Victoria is introducing new laws for cyclists and motorists that can fine drivers $ 1,652

0

There are huge changes coming for drivers to keep ‘cyclists safe’ – and if you break the rules you will be fined $ 1,652

  • New rules in Victoria require motorists to give cyclists a wider berth when passing
  • Motorists must allow one meter of clearance when overtaking on 60 km / h roads
  • Two penalty points and a fine of $ 330 will be given for incorrect overtaking

New rules will come into effect in Victoria next week, requiring motorists to give cyclists a generous berth when they pass them on roads.

From Monday, drivers must give the driver at least one meter of play when overtaking on roads up to 60 km / h and 1.5 meters on roads with a maximum speed of more than 60 km / h.

Victoria was previously the only state with no minimum laws for passing distances.

Motorists in Victoria will have to give cyclists a generous berth from Monday when they pass them on roads (photo: cyclists in Melbourne)

Motorists in Victoria will have to give cyclists a generous berth from Monday when they pass them on roads (photo: cyclists in Melbourne)

Road Secretary Ben Carroll said 13 cyclists were killed on Victoria’s roads in 2020, up from the five-year average of 10 deaths.

‘Last year was a terrible year on our way for cyclists. These measures ensure that everyone has a safe place on our roads, ” he said in a statement on Friday.

‘This new rule provides a clear indication of how much space motorists should give cyclists when passing. We all share the roads and have to look out for each other. ‘

Under the updated rules, drivers and bikers can cross short painted lines to give cyclists the space they need – including solid lines, double lines, painted tramway lines, and painted islands – but only if they have a clear forward view and it is safe to do so.

The new rules come after 13 cyclists died on Victoria's roads in 2020 (photo: stock photo of cyclists riding along Yarra River)

The new rules come after 13 cyclists died on Victoria's roads in 2020 (photo: stock photo of cyclists riding along Yarra River)

The new rules come after 13 cyclists died on Victoria’s roads in 2020 (photo: stock photo of cyclists riding along Yarra River)

From Monday, drivers must give riders at least one meter of clearance when overtaking on roads up to 60 km / h (photo: cyclists on Melbourne roads)

From Monday, drivers must give riders at least one meter of clearance when overtaking on roads up to 60 km / h (photo: cyclists on Melbourne roads)

From Monday, drivers must give riders at least one meter of clearance when overtaking on roads up to 60 km / h (photo: cyclists on Melbourne roads)

Incorrect overtaking or passing of violations will result in two penalty points and a fine of $ 330 on the spot. If the case goes through court, the fine can be as high as $ 1,652.

Mr Carroll said cyclists should also obey traffic rules, including driving predictably, riding on bike lanes when provided and using hand signals to change direction.

The Amy Gillett Foundation, the national bicycle safety charity, welcomed the new rules.

“A meter is important because it can save a person’s life, and these traffic rules will help our community avoid the horrific impact of trauma on the road,” Dan Kneipp, CEO of the charity, said in a statement.

“Giving cyclists a safe place while riding keeps everyone safe, and most importantly, it makes cycling easier and more fun for Victorians.”

Incorrect overtaking or passing violations will incur two penalty points and on the spot fines of $ 330 and the fine can go up to $ 1,652 if it goes through court (photo: cyclists in Melbourne)

Incorrect overtaking or passing violations will incur two penalty points and on the spot fines of $ 330 and the fine can go up to $ 1,652 if it goes through court (photo: cyclists in Melbourne)

Incorrect overtaking or passing violations will incur two penalty points and on the spot fines of $ 330 and the fine can go up to $ 1,652 if it goes through court (photo: cyclists in Melbourne)

Shane Patton, Victoria Police Commissioner, said enforcing the new rules could be difficult, but added that it was more about education than punishment.

“It’s about sending everyone a message,” he told 3AW radio.

“We will use discretion where necessary and try to train drivers.”

Advertisement

.