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Victoria launches the first-ever “truth-telling” process for Aboriginal Australians

Victoria Launches First-ever Truth-Telling Process To Get “Justice” For Aboriginal Australians – After Black Lives Matter Protests Engulfed The Country

  • Victoria will keep an indigenous truth and justice to heal past mistakes
  • It would be an important step towards reconciliation and confidence building
  • The trial addresses past and current issues of seeking justice for Aboriginal people

Victoria will launch a “truth-telling process” to investigate issues facing Aboriginal Australians after Black Lives Matter protests required change.

The committee will try to tell the ‘complete story’ of indigenous and past issues from the past and present.

It has been described as an important step in uncovering human rights violations and ongoing injustices against indigenous peoples.

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Gabrielle Williams said on Saturday that the trial was the first of its kind in Australia.

Victoria will launch a 'truth-telling trial' with Aboriginal Australians to tackle inustic (photo, Aboriginal protesters in Sydney on July 5)

Victoria will launch a ‘truth-telling trial’ with Aboriginal Australians to tackle inustic (photo, Aboriginal protesters in Sydney on July 5)

“There is nothing more powerful than the truth. Because honesty brings healing, ”said Ms. Williams.

“It takes courage on all sides to learn the truths of our past and understand its continuing consequences – establishing this process brings us one step closer to real reconciliation.”

Ms. Williams said the process would increase trust between indigenous peoples and government officials.

“We owe it to the Aboriginal Victorians to be honest and fair about the injustices they have faced – and they continue to face them,” she said.

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Gabrielle Williams (pictured) said Australians owe it to Aboriginal Victorians for the injustices they have faced and are still facing

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Gabrielle Williams (pictured) said Australians owe it to Aboriginal Victorians for the injustices they have faced and are still facing

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Gabrielle Williams (pictured) said Australians owe it to Aboriginal Victorians for the injustices they have faced and are still facing

Marcus Stewart, co-chair of the First Peoples’ Assembly, said The Guardian the process was an achievement that was only possible through decades of activism.

“I think Victoria is very good at telling one side of history, and now we have the opportunity to speak our truth,” he said.

“It is one of the most important milestones that I will probably see in my life.”

It follows weeks of protests in Australia where people took to the streets in solidarity with the death of George Floyd, who died after an American police officer knelt on his neck.

Protesters are seen in Melbourne (pictured on June 6) as Australians rallied in support of racial equality

Protesters are seen in Melbourne (pictured on June 6) as Australians rallied in support of racial equality

Protesters are seen in Melbourne (pictured on June 6) as Australians rallied in support of racial equality

Protests in Australia have also sought to raise awareness of similar issues facing Indigenous Australians.

Protesters held signs in states and territories in Australia referring to racially disproportionate detention in custody.

Similar measures have been introduced in New Zealand, Canada and South Africa to correct the injustices of indigenous peoples.

New Zealand has established several discussion bodies with Moari people in the past, as well as with the Race Relations mediator, all of whom have been welcomed on some level but have been criticized for not having the power to bring about real change.

Marcus Stewart, co-chair of the First Peoples' Assembly, said the launch of the process was the result of decades of activism (photo, protesters in Sydney on July 5)

Marcus Stewart, co-chair of the First Peoples' Assembly, said the launch of the process was the result of decades of activism (photo, protesters in Sydney on July 5)

Marcus Stewart, co-chair of the First Peoples’ Assembly, said the launch of the process was the result of decades of activism (photo, protesters in Sydney on July 5)

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