers would end hotel quarantine on Thursday.

International flights will be diverted from Melbourne indefinitely, meaning the state’s failed hotel quarantine program will be suspended.

An employee cleans her hands outside the Menarock Life elder care facility in the Melbourne suburb of Essendon, where 28 new infections were reported Tuesday

An employee cleans her hands outside the Menarock Life elder care facility in the Melbourne suburb of Essendon, where 28 new infections were reported Tuesday

An employee cleans her hands outside the Menarock Life elder care facility in the Melbourne suburb of Essendon, where 28 new infections were reported Tuesday

Meanwhile, experts say ‘all of New South Wales’ is now a coronavirus hotspot, as the NSW Prime Minister warns that Victoria’s COVID-19 outbreak has ‘undoubtedly’ reached Sydney.

NSW Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian made the grim statement Tuesday evening after the number of cases related to the Crossroads Hotel in Casula in southwest Sydney, 30. Of these, 14 attended the pub.

Although the source of the outbreak has not yet been determined, Ms Berejiklian said investigations show that the Victorian outbreak affected NSW.

“It is very likely that, given the changing situation in Victoria, NSW was exposed to the underlying community transfer from that state,” she said in Sydney on Tuesday.

It is because Dr. Robert Parker, president of the Australian Medical Association Northern Territory, called for all of NSW to be considered a “hot spot.”

He said NSW residents shouldn’t enter the NT when it opens its borders on July 17.

Queensland announced it would forbid residents of 77 suburbs in southwest Sydney to enter the Sunshine State.

“It is much safer to postpone NSW for another week – certainly open to South Australia, Western Australia, whatever – postpone NSW for another week, just to see the effect of this particular location and how far and wide the virus is spreading rather than having a fairly confident response, ‘said Mr. Parker at the ABC.

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