Vax hesitant to be on a ventilator with COVID, will have funeral at the church she was supposed to get married in

A 29-year-old surgical technician who was due to marry this summer — but died after failing to take the COVID-19 vaccination due to unfounded fears it would render her sterile — will be mourned at the church she booked to take her vows to lay.

Samantha Wendell of Grand Rivers, Kentucky, was said to walk down the aisle of Trinity Lutheran Church in Lisle, Illinois in late August with her fiancé Austin Eskew, a correctional sergeant.

Instead, funeral services for the 29-year-old will be held Saturday at the same church where her parents were married years ago, according to NBC News.

The couple had both refused to be vaccinated after Wendell’s colleagues falsely told the bride-to-be, who wanted three to four children, that the vaccine could cause infertility.

Samantha Wendell (right), of Grand Rivers, Kentucky, was said to walk down the aisle in late August with her fiancé Austin Eskew (left), a correctional sergeant

Pictured: Samantha Wendell, a 29-year-old who was due to get married this summer but died after failing to take the COVID-19 vaccination due to unfounded fears it would make her infertile

Pictured: Samantha Wendell, a 29-year-old who was due to get married this summer but died after failing to take the COVID-19 vaccination due to unfounded fears it would make her infertile

The CDC has confirmed that the vaccination is safe for “people who are trying to conceive now or may become pregnant in the future, as well as their partners.”

Still, Wendell hesitated. While waiting to make a decision, she caught COVID-19.

She spent her wedding day on August 21 on a ventilator and died a short time later.

“Disinformation killed her,” Wendell’s niece Maria Vibandor Hayes told NBC News.

Her niece said her family is now telling her story in hopes it won’t happen to anyone else.

“If we can save more lives and the lives of families, then this is the gift she left us,” Vibandor said.

The couple had both refused to be vaccinated after Wendell's colleagues falsely told the bride-to-be, who wanted to have three to four children, that the vaccine could cause infertility.

The couple had both refused to be vaccinated after Wendell’s colleagues falsely told the bride-to-be, who wanted to have three to four children, that the vaccine could cause infertility.

Wendell, who wanted to have three to four children, was shocked by the vaccine over growing claims that the COVID-19 vaccine affects fertility

Wendell, who wanted to have three to four children, was shocked by the vaccine over growing claims that the COVID-19 vaccine affects fertility

Services for the 29-year-old will now be held on Saturday at Trinity Lutheran Church in Lisle, Illinois, pictured, where her parents married themselves years ago

Services for the 29-year-old will now be held on Saturday at Trinity Lutheran Church in Lisle, Illinois, pictured, where her parents married themselves years ago

Tragically, despite her previous hesitation, Wendell had flipped the vaccine and decided to take the shot after the rise in the delta variant, NBC News reported.

Wendell and her fiancé had made an appointment to get vaccinated in late July, ahead of her honeymoon in Mexico, but it would be too late.

Before her trip, she held her bachelorette party in Nashville, and when she got home, just a week before she and her fiancé were due to be vaccinated, she began to feel ill, NBC News reported.

“She couldn’t stop coughing,” Eskew said, and when she began to gasp, she was taken to the hospital.

Both Wendell and Eskew, neither of whom had any underlying conditions, tested positive for the virus, but Wendell had the more severe symptoms and in an effort to stabilize her, doctors put her on a ventilator on August 16, just five days before she was placed to be diagnosed with cancer. to marry.

“Samantha had a heart of gold and when she set her sights on something, she wouldn’t let anything stand in her way,” her obituary read.

She spent her wedding day on August 21 on a ventilator and died a short time later

She spent her wedding day on August 21 on a ventilator and died a short time later

Wendell’s mother told NBC News before she was put on a ventilator, the 29-year-old asked if she could get the vaccine.

“Of course it wouldn’t do any good at that point,” Jeaneen Wendell said. “It just weighs heavily on my heart that this could have been easily prevented.”

Despite hopes that the wedding would only be postponed and not canceled, Wendell’s family made the decision to take her off the ventilator on September 10 when doctors told them there was no chance of survival.

Now Wendell’s fiancé says he feels “lost” without his bride-to-be, whom he’d been dating since college.

Samantha Wendell, 29, of Kentucky, died after deciding not to get the vaccine again after some of her colleagues told her the vaccine causes infertility

Samantha Wendell, 29, of Kentucky, died after deciding not to get the vaccine again after some of her colleagues told her the vaccine causes infertility

Samantha Wendell, 29, of Kentucky, died after deciding not to get the vaccine again after some of her colleagues told her the vaccine causes infertility

“She had such an influence on everything I do,” he said. “We’ve never actually done anything without the other in mind.”

Instead of a wedding, her family is now organizing a funeral on September 18.

Family and friends remember Wendell for her ‘heart of gold’ and her determination.

‘Samantha loved her job as a surgical technician and she has rescued and raised countless pets, her obituary said. ‘She loved Christmas and elaborate decorations for all the holidays, as well as surprises. Samantha loved her time at Lake Maxinkuckee and going out with her many friends.”

“Samantha had a heart of gold and when she set her sights on something, she didn’t let anything stand in her way,” the obituary added.

CDC Says There Is NO Evidence That ANY Vaccine — Including Vaccines For COVID — Causes Infertility

Despite arguments from anti-vaxxers and vaccine skeptics, there is no scientific evidence that vaccines contribute to infertility.

The CDC says the COVID-19 vaccine is recommended for anyone ages 12 and older, including women who are pregnant or may become pregnant in the future.

There is no evidence that the vaccines cause fertility loss in men or women.

In fact, many people have gotten pregnant since being vaccinated.

In support of the CDC, the UK Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) found that ‘there is no pattern… to suggest that any of the COVID-19 vaccines used in the UK may reduce the risk of birth defects’ or increases birth complications. ‘

“Pregnant women have reported similar suspected reactions to the vaccines as people who are not pregnant,” the MHRA said.

However, getting COVID-19 can affect fertility in men.

According to Scientific American, studies have shown that COVID-19 interferes with erections even nine months after infection.

“COVID affects the blood vessels that supply organs with blood, and the penis is not much different from other organs that require a lot of blood,” said Ranjith Ramasamy, director of reproductive urology at the University of Miami.

The virus also causes damage in the testicles. However, he and his colleagues found no negative changes in fertility after vaccination.

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