Victimized back at school, Tate learns to ride a tricycle while recovering from the 10th floor push

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Tate’s victim, now eight, is back at school learning to ride a tricycle while recovering from the balcony pressure on the 10th floor by Jonty Bravery

  • The victim, now eight, is adjusting to life after the London incident in 2019
  • A letter from his family reveals that he is back at school and learning to ride a tricycle
  • Jonty Bravery is currently serving a 15-year sentence for attempted murder

A six-year-old boy thrown off the 10th floor of the Tate Modern is back in school and is learning to ride a tricycle, his family has said.

The boy, now eight, was snatched and thrown from the viewing platform by Jonty Bravery, 17, at the time of the attack on August 4, 2019.

The child survived but is being treated around the clock, while Bravery, who told horrified onlookers that social services were responsible for the cruelty, is currently serving a minimum of 15 years in prison for attempted murder.

Police were called to the Tate Modern in 2019 after the boy was thrown from the 10th floor

Two years later, the family wrote a letter outlining the victim’s progress.

“Our little knight is back to school,” the letter posted on the fundraising page set up to cover medical expenses. ‘Two mornings a week.

“Of course he has to make new friends, but he is very sociable, and the children at this school are very welcoming, as are the teacher and other professionals.”

They add that they hope he will be able to keep up with the curriculum.

The letter also shows that the boy is using a wheelchair that he can move himself “thanks to the progress he has made with his left arm.”

It adds that he is also making progress in learning to ride a modified tricycle, which they can take on a family ride.

The boy needed round-the-clock care after being thrown off the viewing gallery

The boy needed round-the-clock care after being thrown off the viewing gallery

Amid the exercises that are sometimes a bit daunting for an eight-year-old, something more exciting comes out – he’s trying out a modified tricycle that we’ll be able to offer him for his rehab at home, as well as for fun.

During the first test, our son smiled from the beginning to the end of the session. And the way he managed to drive the vehicle astonished his physiotherapists.

“We hope we can take him for a ride soon.”

They sign the letter with ‘take care of yourself and your loved ones’.

The fundraiser page has raised more than €313,000 for the French family.

In April of this year, a report from the Local Safeguarding Children Partnership in West London could not blame anyone for Bravery to be free to attack the child.

A serious case review of Bravery published in April revealed a series of violent incidents in the two years before he hit, as well as other examples of troubling behavior, including stool in his mother’s makeup brushes or out his window. throwing at neighbors as well as threatening to kill members of the public.

One rescuer said they believed it was “only by luck” that he hadn’t killed anyone, while Bravery’s attacks were often premeditated and seemed to please him, especially when he took blood after biting another child.

Jonty Bravery, 19, is serving a 15-year sentence for attempted murder, but despite repeated violence against others, he was not considered a risk and no one is guilty, according to a report published in April.

Jonty Bravery, 19, is serving a 15-year sentence for attempted murder, but despite repeated violence against others, he was not considered a risk and no one is to blame, according to a report published in April.

Five months before the Tate attack, he attacked a Burger King employee in Brighton after beating his carer, whom he also racially abused.

A year earlier, he told a counselor that he “planned to kill / hurt his stepmother and sister if he got the chance and he wanted to be arrested and go to jail.”

But rescuers decided he didn’t mean it and that it was seeking attention.

Investigators concluded that Bravery’s violent behavior had abated at the time of the Tate Modern attack, as he lived in a custom placement with two-to-one care.

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